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PURI-NETHOL 50 MG TABLETS

Active substance(s): MERCAPTOPURINE

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501124/PL1g

®

Puri-Nethol 50 mg Tablets
(6-mercaptopurine)

Patient Information Leaflet
®
The name of your medicine is Puri-Nethol 50 mg Tablets,
®
throughout this leaflet it will be referred to as Puri-Nethol .
Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start taking
this medicine because it contains important
information for you.
- Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again.
- If you have any further questions, ask your doctor,
pharmacist or nurse.
- This medicine has been prescribed for you only. Do
not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if their
signs of illness are the same as yours.
- If you get any side effects talk to your doctor,
pharmacist or nurse. This includes any possible side
effects not listed in the leaflet. See section 4.
What is in this leaflet:
®
1) What Puri-Nethol is and what it is used for
®
2) What you need to know before you take Puri-Nethol
®
3) How to take Puri-Nethol
4) Possible side effects
®
5) How to store Puri-Nethol
6) Contents of the pack and other information
®

1) WHAT PURI-NETHOL IS AND WHAT IT IS USED
FOR
®
Puri-Nethol tablets contain the active substance called
6-mercaptopurine. 6-mercaptopurine belongs to a group of
medicines called cytotoxics (also called chemotherapy) and
works by reducing the number of new blood cells your body
makes.
®
Puri-Nethol is used to treat cancer of the blood (leukaemia)
in adults, adolescents and children.
2) WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW BEFORE YOU TAKE
®
PURI-NETHOL
®
Do not take Puri-Nethol :
If you are allergic to 6-mercaptopurine or any of the other
ingredients of this medicine (listed in section 6).
Warnings and precautions
®
Talk to your doctor or pharmacist before taking Puri-Nethol :
• If you have recently received, or are due to receive, a
®
vaccination (vaccine). If you take Puri-Nethol , you
should not have a live organism vaccine (for example;
flu vaccine, measles vaccine, BCG vaccine, etc.) until
advised it is safe to do so by your doctor. This is
because some vaccines may give you an infection if
®
you receive them while you are taking Puri-Nethol .
• If you have reduced liver function or liver damage.
• If you have a genetic condition called TPMT (thiopurine
methyltransferase) deficiency.
• If you have an inherited mutation in the NUDT15-gene
(a gene which is involved in the breakdown of PuriNethol® in the body), you have a higher risk of
infections and hair loss and your doctor may in this
case give you a lower dose.
• If you have an allergy to a medicine called azathioprine
(also used to treat cancer).
• If you have a kidney problem.
• Tell your doctor whether you have, or have not, had
chicken pox, shingles or hepatitis B (a liver disease
caused by a virus).
• If you have a genetic condition called Lesch-Nyhan
Syndrome.
If you are receiving immunosuppressive therapy, taking Puri®
Nethol could put you at greater risk of:
• tumours, including skin cancer. Therefore, when taking
®
Puri-Nethol , avoid excessive exposure to sunlight,
wear protective clothing and use protective sunscreen
with a high protection factor.
• lymphoproliferative disorders:
®
- treatment with Puri-Nethol increases your risk of
getting a type of cancer called lymphoproliferative
disorder. With treatment regimen containing
multiple
immunosuppressants
(including
thiopurines), this may lead to death.
- a combination of multiple immunosuppressants,
given concomitantly increases the risk of disorders
of the lymph system due to a viral infection
(Epstein-Barr
virus
(EBV)
associated
lymphoproliferative disorders).
®

Taking Puri-Nethol could put you at greater risk of:
• developing a serious condition called Macrophage
Activation Syndrome (excessive activation of white
blood cells associated with inflammation), which
usually occurs in people who have certain types of
arthritis.
Infections
®
When you are treated with Puri-Nethol the risk of viral, fungal
and bacterial infections is increased and the infections may be
more serious. See also section 4.
Tell your doctor before starting treatment whether or not you
have had chickenpox, shingles or hepatitis B (a liver disease
caused by a virus).

