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MENITORIX POWDER AND SOLVENT FOR SOLUTION FOR INJECTION

Active substance(s): HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE TYPE B CAPSULAR POLYSACCHARIDE / NEISSERIA MENING. C11 POLYSACCHARIDE - TETANUS TOXOID CONJ. / HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE TYPE B CAPSULAR POLYSACCHARIDE / NEISSERIA MENING. C11 POLYSACCHARIDE - TETANUS TOXOID CONJ.

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Package leaflet: Information for the user

powder and solvent for solution for injection
Haemophilus type b and Meningococcal group C conjugate vaccine
Read all of this leaflet carefully before your child starts receiving this vaccine because it
contains important information for you.
- Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again.
- If you have any further questions, ask your doctor, pharmacist or nurse.
- This vaccine has been prescribed for your child only. Do not pass it on to others.
- If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor, pharmacist or nurse. This includes any possible side
effects not listed in this leaflet. See section 4.
What is in this leaflet:
1 What Menitorix is and what it is used for
2 What you need to know before your child receives Menitorix
3 How Menitorix is given
4 Possible side effects
5 How to store Menitorix
6 Contents of the pack and other information

1 What Menitorix is and what it is used for
Menitorix is a vaccine that can be given to children after the age of 2 months up to 2 years to prevent
infectious diseases caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and Neisseria meningitidis group
C (MenC) bacteria. The vaccine works by causing the body to produce its own protection (antibodies)
against these bacteria. The vaccine cannot cause Hib and MenC.
Ě H
 aemophilus influenzae type b (Hib): Hib bacteria most frequently cause meningitis (inflammation
of the coverings of the brain and spinal cord). Even after recovery from Hib meningitis there can
be complications such as mental retardation, spastic paralysis, deafness or epilepsy. Hib infection
can also cause a life-threatening inflammation of the throat with severe swelling that can cause
suffocation. Less commonly, the bacteria can infect other parts of the body, particularly the lungs
(causing pneumonia) and the bones and joints.
Ě N
 eisseria meningitidis group C (MenC): Like Hib bacteria, MenC bacteria most frequently cause
meningitis. They may also cause severe blood infections and spread throughout the body.
Vaccination is the best way to protect against diseases caused by these bacteria. Remember, however,
that no vaccine can provide complete, life-long protection in all people vaccinated. Also, Menitorix can
only protect against meningitis and other infections caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and
Neisseria meningitidis group C (MenC). It cannot protect against meningitis caused by other bacteria or
viruses, including other types and groups of Haemophilus or Neisseria bacteria.

2 What you need to know before your child receives Menitorix
Menitorix should not be given:
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toxoid or any of the other ingredients of this medicine (listed in section 6). Signs of an allergic reaction
may include itchy skin rash, shortness of breath and swelling of the face or tongue.
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child is better before giving the vaccine. A minor infection such as a cold should not be a problem but
talk to your doctor or nurse first.
Remember that the first dose of Menitorix should not be given before your child is 2 months of age.
Warnings and precautions
Talk to your doctor or nurse before your child receives Menitorix
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child has HIV infection or any other illness that can reduce his or her immunity to infections. Your child
can still be given Menitorix if your doctor or nurse advises it but your child may not develop as good
protection against Hib and MenC infections as other children.
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months after birth onwards but it is not known if protection against Hib and MenC will be as good as
in children born at term.
In the first 1-2 weeks after a dose of Menitorix it is possible that urine tests to detect Hib infection could
give the wrong (false positive) results.
Other medicines and Menitorix
Tell your doctor or nurse if your child is taking, has recently taken or might take any other medicines.
Menitorix can be given at the same time as vaccines intended to protect against one or more of
diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, polio, hepatitis B, pneumococcal conjugate vaccine and combined
vaccines against measles, mumps and rubella (MMR). Any other vaccines that are given at the same time
as Menitorix will be injected separately at different parts of the body.
Although Menitorix contains tetanus toxoid (inactivated bacterial toxin), which is used to immunise
people against tetanus (lockjaw), it is still necessary that your child should receive the recommended
childhood vaccinations against tetanus.
Menitorix contains sodium
This medicinal product contains less than 1 mmol sodium (23 mg) per dose, i.e. essentially “sodium free”.

