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IBUPROFEN TABLETS 200MG

Active substance(s): IBUPROFEN / IBUPROFEN

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IBUPROFEN 200MG PIL- GSL :IBUPROFEN 200MG PIL -

148 X 290mm

00221215/02

12/14/15

PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET

IBUPROFEN 200MG TABLETS

Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start
taking this medicine because it contains
important information for you.
Always take this medicine exactly as described in
this leaflet or as your doctor or pharmacist or nurse
have told you.
• Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again.
• Ask your pharmacist if you need more
information or advice.
• If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor or
pharmacist or nurse. This includes any possible
side effects not listed in this leaflet.
• You must talk to a doctor if you do not feel
better or if you feel worse.

(myocardial infarction) or stroke. Any risk is
more likely with high doses and prolonged
treatment. Do not exceed the recommended dose
or duration of treatment (10 days) without
consulting your doctor or pharmacist.
If you have heart problems, previous stroke or
think that you may be at risk of these conditions
(for example if you have high blood pressure,
diabetes or high cholesterol or are a smoker), you
should discuss your treatment with your doctor or
pharmacist.
There is a risk of renal impairment in dehydrated
children and adolescents.

In this leaflet:

1. What Ibuprofen is and what it is used for
2. What you need to know before you take
Ibuprofen
3. How to take Ibuprofen Tablets
4. Possible side effects
5. How to store Ibuprofen Tablets
6. Contents of the pack and other information

1. What is Ibuprofen and what is it used
for





• Ibuprofen belongs to a group of drugs termed
Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs
(NSAIDs).
• Ibuprofen tablets are used for the relief of
rheumatic and muscular pain, backache,
neuralgia, migraine, headache, dental pain,
period pain, feverishness and the symptoms of
cold and flu.



DO NOT TAKE Ibuprofen if you:
• are allergic to Ibuprofen or any other
ingredients of the product (these are listed in
Section 6), aspirin or other related painkillers
• have or have had stomach ulcer, perforation or
bleeding
• are taking more than 75mg of aspirin a day
• suffer from severe liver, kidney or heart failure
• are in the last 3 months of pregnancy
Warnings and precautions
Talk to your doctor or pharmacist before taking
these tablets if you are:
• asthmatic or suffer from kidney, liver or bowel
problems
• taking a low dose aspirin (up to 75mg daily)
• suffering from systemic lupus erythematosus
(SLE) a condition of the immune system affecting connective tissue resulting in joint pain,
skin changes and disorders of other organs
• trying to become pregnant- ibuprofen belongs to
a group of medicines which may impair fertility
in women. This effect is reversible on stopping
the medicine. It is unlikely that Ibuprofen, used
occasionally will affect your chances of
becoming pregnant, however, tell your doctor
before taking this medicine, if you have
problems in becoming pregnant
• in the first 6 months of pregnancy



2. What you need to know before you take
Ibuprofen

Medicines such as Ibuprofen may be associated
with a small increased risk of heart attack










Other medicines and Ibuprofen
Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking,
have recently taken or might take any other
medicines, especially:
medication to help increase urine excretion
(water tablets e.g. furosemide)
any other painkillers (e.g. aspirin and other
NSAIDs) as it may increase the incidence of
unwanted reactions
medication to prevent blood clotting (e.g.
warfarin)
lithium (used in the treatment of certain mental
illnesses)
corticosteroids (used to treat various illnesses
that involve inflammation in the body e.g.
prednisolone, cortisone)
antihypertensive (medicines which lower your
blood pressure e.g. propranolol, atenolol,
metoprolol, prazosin, alfuzosin, terazosin)
methotrexate (medicines for treating cancer)
antiplatelet agents and selective serotonin
reuptake inhibitors
immunosuppressants (e.g. ciclosporin,
tacrolimus)
cardiac glycosides, such as digoxin, used to treat
heart conditions
quinoline antibiotics (e.g. ciprofloxacin)
mifepristone, zidovudine, cyclooxygenase-2
selective inhibitors

Pregnancy and breast-feeding
Ibuprofen belongs to a group of medicines which
may impair fertility in women. This effect is
reversible on stopping the medicine. The use of
Ibuprofen whilst pregnant or breast feeding
should be avoided. Ibuprofen should not be used
in the last three months of pregnancy and should
only be taken in the first six months of pregnancy
on the advice of your doctor.
Ibuprofen Tablets contains sucrose
If you have been told by your doctor that you
have an intolerance to some sugars, contact your
doctor before taking this medicine as it contains
sucrose.