Blood tests
®
• Treatment with Puri-Nethol may affect your bone
marrow. This means you may have a reduced number
of white blood cells, platelets and (less commonly) red
blood cells in your blood. Your doctor will carry out
blood tests daily when you are at the beginning of your
treatment (induction) and at least weekly when you are
further along into your treatment (maintenance). This is
in order to monitor the levels of these cells in your
blood. If you stop treatment early enough, your blood
cells will return to normal.
Other laboratory tests
• Additional laboratory tests (urine, blood, etc.) may also
be carried out as directed by your doctor.
Liver function
®
• Puri-Nethol is toxic to your liver. Therefore, your
doctor will carry out weekly liver function tests when
®
you are taking Puri-Nethol . If you already have liver
disease, or if you are taking other medications which
may affect your liver, your doctor will carry out more
frequent tests. If you notice the whites of your eyes or
your skin turn yellow (jaundice) tell your doctor
immediately as you may need to stop your treatment
immediately.
Children and adolescents
Low blood sugar levels (sweating more than usual, nausea,
dizziness, confusion, etc.) have been reported in some
®
children receiving Puri-Nethol ; however, most of the children
were under the age of six years old and had a low body
weight.
If you are not sure if any of the above applies to you, talk to
®
your doctor or pharmacist before taking Puri-Nethol .
®

Other medicines and Puri-Nethol
Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking, have recently
taken or might take any other medicines.
In particular, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking
any of the following:
• Ribavirin (used to treat viruses)
• Other cytotoxic medicines (chemotherapy - used to
treat cancer)
• Allopurinol, thiopurinol, oxipurinol or febuxostat (used
to treat gout)
• Olsalazine (used to treat a bowel problem called
ulcerative colitis)
• Mesalazine (used to treat Crohn’s Disease and
ulcerative colitis)
• Sulfasalazine (used to treat rheumatoid arthritis or
ulcerative colitis)
• Methotrexate (used to treat rheumatoid arthritis or
severe psoriasis)
• Infliximab (used to treat Crohn’s Disease and
ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing
spondylitis or severe psoriasis)
• Warfarin or acenocoumarol (used to ‘thin’ the blood)
®

Having vaccines while you are taking Puri-Nethol
If you are going to have a vaccination speak to your doctor or
®
nurse before you have it. If you take Puri-Nethol , you should
not have a live vaccine (for example; flu vaccine, measles
vaccine, BCG vaccine, etc.) until advised it is safe to do so by
your doctor. This is because some vaccines may give you an
®
infection if you have them whilst you are taking Puri-Nethol .
®

Puri-Nethol with food and drink
®
You can take Puri-Nethol with food or on an empty stomach
but the choice of method should be consistent from day to
day. You should take your medicine at least 1 hour before or
2 hours after having milk or dairy products.
Pregnancy and breast-feeding
If you are pregnant or breast-feeding, think you may be
pregnant or are planning to have a baby, ask your doctor for
advice before taking this medicine.
Pregnancy
®
Treatment with Puri-Nethol is not recommended during
pregnancy, particularly in the first trimester (three months)
because it may cause damage to the foetus. If you are
pregnant your doctor will consider the risks and benefits to
®
you and your baby before prescribing Puri-Nethol for you.
®

If you or your partner are taking Puri-Nethol , you must use a
reliable form of contraception to avoid pregnancy for the
®
whole course of Puri-Nethol treatment and for at least 3
®
months after receiving the last dose of Puri-Nethol . This
applies to both men and women.
Breast-feeding
It is recommended that you do not breast-feed when you are
®
taking Puri-Nethol .
Driving and using machines
®
It is not expected that Puri-Nethol will affect your ability to
drive or use machines, but no studies have been done to
confirm this.
®

Puri-Nethol tablets contain lactose
If you have been told by your doctor that you have an
intolerance to some sugars, contact your doctor before you
®
take Puri-Nethol tablets.