3 How Menitorix is given
Each dose of Menitorix is a single injection of half a millilitre (0.5 ml). The nurse or doctor will give
Menitorix as an injection into the muscle (usually into the thigh muscle but in toddlers the arm muscle
can be used) and will make sure that the vaccine is not given into a blood vessel or into the upper layer
of the skin.
If Menitorix is used in infants for the first vaccinations against Hib and MenC
Your child will receive three doses of Menitorix. The first injection can be given from the age of 2 months
onwards and there should be a gap of at least four weeks between injections. Alternatively, from the age
of 3 months, your child may receive 2 injections, each separated by 2 months.
If your child was born prematurely, he/she will receive 3 injections from 2 months to 12 months of age
with an interval of at least 2 months between each one.
If Menitorix is used to boost protection against Hib and MenC
After the first course of vaccinations against Hib and MenC has been completed a booster dose of
Hib and MenC should be given, usually at some time in the second year of life.
Menitorix can be used to boost protection in children who received Menitorix previously or in
children who previously received other vaccines against these diseases (including children who
received two doses of a MenC vaccine in early life).
If your child receives more Menitorix than he/she should
It is very unlikely that your child will receive too much or too little vaccine because each dose is
provided in a separate vial and the vaccine is given by a doctor or nurse. If you are concerned about
the dose or doses that have been given, please talk to your doctor or nurse.
If you forget to take your child for vaccination with Menitorix
Your doctor or nurse will advise when your child should attend for these injections. If you miss
an appointment, it is very important that you contact the surgery or clinic and make a new
appointment for your child to have the missed dose or doses as soon as possible.
If you have any further questions on the use of this medicine, ask your doctor, pharmacist or nurse.

4 Possible side effects
Like all medicines, this vaccine can cause side effects, although not everybody gets them.
Severe allergic reactions can occur to any vaccine but they are very rare and are usually seen
in less than 1 in 10,000 people who are vaccinated. Your child may be asked to stay in the surgery

or vaccination area for a short time after vaccination to check that he or she does not have an
immediate allergic reaction. Tell the doctor or nurse immediately if your child develops a rash
(which may be raised or lumpy), tightness of the throat, swelling of the face or neck or shortness
of breath. Other possible symptoms of a severe allergic reaction include a drop in blood pressure
and unconsciousness. It is very important that your child has immediate medical treatment for any
severe allergic reaction. If the symptoms start after you have left the clinic, you should get medical
help as soon as possible (for example, go to the nearest accident and emergency department).
In clinical trials that involved giving Menitorix for the first vaccinations against Hib and MenC or
to boost protection against these diseases the side effects that occurred after vaccination were:
♦ Very common (these may occur with more than 1 in 10 doses of the vaccine)
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♦ Common (these may occur with up to 1 in 10 doses of the vaccine)
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♦ Uncommon (these may occur with up to 1 in 100 doses of the vaccine)
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♦ Rare (these may occur with up to 1 in 1,000 doses of the vaccine)
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Other side effects have occurred in the days or weeks after vaccination with Menitorix. The frequency
cannot be estimated from the available data. They include:
Allergic reactions (these can be recognised by itchy rash of the hands and feet, swelling of the eyes and
face, difficulty in breathing or swallowing), swelling of the glands, dizziness, convulsions (fits) with high
temperature, unusual muscle slackness, headache.
In babies born very prematurely (at or before 28 weeks of gestation) longer gaps than normal between
breaths may occur for 2-3 days after vaccination.
Some other side effects have been reported very rarely (in less than 1 per 10,000 doses of vaccine) in
children who have received other MenC containing vaccines. They include: collapse or shock, the child
not responding to his or her parents for a time after vaccination, fainting, convulsions in children who
have had them before, lack of sensation or an increased sensation (for example pain, pins and needles or
itching at the injection site), joint pain, or purple spots or patches under the skin.
This vaccine cannot cause MenC or Hib infections. If your child experiences neck pain, neck stiffness or a
dislike of light (photophobia), drowsiness or confusion, or red or purple bruise-like spots that do not fade
under pressure you should contact your doctor or local accident and emergency department immediately
to rule out other causes.
If you have previously been told by your doctor that your child suffers from nephrotic syndrome (a kidney
disease which may result in swelling, particularly around the face or eyes, protein in the urine making
it appear frothy and/or weight gain) there may be an increased chance that this condition will reoccur
within a few months after vaccination. You should tell your doctor if you notice similar symptoms in your
child after vaccination.
Reporting of side effects
If your child gets any side effects, talk to your doctor, pharmacist or nurse. This includes any possible side
effects not listed in this leaflet. You can also report side effects directly via the Yellow Card Scheme at:
www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard
By reporting side effects, you can help provide more information on the safety of this medicine.