3. How to take Ibuprofen

Always take this medicine exactly as described in
this leaflet or as your doctor or pharmacist or nurse
have told you. Check with your doctor or
pharmacist or nurse if you are not sure.
Adults, the elderly and children 12 years and
over: 1 to 2 tablets, as required to be taken up to 3
times daily with or after food. Do not take more

4:59 P

IBUPROFEN 200MG PIL- GSL :IBUPROFEN 200MG PIL -

than 6 tablets in 24 hours. Leave at least 4 hours
between each dose.
This product is intended for short term use only.
You should take the lowest dose for the shortest
time necessary to relieve your symptoms. You
should not take these tablets for longer than 10
days unless your doctor tells you to. If symptoms
persist or worsen consult your doctor. If in
adolescents this medicinal product is required for
more than 3 days, or if symptoms worsen a doctor
should be consulted.

Do not give to children under the age of 12
years.

If you take more tablets than you should
If you take too many tablets, contact your doctor
or hospital immediately. Bring any remaining
tablets with you to show the doctor.
Symptoms of overdose: headache, drowsiness,
low blood pressure, sickness.

If you forget to take a dose
If you forget to take a dose, take as soon as you
remember, unless it is almost time for your next
dose. If it is, do not take the missed dose at all.
Never double up on a dose to make up for the one
you have missed.

4. Possible side effects

Like all medicines, your medicine can cause side
effects, although not everybody gets them. The
following side effects are very rare (less than 1 in
10,000 people) but if you experience any of the
effects then STOP TAKING this medicine
immediately and contact your doctor or pharmacist.
• Severe allergic reactions: symptoms could
include dizziness or fainting, faster heart rate,
swelling of the face, tongue and throat.
• Severe skin reactions (Steven’s JohnsonSyndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis):
symptoms could include blistering of the skin,
mouth, eyes and genitals. Skin rash, easy bruising
or bleeding from the skin or nose.
• Peptic ulceration or perforation: symptoms
could include severe abdominal pain, vomiting
blood (or liquid with what looks like coffee
grounds), blood in the faeces (stools/ motions) or
passing black tarry stools.
• Inflammation of the brain lining: symptoms
could include stiff neck, feeling or being sick,
fever or feeling disorientated.
• Worsening of asthma and wheezing or difficulty
in breathing.
If you experience any of the above mentioned side
effects then STOP TAKING this medicine
immediately and contact your doctor or pharmacist.
Other possible side effects
Less than 1 in 100 people may experience the
following uncommon side effects:
• allergic reactions such as hives, skin rashes and
itching (or SLE)
• stomach: abdominal pain, indigestion, heartburn
and feeling sick
• nervous system: headache

Less than 1 in 1000 people may experience the
following rare side effects:
• diarrhoea, constipation, wind and being sick

Less than 1 in 10,000 people may experience the
following very rare side effects:
• reduction in blood cells, which can make the skin
and/or eye pale or yellow, sore throat, mild
mouth ulcers, flu like symptoms, exhaustion or






148 X 290mm

00221215/02

12/14/15

weakness, high blood pressure, heart failure or
chest pain
nervousness, visual disturbance, ringing in the
ears and vertigo
unexpected sensitivity of the skin to the sun
liver problems: symptoms could include
yellowing of the skin or the whites of the eyes
kidney problems: symptoms could include
swelling of the ankles, fluid retention

Medicines such as Ibuprofen may be associated
with a small increased risk of heart attack
(myocardial infarction) or stroke.

If any of the side effects mentioned get serious or if
you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet,
contact your doctor or pharmacist.

Also you can help to make sure that medicines
remain as safe as possible by reporting any
unwanted side effects via the internet at
www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard. Alternatively you
can call Freephone 0808 100 3352 (available from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mondays to Fridays) or fill in a
paper form available from your local pharmacy.

5. How to store Ibuprofen

• This medicine should not be used after the
“expiry date” printed on the pack.
• Store in a cool and dry place protected from light.
• Do not store above 30°C. Do not freeze.

Keep all medicines out of the sight and
reach of children.

Do not throw away any medicines via wastewater
or household waste. Ask your pharmacist how to
throw away medicines you no longer use. These
measures will help to protect the environment.

6. Contents of the pack and other
information

What Ibuprofen 200mg tablets contain
• The active substance (the ingredient that makes
the tablet work) is Ibuprofen. Each tablet
contains 200mg of the active ingredient
Ibuprofen BP.
• The other ingredients are pregelatinised starch,
maize starch, povidone, sodium lauryl sulphate,
silicon dioxide, magnesium stearate, sucrose,
purified talc, titanium dioxide and erythrosine
aluminium lake (E127), bees wax (white),
carnauba wax.