Continued overleaf

®®

3) HOW TO TAKE PURI-NETHOL
®
Puri-Nethol should only be prescribed to you by a specialist
doctor who is experienced in treating cancers of the blood.
®
• When you take Puri-Nethol , your doctor will take
regular blood tests. This is to check the number and
type of cells in your blood, and to ensure your liver is
working correctly
• Your doctor may also ask for other blood and urine
tests to monitor how your kidneys are working and to
measure uric acid levels. Uric acid is a natural
substance made in your body and levels of uric acid
®
can rise while you are taking Puri-Nethol . High levels
of uric acid may damage your kidneys
• Your doctor may sometimes change your dose of Puri®
Nethol as a result of these tests.
®

Always take Puri-Nethol exactly as your doctor or pharmacist
has told you. Check with your doctor or pharmacist if you are
not sure. It is important to take your medicine at the right
times. The label on your pack will tell you how many tablets to
take and how often to take them. If the label does not say or if
you are not sure, ask your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.
The usual dose for adults and children is 2.5 mg per kilogram
of your body weight each day (or alternatively 50 to 75 mg per
2
m of your body surface area each day). Your doctor will
calculate and adjust your dose based on your body weight,
results of your blood tests, whether or not you are taking other
chemotherapy medicines and your kidney and liver function.


Swallow your tablets whole. Do not chew the tablets.
The tablets should not be broken or crushed. If you or
your caregiver does handle broken tablets, wash the
hands immediately.

Reporting of side effects
If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor, nurse or
pharmacist. This includes any possible side effects not listed
in this leaflet. You can also report side effects directly via the
Yellow Card Scheme at: www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard or
search for MHRA Yellow Card in the Google Play or Apple
App Store. By reporting side effects, you can help provide
more information on the safety of this medicine.
®

5) HOW TO STORE PURI-NETHOL
• Keep out of the sight and reach of children.
• Do not use this medicine after the expiry date which is
stated on the pack after ‘EXP’.
• Do not store above 25°C. Keep the container tightly
closed.
• If you notice any sign of deterioration or discolouration
of the tablets, please tell your pharmacist immediately.
• If your doctor tells you to stop taking the tablets, it is
important to return any which are left over to your
pharmacist, who will destroy them according to
disposal of dangerous substance guidelines. Only
keep the tablets if your doctor tells you to.
6) CONTENTS OF THE PACK AND OTHER INFORMATION
®
What Puri-Nethol contains
Each tablet contains 50 mg of mercaptopurine.
The other ingredients are lactose, maize starch, hydrolysed
maize starch, stearic acid and magnesium stearate.
®

What Puri-Nethol looks like and contents of the pack
Pale yellow, round, bi-convex tablets, scored on one side,
engraved with GX above the score line and EX2 below the
score line and plain on the other side.
®

Your Puri-Nethol tablets are in bottles of 25 tablets.
You can take your medicine with food or on an empty
stomach but the choice of method should be consistent from
day to day. You should take your medicine at least 1 hour
before or 2 hours after having milk or dairy products.
®

If you take more Puri-Nethol than you should
®
If you take more Puri-Nethol than you should, tell your doctor
immediately or go to a hospital straight away. Take the
medicine pack with you.
®

If you forget to take Puri-Nethol
Tell your doctor. Do not take a double dose to make up for a
forgotten dose.

Product Licence Holder
Procured from within the EU. Product Licence Holder: Ginova
Ltd and repackager: Ginova UK Ltd both at St James’ House,
8 Overcliffe, Gravesend, Kent, DA11 0HJ.
Manufacturer
EXCELLA GmbH, Nurnberger Strasse 12, Feucht, D-90537,
Germany.
®

Puri-Nethol 50 mg Tablets
PL No: 18067/0347
POM
®

®

If you stop taking Puri-Nethol
®
If you stop taking Puri-Nethol , tell your doctor immediately.

