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OXYTOCIN 10 IU/ML CONCENTRATE FOR SOLUTION FOR INFUSION

Active substance(s): OXYTOCIN

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Package leaflet: Information for the patient

hameln

Oxytocin 10 IU/ml
Concentrate for Solution for Infusion
oxytocin
Read all of this leaflet carefully before you receive this medicine because it contains
important information for you.
- Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again.
- If you have any further questions, ask your doctor, midwife or nurse.
- If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor, midwife or nurse. This includes any possible side effects
not listed in this leaflet. See section 4.

What is in this leaflet
1. What Oxytocin is and what it is used for
2. What you need to know before you receive Oxytocin
3. How Oxytocin is given to you
4. Possible side effects
5. How to store Oxytocin
6. Contents of the pack and other information

1. What Oxytocin is and what it is used
for
Oxytocin contains a manufactured form of oxytocin
(a natural hormone). It belongs to a group of
medicines called oxytocics that make the muscles of
the womb contract.
Oxytocin is used:
• to start or help contractions during childbirth
(labour)
• to help in the management of a miscarriage
• to prevent and control bleeding after delivery of
your baby
• during a caesarean section.

2. What you need to know before you
receive Oxytocin
You must not receive Oxytocin:
• if you are allergic to oxytocin or any of the
ingredients of this medicine (listed in section 6)
• if your doctor thinks that to start or increase
contractions of the womb would be unsuitable for
you, for example:
- where contractions of the womb are unusually
strong
- where there are obstructions that may prevent
delivery
- where your baby may be short of oxygen
• where labour or vaginal delivery is not advisable,
for example:
- if your baby’s head is too large to fit through
your pelvis
- if your baby is wrongly positioned in the birth
canal
- if the placenta lies near or over the neck of your
womb
- if your baby lacks oxygen due to blood vessels
running across the neck of your womb
- if the placenta separates from the womb before
the baby is born
- if there are one or more loops of umbilical cord
between the baby and the neck of the womb,
either before or after your waters break
- if your womb is over-extended and more
likely to tear, for example if you are carrying
more than one baby or have too much water
(amniotic fluid) in your womb
- if you have had five or more pregnancies in
the past or if your womb is scarred by previous
caesarean section or other surgery
• if you have been given medicines called
prostaglandins (used to bring on labour or treat
stomach ulcers). Oxytocin should not be used for
6 hours after vaginal prostaglandins as the effects
of both medicines may be increased
Oxytocin should not be used for prolonged
periods if:
• your contractions do not increase with the
treatment
• you have a condition known as severe preeclamptic toxaemia (high blood pressure, protein
in the urine and swelling)
• you have severe problems with your heart or
blood circulation.

• you have a known irregular heart beat (‘long QT
syndrome’) or related symptoms, or are taking
medicines known to cause the syndrome (see
section ‘Other medicines and Oxytocin’)
• you have had a previous caesarean section
• you are more than 35 years old
• you have raised blood pressure or heart problems
• your womb was contracting strongly but has now
begun to contract less strongly
• you have been told by a doctor or midwife that
normal delivery may be difficult for you due to the
small size of your pelvis
• you have kidney problems, as Oxytocin can cause
water retention
• you have had complications during your
pregnancy
• you are more than 40 weeks pregnant.
When Oxytocin is given to induce and enhance
labour, the infusion rate should be set to maintain
a contraction pattern similar to normal labour and
adjusted to individual response. Too high doses
may cause very strong continuous contractions
and possibly tearing of the womb, with serious
complications for you and your baby.
Oxytocin may rarely cause disseminated
intravascular coagulation which causes symptoms
including abnormal blood clotting, bleeding and
anaemia.
High doses of Oxytocin may force amniotic fluid
from your womb into your blood. This is known as
amniotic fluid embolism.
Large doses of Oxytocin over a long period of time,
whilst drinking or receiving large volumes of fluid may
make your stomach feel very full, cause difficulty in
breathing and lower salt levels in your blood.
If any of the above applies to you, or if you are not
sure, speak to your doctor or midwife before you
receive Oxytocin.
Other medicines and Oxytocin
Tell your doctor or midwife if you are taking or have
recently taken any of the following medicines as they
may interfere with Oxytocin:
• prostaglandins (used to start labour or to treat
stomach ulcers) and similar drugs as the effects
of both drugs may be increased
• medicines that can cause an irregular heartbeat,
as Oxytocin may increase this effect
• anaesthetics which you breathe in (e.g. to put
you to sleep during surgery), such as halothane,
cyclopropane, sevoflurane or desflurane) as
these may weaken your contractions, or cause
problems with your heartbeat
• anaesthetic medicines for local or regional pain
relief, in particular an epidural for pain relief during
labour. Oxytocin may increase the blood vessel
narrowing effect of these medicines and cause an
increase in blood pressure.
Please tell your doctor or midwife if you are taking or
have recently taken any other medicines, including
medicines obtained without a prescription.

Warnings and precautions
Oxytocin should only be administered by a
healthcare professional in a hospital setting.

Oxytocin with food and drink
You may be told to keep the amount of fluids you
drink to a minimum.