What Ibuprofen tablets look like and
contents of the pack
• Ibuprofen 200mg are pink sugar coated tablets.
• The pack sizes are 12 and 16 tablets in blister
packs. Not all pack sizes may be marketed.

The Marketing Authorization Holder and
company responsible for manufacture:
Pharmvit Ltd, 177 Bilton Road, Perivale,
Greenford, Middlesex, UB6 7HQ.
Telephone: 0208 997 5444
Fax:
0208 997 5433

To request a copy of this leaflet in large print or
audio format, please contact the licence holder at
the address (or telephone, fax) above.
PL 04556 / 0022

Reference: 00221215/02

Date leaflet last revised: December 2015

GSL

4:59 P

IBUPROFEN 200MG PIL- P :00221215/02

148 X 290

12/14/15

5:13 PM

Page 1

PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET

IBUPROFEN 200MG TABLETS

Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start
taking this medicine because it contains
important information for you.
Always take this medicine exactly as described in
this leaflet or as your doctor or pharmacist or nurse
have told you.
• Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again.
• Ask your pharmacist if you need more
information or advice.
• If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor or
pharmacist or nurse. This includes any possible
side effects not listed in this leaflet.
• You must talk to a doctor if you do not feel
better or if you feel worse.

(myocardial infarction) or stroke. Any risk is
more likely with high doses and prolonged
treatment. Do not exceed the recommended dose
or duration of treatment (10 days) without
consulting your doctor or pharmacist.
If you have heart problems, previous stroke or
think that you may be at risk of these conditions
(for example if you have high blood pressure,
diabetes or high cholesterol or are a smoker), you
should discuss your treatment with your doctor or
pharmacist.
There is a risk of renal impairment in dehydrated
children and adolescents.

In this leaflet:

1. What Ibuprofen is and what it is used for
2. What you need to know before you take
Ibuprofen
3. How to take Ibuprofen Tablets
4. Possible side effects
5. How to store Ibuprofen Tablets
6. Contents of the pack and other information

1. What is Ibuprofen and what is it used
for

• Ibuprofen belongs to a group of drugs termed
Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs
(NSAIDs).
• Ibuprofen Tablets can be used to treat painful
conditions such as rheumatic or muscular pain,
pain of non-serious arthritis, backache, neuralgia,
migraine, headache, dental pain, dysmenorrhoea,
feverishness, symptoms of cold and flu.

2. What you need to know before you take
Ibuprofen














DO NOT TAKE Ibuprofen if you:
are allergic to Ibuprofen or any other
ingredients of the product (these are listed in
Section 6), aspirin or other related painkillers.
have or have had stomach ulcer, perforation or
bleeding
are taking more than 75mg of aspirin a day
suffer from severe liver, kidney or heart failure
are in the last 3 months of pregnancy

Warnings and precautions
Talk to your doctor or pharmacist before taking
these tablets if you are:
asthmatic or suffer from kidney, liver or bowel
problems
taking a low dose aspirin (up to 75mg daily)
suffering from systemic lupus erythematosus
(SLE) a condition of the immune system
affecting connective tissue resulting in joint pain,
skin changes and disorders of other organs
trying to become pregnant- ibuprofen belongs to
a group of medicines which may impair fertility
in women. This effect is reversible on stopping
the medicine. It is unlikely that Ibuprofen, used
occasionally will affect your chances of
becoming pregnant, however, tell your doctor
before taking this medicine, if you have
problems in becoming pregnant
in the first 6 months of pregnancy
Medicines such as Ibuprofen may be associated
with a small increased risk of heart attack











Other medicines and Ibuprofen
Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking,
have recently taken or might take any other
medicines, especially:
medication to help increase urine excretion
(water tablets e.g. furosemide)
any other painkillers (e.g. aspirin and other
NSAIDs) as it may increase the incidence of
unwanted reactions
medication to prevent blood clotting (e.g.
warfarin)
lithium (used in the treatment of certain mental
illnesses)
corticosteroids (used to treat various illnesses
that involve inflammation in the body e.g.
prednisolone, cortisone)
antihypertensive (medicines which lower your
blood pressure e.g. propranolol, atenolol,
metoprolol, prazosin, alfuzosin, terazosin)
methotrexate (medicines for treating cancer)
antiplatelet agents and selective serotonin
reuptake inhibitors
immunosuppressants (e.g. ciclosporin,
tacrolimus)

• cardiac glycosides, such as digoxin, used to treat
heart conditions
• quinoline antibiotics (e.g. ciprofloxacin)

• mifepristone, zidovudine, cyclooxygenase-2
selective inhibitors

Pregnancy and breast-feeding
Ibuprofen belongs to a group of medicines which
may impair fertility in women. This effect is
reversible on stopping the medicine. The use of
Ibuprofen whilst pregnant or breast feeding
should be avoided. Ibuprofen should not be used
in the last three months of pregnancy and should
only be taken in the first six months of pregnancy
on the advice of your doctor.
Ibuprofen Tablets contains sucrose
If you have been told by your doctor that you
have an intolerance to some sugars, contact your
doctor before taking this medicine as it contains
sucrose.