Puri-Nethol is a registered trademark of Aspen Global
Incorporated.
th

This leaflet was last revised on 12 December 2017.
If you have any further questions on the use of this medicine,
ask your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.
4) POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS
Like all medicines, this medicine can cause side effects,
although not everybody gets them.

To request a copy of this leaflet in
Braille, large print or audio please
call 01622 690172.

If you get any of the following side effects, talk to your
specialist doctor or go to hospital immediately:
• An allergic reaction with swelling of the face and
sometimes mouth and throat (this is a very rare side
effect).
• An allergic reaction with joint pain, skin rashes, high
temperature (fever) (this is a rare side effect).
• Yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes. If you get
®
such symptoms, you should stop taking Puri-Nethol .
• Any signs of fever or infection (sore throat, sore mouth
or urinary problems) or any unexplained bruising or
®
bleeding. Treatment with Puri-Nethol affects your
bone marrow and will cause a reduction in your white
blood cells and platelets (this is a very common side
effect).
Talk to your doctor if you have any of the following side
effects, which may also happen with this medicine:
Common (may affect up to 1 in 10 people)
• Nausea (you feel sick) or vomiting (being sick)
• Low red blood cell count (anaemia)
Uncommon (may affect up to 1 in 100 people)
• Loss of appetite
Rare (may affect up to 1 in 1,000 people)
• Mouth ulcers
• Inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis); symptoms
may include abdominal pain or feeling or being sick
• Damage to your liver (hepatic necrosis)
• Hair loss
• Various types of cancers including blood, lymph and
skin cancers
Very rare (may affect up to 1 in 10,000 people)
• Blood cancer
• Cancer of the spleen and liver (in patients with a
condition called Inflammatory Bowel Disease)
• Ulcers in the intestines; symptoms may include
abdominal pain and bleeding
• Low sperm count in men
Not known (frequency cannot be estimated from the
available data)
• Increased sensitivity to sunlight and UV light
Additional side effects in children
Low blood sugar levels (sweating more than usual, nausea,
dizziness, confusion, etc.) have been reported in some
®
children receiving Puri-Nethol ; however, most of the children
were under the age of six years old and had a low body
weight.

501124/PL1g

501126/PL1g

Mercaptopurine 50 mg Tablets

Patient Information Leaflet
The name of your medicine is Mercaptopurine 50 mg Tablets,
throughout this leaflet it will be referred to as Mercaptopurine.
Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start taking
this medicine because it contains important
information for you.
- Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again.
- If you have any further questions, ask your doctor,
pharmacist or nurse.
- This medicine has been prescribed for you only. Do
not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if their
signs of illness are the same as yours.
- If you get any side effects talk to your doctor,
pharmacist or nurse. This includes any possible side
effects not listed in the leaflet. See section 4.
What is in this leaflet:
1) What Mercaptopurine is and what it is used for
2) What you need to know before you take Mercaptopurine
3) How to take Mercaptopurine
4) Possible side effects
5) How to store Mercaptopurine
6) Contents of the pack and other information

Blood tests
• Treatment with Mercaptopurine may affect your bone
marrow. This means you may have a reduced number
of white blood cells, platelets and (less commonly) red
blood cells in your blood. Your doctor will carry out
blood tests daily when you are at the beginning of your
treatment (induction) and at least weekly when you are
further along into your treatment (maintenance). This is
in order to monitor the levels of these cells in your
blood. If you stop treatment early enough, your blood
cells will return to normal.
Other laboratory tests
• Additional laboratory tests (urine, blood, etc.) may also
be carried out as directed by your doctor.
Liver function
• Mercaptopurine is toxic to your liver. Therefore, your
doctor will carry out weekly liver function tests when
you are taking Mercaptopurine. If you already have
liver disease, or if you are taking other medications
which may affect your liver, your doctor will carry out
more frequent tests. If you notice the whites of your
eyes or your skin turn yellow (jaundice) tell your doctor
immediately as you may need to stop your treatment
immediately.