Oxytocin should not be given as rapid injection into a
vein as this may cause decreased blood pressure, a
sudden brief sensation of heat (often over the entire
body), and an increased heart rate.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding
Based on wide experience of use and the nature of
this medicine, it is not expected that Oxytocin would
be a risk to your baby when used correctly. Oxytocin
may be found in small amounts in breast milk but is
not expected to have harmful effects because it is
quickly inactivated by your baby’s digestive system.

Before you receive Oxytocin tell your doctor or
midwife if:
• you are prone to chest pain due to pre-existing
heart and/or circulation problems

Driving and using machines
Oxytocin can start labour. Women with contractions
should not drive or use machines.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------The following information is intended for medical or healthcare
professionals only:

hameln

Oxytocin 10 IU/ml Concentrate for Solution for Infusion
oxytocin
Method of administration for each indication:
Induction or enhancement of labour
Oxytocin should not be started for 6 hours following administration of vaginal prostaglandins. Oxytocin
should be administered as an i.v. drip infusion or, preferably, by means of a variable-speed infusion
pump. For drip infusion it is recommended that 5 IU of Oxytocin be added to 500ml of a physiological
electrolyte solution (such as sodium chloride 0.9%). For patients in whom infusion of sodium chloride
must be avoided, 5% dextrose solution may be used as the diluent. To ensure even mixing, the bottle
or bag must be turned upside down several times before use.
The initial infusion rate should be set at 1 to 4 milliunits/minute (2 to 8 drops/minute). It may be gradually
increased at intervals not shorter than 20 minutes and increments of not more than 1-2 milliunits/
minute, until a contraction pattern similar to that of normal labour is established. In pregnancy near
term this can often be achieved with an infusion of less than 10 milliunits/minute (20 drops/minute),
and the recommended maximum rate is 20 milliunits/minute (40 drops/minute). In the unusual event
that higher rates are required, as may occur in the management of foetal death in utero or for induction
of labour at an earlier stage of pregnancy, when the uterus is less sensitive to oxytocin, it is advisable
to use a more concentrated Oxytocin solution, e.g., 10 IU in 500ml.
When using a motor-driven infusion pump which delivers smaller volumes than those given by drip
infusion, the concentration suitable for infusion within the recommended dosage range must be
calculated according to the specifications of the pump.
The frequency, strength and duration of contractions as well as the foetal heart rate must be carefully
monitored throughout the infusion. Once an adequate level of uterine activity is attained, aiming for
3 to 4 contractions every 10 minutes, the infusion rate can often be reduced. In the event of uterine
hyperactivity and/or foetal distress, the infusion must be discontinued immediately.

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3. How Oxytocin is given to you
Your doctor or midwife will decide when and how to
treat you with Oxytocin. If you think that the effect of
Oxytocin is too strong or too weak, tell your doctor or
midwife. While you are receiving Oxytocin, both you
and your baby will be closely monitored.
Oxytocin is usually diluted before use and given as
an intravenous infusion (drip) into one of your veins.
The usual dose is different in the following
circumstances:
To start or help contractions during labour
The rate of infusion will start at 2 to 8 drops per
minute. This may be gradually increased to a
maximum rate of 40 drops per minute. The infusion
rate can often be reduced once the contractions
reach an adequate level, about 3- 4 contractions
every 10 minutes.
If your contractions do not reach the adequate
level after 5 IU the attempt to start labour should be
stopped and then repeated the following day.
Miscarriage
The dose is 5 IU by infusion into a vein. In some
cases this may be followed by a drip at 40 to 80
drops per minute.
Caesarean section
The dose is 5 IU by infusion into a vein immediately
after delivery of your baby.
Prevention of bleeding after delivery
The dose is 5 IU by infusion into a vein after delivery
of the placenta.
Treatment of bleeding after delivery
The dose is 5 IU by infusion into a vein. In some
cases this may be followed by a drip containing 5 to
20 IU of oxytocin.
Elderly (65 years and over)
There is no information on use in elderly patients.
Oxytocin is not intended for use in the elderly.
Children and adolescents
There is no information on use in children (2-11
years) or adolescents (12-17 years). Oxytocin is not
intended for use in children or adolescents.
Patients with kidney disease
There is no information on use in patients with kidney
disease. However, you should tell your doctor if you
suffer from kidney problems (see section 2 ‘Warnings
and precautions’).
Patients with liver disease
There is no information on use in patients with liver
disease.
What to do if you receive more Oxytocin than
you should
As this medicine is given to you in hospital, it is very
unlikely that you will receive an overdose.
If anyone accidentally receives this medicine, tell the
hospital accident and emergency department or a
doctor immediately. Show any left over medicines or
the empty packet to the doctor.
An overdose of Oxytocin could cause:
• very strong contractions of your womb
• damage to your womb which could include tearing
• the placenta to come away from your womb
• amniotic fluid (the fluid around the baby) to enter
your bloodstream
• harm to your baby.
What to do if you miss a dose
As a doctor or midwife is giving you this medicine,
you are unlikely to miss a dose.
If you have any further questions on the use of this
medicine, ask your doctor or midwife.