3. How to take Ibuprofen

Always take this medicine exactly as described in
this leaflet or as your doctor or pharmacist or nurse
have told you. Check with your doctor or
pharmacist or nurse if you are not sure.
Adults, the elderly and children 12 years and
over: 1 to 2 tablets, as required to be taken up to 3
times daily with or after food. Do not take more
than 6 tablets in 24 hours. Leave at least 4 hours
between each dose.

IBUPROFEN 200MG PIL- P :00221215/02

This product is intended for short term use only.
You should take the lowest dose for the shortest
time necessary to relieve your symptoms. You
should not take these tablets for longer than 10
days unless your doctor tells you to. If symptoms
persist or worsen consult your doctor. If in
adolescents this medicinal product is required for
more than 3 days, or if symptoms worsen a doctor
should be consulted.

Do not give to children under the age of 12
years.

If you take more tablets than you should
If you take too many tablets, contact your doctor
or hospital immediately. Bring any remaining
tablets with you to show the doctor.
Symptoms of overdose: headache, drowsiness,
low blood pressure, sickness.

If you forget to take a dose
If you forget to take a dose, take as soon as you
remember, unless it is almost time for your next
dose. If it is, do not take the missed dose at all.
Never double up on a dose to make up for the one
you have missed.

4. Possible side effects

Like all medicines, your medicine can cause side
effects, although not everybody gets them. The
following side effects are very rare (less than 1 in
10,000 people) but if you experience any of the
effects then STOP TAKING this medicine
immediately and contact your doctor or pharmacist.
• Severe allergic reactions: symptoms could
include dizziness or fainting, faster heart rate,
swelling of the face, tongue and throat.
• Severe skin reactions (Steven’s JohnsonSyndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis):
symptoms could include blistering of the skin,
mouth, eyes and genitals. Skin rash, easy bruising
or bleeding from the skin or nose.
• Peptic ulceration or perforation: symptoms
could include severe abdominal pain, vomiting
blood (or liquid with what looks like coffee
grounds), blood in the faeces (stools/ motions) or
passing black tarry stools.
• Inflammation of the brain lining: symptoms
could include stiff neck, headache, feeling or
being sick, fever or feeling disorientated.
• Worsening of asthma and wheezing or difficulty
in breathing.
If you experience any of the above mentioned side
effects then STOP TAKING this medicine
immediately and contact your doctor or pharmacist.
Other possible side effects
Less than 1 in 100 people may experience the
following uncommon side effects:
• allergic reactions such as hives, skin rashes and
itching (or SLE)
• stomach: abdominal pain, indigestion, heartburn
and feeling sick
• nervous system: headache

Less than 1 in 1000 people may experience the
following rare side effects:
• diarrhoea, constipation, wind and being sick

Less than 1 in 10,000 people may experience the
following very rare side effects:
• reduction in blood cells, which can make the skin
and/or eye pale or yellow, cause fever, sore
throat, mild mouth ulcers, flu like symptoms,
exhaustion or weakness
• high blood pressure, heart failure or chest pain

148 X 290

12/14/15

5:13 PM

Page 2

• nervousness, visual disturbance, ringing in the
ears and vertigo
• unexpected sensitivity of the skin to the sun
• liver problems: symptoms could include
yellowing of the skin or the whites of the eyes
• kidney problems: symptoms could include
swelling of the ankles, fluid retention

Medicines such as Ibuprofen may be associated
with a small increased risk of heart attack
(myocardial infarction) or stroke.

If any of the side effects mentioned get serious or if
you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet,
contact your doctor or pharmacist.
Also you can help to make sure that medicines
remain as safe as possible by reporting any
unwanted side effects via the internet at
www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard. Alternatively you
can call Freephone 0808 100 3352 (available from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mondays to Fridays) or fill in a
paper form available from your local pharmacy.

5. How to store Ibuprofen

• This medicine should not be used after the
“expiry date” printed on the pack.
• Store in a cool and dry place protected from light.
• Do not store above 30°C. Do not freeze.