1) WHAT MERCAPTOPURINE IS AND WHAT IT IS USED
FOR
Mercaptopurine tablets contain the active substance called
6-mercaptopurine. 6-mercaptopurine belongs to a group of
medicines called cytotoxics (also called chemotherapy) and
works by reducing the number of new blood cells your body
makes.
Mercaptopurine is used to treat cancer of the blood
(leukaemia) in adults, adolescents and children.

Children and adolescents
Low blood sugar levels (sweating more than usual, nausea,
dizziness, confusion, etc.) have been reported in some
children receiving Mercaptopurine; however, most of the
children were under the age of six years old and had a low
body weight.

2) WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW BEFORE YOU TAKE
MERCAPTOPURINE
Do not take Mercaptopurine:
If you are allergic to 6-mercaptopurine or any of the other
ingredients of this medicine (listed in section 6).

Other medicines and Mercaptopurine
Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking, have recently
taken or might take any other medicines.
In particular, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking
any of the following:
• Ribavirin (used to treat viruses)
• Other cytotoxic medicines (chemotherapy - used to
treat cancer)
• Allopurinol, thiopurinol, oxipurinol or febuxostat (used
to treat gout)
• Olsalazine (used to treat a bowel problem called
ulcerative colitis)
• Mesalazine (used to treat Crohn’s Disease and
ulcerative colitis)
• Sulfasalazine (used to treat rheumatoid arthritis or
ulcerative colitis)
• Methotrexate (used to treat rheumatoid arthritis or
severe psoriasis)
• Infliximab (used to treat Crohn’s Disease and
ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing
spondylitis or severe psoriasis)
• Warfarin or acenocoumarol (used to ‘thin’ the blood)

Warnings and precautions
Talk to your doctor or pharmacist before taking
Mercaptopurine:
• If you have recently received, or are due to receive, a
vaccination (vaccine). If you take Mercaptopurine, you
should not have a live organism vaccine (for example;
flu vaccine, measles vaccine, BCG vaccine, etc.) until
advised it is safe to do so by your doctor. This is
because some vaccines may give you an infection if
you receive them while you are taking Mercaptopurine.
• If you have reduced liver function or liver damage.
• If you have a genetic condition called TPMT (thiopurine
methyltransferase) deficiency.
• If you have an inherited mutation in the NUDT15-gene
(a gene which is involved in the breakdown of
Mercaptopurine in the body), you have a higher risk of
infections and hair loss and your doctor may in this
case give you a lower dose.
• If you have an allergy to a medicine called azathioprine
(also used to treat cancer).
• If you have a kidney problem.
• Tell your doctor whether you have, or have not, had
chicken pox, shingles or hepatitis B (a liver disease
caused by a virus).
• If you have a genetic condition called Lesch-Nyhan
Syndrome.
If you are receiving immunosuppressive therapy, taking
Mercaptopurine could put you at greater risk of:
• tumours, including skin cancer. Therefore, when taking
Mercaptopurine, avoid excessive exposure to sunlight,
wear protective clothing and use protective sunscreen
with a high protection factor.
• lymphoproliferative disorders:
- treatment with Mercaptopurine increases your risk
of
getting
a
type
of
cancer
called
lymphoproliferative disorder. With treatment
regimen containing multiple immunosuppressants
(including thiopurines), this may lead to death.
- a combination of multiple immunosuppressants,
given concomitantly increases the risk of
disorders of the lymph system due to a viral
infection (Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) - associated
lymphoproliferative disorders).
Taking Mercaptopurine could put you at greater risk of:
• developing a serious condition called Macrophage
Activation Syndrome (excessive activation of white
blood cells associated with inflammation), which
usually occurs in people who have certain types of
arthritis.
Infections
When you are treated with Mercaptopurine the risk of viral,
fungal and bacterial infections is increased and the infections
may be more serious. See also section 4.
Tell your doctor before starting treatment whether or not you
have had chickenpox, shingles or hepatitis B (a liver disease
caused by a virus).