4. Possible side effects
Like all medicines, Oxytocin can cause side effects,
although not everyone gets them.
Common side effects (more than 1 in 100 patients)
of Oxytocin include:
• feeling or being sick
• headache
• fast or slow heartbeat
Uncommon side effects (more than 1 in 1,000
patients) of Oxytocin include:
• an irregular heartbeat.
Rare side effects (more than 1 in 10,000 patients) of
Oxytocin include:

• skin rashes
• a severe allergic reaction with difficulty in
breathing, dizziness and lightheadedness, feeling
faint, nausea, cold and clammy skin or a fast or
weak pulse
Other side effects
Effects in the mother:
• haemorrhage (bleeding)
• chest pain (angina)
• irregular heartbeat
• excessive or continuous contractions
• tearing of the womb
• fluid retention (water intoxication). Symptoms may
include headache, anorexia (loss of appetite),
feeling or being sick, stomach pain, sluggishness,
drowsiness, unconsciousness, low levels of
certain chemicals in the blood (e.g. sodium or
potassium), fits
• low blood salt levels
• sudden fluid overload in the lungs
• sudden brief sensation of heat often over the
whole body
• abnormal clotting, bleeding and anaemia
• spasm of the muscles of the womb
Effects in the baby:
Excessive contractions may cause low blood salt
levels, shortage of oxygen, suffocation and death.
Reporting of side effects
If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor, midwife
or nurse. This includes any possible side effects not
listed in this leaflet. You can also report side effects
directly via the Yellow Card Scheme at:
www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard.
By reporting side effects you can help provide more
information on the safety of this medicine.

5. How to store Oxytocin
Keep this medicine out of the sight and reach of
children.
The hospital pharmacy will store this medicine in a
refrigerator between 2 °C to 8 °C and will ensure that
it is not used after the expiry date on the pack. The
expiry date refers to the last day of that month.
If your doctor decides to stop your treatment, return
any unused medicine to the pharmacist. Only keep it
if your doctor tells you to.
Do not throw away any medicines via wastewater or
household waste. Ask your pharmacist how to throw
away medicines you no longer use.
These measures will help protect the environment.

6. Contents of the pack and other
information
What Oxytocin contains
The active substance is oxytocin.
The other ingredients are Sodium acetate trihydrate,
acetic acid glacial (for pH adjustment), sodium
chloride, sodium hydroxide (for pH adjustment) and
Water for Injections.
What Oxytocin looks like and contents of the
pack
Oxytocin is a clear, colourless, sterile liquid which
comes in a 1ml (millilitre) clear glass ampoule.
Oxytocin comes in packs of ten ampoules. Each
Oxytocin ampoule contains 10 IU (International
Units) oxytocin.
Marketing Authorisation Holder
hameln pharmaceuticals ltd
Gloucester Business Park, Gloucester, GL3 4AG,
UK.
Manufacturer
HBM Pharma s.r.o.
Sklabinská 30
03680 Martin
Slovak Republic
The information in this leaflet applies only to
Oxytocin. If you have any questions or you are not
sure about anything, ask your doctor, midwife or a
nurse.
This leaflet was last revised in January 2016.

57498/01/16

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------If, in women who are at term or near term, regular contractions are not established after the infusion
of a total amount of 5 IU, it is recommended that the attempt to induce labour be ceased; it may be
repeated on the following day, starting again from a rate of 1 to 4 milliunits/minute.
Incomplete, inevitable or missed abortion
5 IU by i.v. infusion (5 IU diluted in physiological electrolyte solution and administered as an i.v. drip
infusion or preferably, by means of a variable-speed infusion pump over 5 minutes), if necessary
followed by i.v. infusion at a rate of 20 to 40 milliunits/minute.
Caesarean section
5 IU by i.v. infusion (5 IU diluted in physiological electrolyte solution and administered as an i.v. drip
infusion or, preferably, by means of a variable- speed infusion pump over 5 minutes) immediately after
delivery.
Prevention of postpartum uterine haemorrhage
The usual dose is 5 IU by i.v. infusion (5 IU diluted in physiological electrolyte solution and administered
as an i.v. drip infusion or, preferably, by means of a variable-speed infusion pump over 5 minutes) after
delivery of the placenta. In women given Oxytocin for induction or enhancement of labour, the infusion
should be continued at an increased rate during the third stage of labour and for the next few hours
thereafter.
Treatment of postpartum uterine haemorrhage
5 IU by i.v. infusion (5 IU diluted in physiological electrolyte solution and administered as an i.v. drip
infusion or, preferably, by means of a variable- speed infusion pump over 5 minutes), followed in
severe cases by i.v. infusion of a solution containing 5 to 20 IU of oxytocin in 500ml of an electrolytecontaining diluent, run at the rate necessary to control uterine atony.
Note - Oxytocin should not be infused via the same apparatus as blood or plasma, because the
peptide linkages are rapidly inactivated by oxytocin- inactivating enzymes. Oxytocin is incompatible
with solutions containing sodium metabisulphite as a stabiliser.
Storage – Store between 2 °C and 8 °C.

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Source: Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided here is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. This information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. If you have questions about the substances you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

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