5 How to store Menitorix
Keep this vaccine out of the sight and reach of children.
Do not use this vaccine after the expiry date which is stated on the carton. The expiry date refers to the
last day of that month.
Store in a refrigerator (2°C - 8°C).
Do not freeze.
Store in the original package in order to protect from light.
After reconstitution, the vaccine should be administered promptly or kept in the refrigerator (2°C - 8°C).
If it is not used within 24 hours, it should be discarded.
Do not throw away any medicines via wastewater or household waste. Ask your pharmacist how to throw
away medicines your child no longer uses. These measures will help protect the environment.

6 Contents of the pack and other information
What Menitorix contains
The active substances are:
Haemophilus type b polysaccharide
(polyribosylribitol phosphate)
5 micrograms
conjugated to tetanus toxoid as carrier protein
12.5 micrograms
Neisseria meningitidis group C (strain C11) polysaccharide
5 micrograms
conjugated to tetanus toxoid as carrier protein
5 micrograms
The other ingredients are:
Powder: trometamol, sucrose
Solvent: sodium chloride, water for injections
What Menitorix looks like and contents of the pack
Menitorix is supplied as a white powder of Hib-MenC vaccine in a glass vial, together with half a millilitre
(0.5 ml) of clear colourless sodium chloride solvent in a pre-filled syringe for a 1 dose vaccine. This powder
is dissolved in the solvent provided, just before injection.
Menitorix is available in packs of 1 or 10 with 2 or 20 separate needles or without needles.
Not all pack sizes may be marketed.
Marketing Authorisation Holder: SmithKline Beecham Ltd, Stockley Park West, Uxbridge,
Middlesex UB11 1BT
Manufacturer: GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals s.a., Rixensart, Belgium
This medicinal product is authorised in the Member States of the EEA under the
following names:
Belgium, Ireland, Poland, United Kingdom
Menitorix
Other formats
To listen to or request a copy of this leaflet in Braille, large print or audio please call, free of charge:
 8.2QO\
Please be ready to give the following information:
Product name
Menitorix
5HIHUHQFHQXPEHU

This is a service provided by the Royal National Institute of Blind People.
This leaflet was last revised in 11/2015
Menitorix is a registered trade mark of the GSK group of companies
© 2015 GSK group of companies. All rights reserved.

The following information is intended for healthcare professionals only
Menitorix®
powder and solvent for solution for injection
Haemophilus type b and Meningococcal group C conjugate vaccine
Menitorix must be reconstituted by adding the entire contents of the pre-filled syringe of solvent to the vial containing the powder.
To attach the needle to the syringe, refer to the drawing. However, the syringe provided with Menitorix might be slightly different (without screw thread) than the syringe described in the drawing. In that case, the needle
should be attached without screwing.
1. Holding the syringe Syringe
2. To attach the
3. Remove the needle Needle
Syringe barrel
barrel in one hand
needle to the
protector, which
Needle protector
(avoid holding the
syringe, twist the
on occasion can be
syringe plunger),
needle clockwise
a little stiff
unscrew the syringe
into the syringe
cap by twisting it
until you feel it
anticlockwise.
lock. (see picture)
Syringe plunger
Syringe cap
Add the solvent to the powder. After the addition of the solvent to the powder, the mixture should be well shaken until the powder is completely dissolved in the solvent.
The reconstituted vaccine is a clear and colourless solution.
The reconstituted vaccine should be inspected visually for any foreign particulate matter and/or variation of physical aspect prior to administration. In the event of either being observed, discard the vaccine.
A new needle should be used to administer the vaccine.
Inject the entire contents of the vial.
After reconstitution, the vaccine should be administered promptly or kept in the refrigerator (2°C - 8°C). If it is not used within 24 hours, it should be discarded.
Experimental data show that the reconstituted vaccine could also be kept for up to 24 hours at ambient temperature (25°C). If it is not used within 24 hours, it should be discarded.
Any unused medicinal product or waste material should be disposed of in accordance with local requirements.
Menitorix is a registered trade mark of the GSK group of companies
© 2015 GSK group of companies. All rights reserved.

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Source: Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided here is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. This information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. If you have questions about the substances you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

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