If you are not sure if any of the above applies to you, talk to
your doctor or pharmacist before taking Mercaptopurine.

Having vaccines while you are taking Mercaptopurine
If you are going to have a vaccination speak to your doctor or
nurse before you have it. If you take Mercaptopurine, you
should not have a live vaccine (for example; flu vaccine,
measles vaccine, BCG vaccine, etc.) until advised it is safe to
do so by your doctor. This is because some vaccines may
give you an infection if you have them whilst you are taking
Mercaptopurine.
Mercaptopurine with food and drink
You can take Mercaptopurine with food or on an empty
stomach but the choice of method should be consistent from
day to day. You should take your medicine at least 1 hour
before or 2 hours after having milk or dairy products.
Pregnancy and breast-feeding
If you are pregnant or breast-feeding, think you may be
pregnant or are planning to have a baby, ask your doctor for
advice before taking this medicine.
Pregnancy
Treatment with Mercaptopurine is not recommended during
pregnancy, particularly in the first trimester (three months)
because it may cause damage to the foetus. If you are
pregnant your doctor will consider the risks and benefits to
you and your baby before prescribing Mercaptopurine for you.
If you or your partner are taking Mercaptopurine, you must
use a reliable form of contraception to avoid pregnancy for the
whole course of Mercaptopurine treatment and for at least 3
months after receiving the last dose of Mercaptopurine. This
applies to both men and women.
Breast-feeding
It is recommended that you do not breast-feed when you are
taking Mercaptopurine.
Driving and using machines
It is not expected that Mercaptopurine will affect your ability to
drive or use machines, but no studies have been done to
confirm this.
Mercaptopurine tablets contain lactose
If you have been told by your doctor that you have an
intolerance to some sugars, contact your doctor before you
take Mercaptopurine tablets.

Continued overleaf

3) HOW TO TAKE MERCAPTOPURINE
Mercaptopurine should only be prescribed to you by a
specialist doctor who is experienced in treating cancers of the
blood.
• When you take Mercaptopurine, your doctor will take
regular blood tests. This is to check the number and
type of cells in your blood, and to ensure your liver is
working correctly
• Your doctor may also ask for other blood and urine
tests to monitor how your kidneys are working and to
measure uric acid levels. Uric acid is a natural
substance made in your body and levels of uric acid
can rise while you are taking Mercaptopurine. High
levels of uric acid may damage your kidneys
• Your doctor may sometimes change your dose of
Mercaptopurine as a result of these tests.
Always take Mercaptopurine exactly as your doctor or
pharmacist has told you. Check with your doctor or
pharmacist if you are not sure. It is important to take your
medicine at the right times. The label on your pack will tell you
how many tablets to take and how often to take them. If the
label does not say or if you are not sure, ask your doctor,
nurse or pharmacist.
The usual dose for adults and children is 2.5 mg per kilogram
of your body weight each day (or alternatively 50 to 75 mg per
2
m of your body surface area each day). Your doctor will
calculate and adjust your dose based on your body weight,
results of your blood tests, whether or not you are taking other
chemotherapy medicines and your kidney and liver function.


Swallow your tablets whole. Do not chew the tablets.
The tablets should not be broken or crushed. If you or
your caregiver does handle broken tablets, wash the
hands immediately.

You can take your medicine with food or on an empty
stomach but the choice of method should be consistent from
day to day. You should take your medicine at least 1 hour
before or 2 hours after having milk or dairy products.

Additional side effects in children
Low blood sugar levels (sweating more than usual, nausea,
dizziness, confusion, etc.) have been reported in some
children receiving Mercaptopurine; however, most of the
children were under the age of six years old and had a low
body weight.
Reporting of side effects
If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor, nurse or
pharmacist. This includes any possible side effects not listed
in this leaflet. You can also report side effects directly via the
Yellow Card Scheme at: www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard or
search for MHRA Yellow Card in the Google Play or Apple
App Store. By reporting side effects, you can help provide
more information on the safety of this medicine.
5) HOW TO STORE MERCAPTOPURINE
• Keep out of the sight and reach of children.
• Do not use this medicine after the expiry date which is
stated on the pack after ‘EXP’.
• Do not store above 25°C. Keep the container tightly
closed.
• If you notice any sign of deterioration or discolouration
of the tablets, please tell your pharmacist immediately.
• If your doctor tells you to stop taking the tablets, it is
important to return any which are left over to your
pharmacist, who will destroy them according to
disposal of dangerous substance guidelines. Only
keep the tablets if your doctor tells you to.
6) CONTENTS OF THE PACK AND OTHER INFORMATION
What Mercaptopurine contains
Each tablet contains 50 mg of mercaptopurine.
The other ingredients are lactose, maize starch, hydrolysed
maize starch, stearic acid and magnesium stearate.
What Mercaptopurine looks like and contents of the pack
Pale yellow, round, bi-convex tablets, scored on one side,
engraved with GX above the score line and EX2 below the
score line and plain on the other side.
Your Mercaptopurine tablets are in bottles of 25 tablets.

If you take more Mercaptopurine than you should
If you take more Mercaptopurine than you should, tell your
doctor immediately or go to a hospital straight away. Take the
medicine pack with you.
If you forget to take Mercaptopurine
Tell your doctor. Do not take a double dose to make up for a
forgotten dose.
If you stop taking Mercaptopurine
If you stop taking Mercaptopurine,
immediately.

tell

your

doctor

Product Licence Holder and Manufacturer
Procured from within the EU. Product Licence Holder: Ginova
Ltd and repackager: Ginova UK Ltd both at St James’ House,
8 Overcliffe, Gravesend, Kent, DA11 0HJ.
Manufactured by EXCELLA GmbH, Nurnberger Strasse 12,
Feucht, D-90537, Germany.
Mercaptopurine 50 mg Tablets
PL No: 18067/0347
POM
th

This leaflet was last revised on 12 December 2017.
If you have any further questions on the use of this medicine,
ask your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.
4) POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS
Like all medicines, this medicine can cause side effects,
although not everybody gets them.

To request a copy of this leaflet in
Braille, large print or audio please
call 01622 690172.

If you get any of the following side effects, talk to your
specialist doctor or go to hospital immediately:
• An allergic reaction with swelling of the face and
sometimes mouth and throat (this is a very rare side
effect).
• An allergic reaction with joint pain, skin rashes, high
temperature (fever) (this is a rare side effect).
• Yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes. If you get
such
symptoms,
you
should
stop
taking
Mercaptopurine.
• Any signs of fever or infection (sore throat, sore mouth
or urinary problems) or any unexplained bruising or
bleeding. Treatment with Mercaptopurine affects your
bone marrow and will cause a reduction in your white
blood cells and platelets (this is a very common side
effect).
Talk to your doctor if you have any of the following side
effects, which may also happen with this medicine:
Common (may affect up to 1 in 10 people)
• Nausea (you feel sick) or vomiting (being sick)
• Low red blood cell count (anaemia)
Uncommon (may affect up to 1 in 100 people)
• Loss of appetite
Rare (may affect up to 1 in 1,000 people)
• Mouth ulcers
• Inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis); symptoms
may include abdominal pain or feeling or being sick
• Damage to your liver (hepatic necrosis)
• Hair loss
• Various types of cancers including blood, lymph and
skin cancers
Very rare (may affect up to 1 in 10,000 people)
• Blood cancer
• Cancer of the spleen and liver (in patients with a
condition called Inflammatory Bowel Disease)
• Ulcers in the intestines; symptoms may include
abdominal pain and bleeding
• Low sperm count in men
Not known (frequency cannot be estimated from the
available data)
• Increased sensitivity to sunlight and UV light
501126/PL1g

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