Keep all medicines out of the sight and
reach of children.

Do not throw away any medicines via wastewater
or household waste. Ask your pharmacist how to
throw away medicines you no longer use. These
measures will help to protect the environment.

6. Contents of the pack and other
information

What Ibuprofen 200mg tablets contain
• The active substance (the ingredient that makes
the tablet work) is Ibuprofen. Each tablet
contains 200mg of the active ingredient
Ibuprofen BP.
• The other ingredients are pregelatinised starch,
maize starch, povidone, sodium lauryl sulphate,
silicon dioxide, magnesium stearate, sucrose,
purified talc, titanium dioxide and erythrosine
aluminium lake (E127), bees wax (white),
carnauba wax.

What Ibuprofen tablets look like and
contents of the pack
• Ibuprofen 200mg are pink sugar coated tablets.
• The pack sizes are “25, 50, 100 tablets in plastic
containers and 24, 48, 84 and 96” tablets in
blister packs.

The Marketing Authorization Holder and
company responsible for manufacture:
Pharmvit Ltd, 177 Bilton Road, Perivale,
Greenford, Middlesex, UB6 7HQ.
Telephone: 0208 997 5444
Fax:
0208 997 5433

To request a copy of this leaflet in large print or
audio format, please contact the licence holder at
the address (or telephone, fax) above.
PL 04556 / 0022

Reference: 00221215/02

Date leaflet last revised: December 2015

P

IBUPROFEN 200MG PIL- POM:00221215/02

148 X 290

12/14/15

5:37 PM

Page 1

PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET

IBUPROFEN 200MG TABLETS

Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start
taking this medicine because it contains
important information for you.
• Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again.
• If you have any further questions, ask your doctor
or pharmacist.
• This medicine has been prescribed for you. Do
not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if
their symptoms are the same as yours.
• If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor or
pharmacist or nurse. This includes any possible
side effects not listed in this leaflet.
In this leaflet:
1. What Ibuprofen is and what it is used for
2. What you need to know before you take
Ibuprofen
3. How to take Ibuprofen Tablets
4. Possible side effects
5. How to store Ibuprofen Tablets
6. Contents of the pack and other information

1. What is Ibuprofen and what is it used for
• Ibuprofen belongs to a group of drugs termed
Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs
(NSAIDs).
• Ibuprofen is used for its anti-inflammatory and
analgesic effect in the treatment of rheumatoid
arthritis (including juvenile rheumatoid
arthritis or still’s diseases), ankylosing
spondylitis, osteoarthritis and other nonrheumatoid (seronegative) arthropathies.

2. What you need to know before you take
Ibuprofen

DO NOT TAKE Ibuprofen if you:
• are allergic to Ibuprofen or any other
ingredients of the product (these are listed in
Section 6), aspirin or other related painkillers
• have or have had stomach ulcer, perforation
or bleeding
• are taking more than 75mg of aspirin a day
• suffer from severe liver, kidney or heart
failure
• are in the last 3 months of pregnancy
Warnings and precautions
Talk to your doctor or pharmacist before taking
these tablets if you are:
• asthmatic or suffer from kidney, liver or bowel
problems
• suffering from systemic lupus erythematosus
(SLE) a condition of the immune system
affecting connective tissue resulting in joint
pain, skin changes and disorders of other
organs
• trying to become pregnant- ibuprofen belongs
to a group of medicines which may impair
fertility in women. This effect is reversible on
stopping the medicine. It is unlikely that
Ibuprofen, used occasionally will affect your
chances of becoming pregnant, however, tell
your doctor before taking this medicine, if you
have problems in becoming pregnant
• you are in the first 6 months of pregnancy
Medicines such as Ibuprofen may be associated
with a small increased risk of heart attack
(myocardial infarction) or stroke. Any risk is
more likely with high doses and prolonged
treatment. Do not exceed the recommended dose

or duration of treatment (10 days) without
consulting your doctor or pharmacist.

If you have heart problems, previous stroke or
think that you may be at risk of these conditions
(for example if you have high blood pressure,
diabetes or high cholesterol or are a smoker), you
should discuss your treatment with your doctor or
pharmacist.
There is a risk of renal impairment in dehydrated
children and adolescents.
Other medicines and Ibuprofen
Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking,
have recently taken or might take any other
medicines, especially:
• medication to help increase urine excretion
(water tablets e.g. furosemide)
• any other painkillers (e.g. aspirin and other
NSAIDs) as it may increase the incidence of
unwanted reactions
• medication to prevent blood clotting (e.g.
warfarin)
• lithium (used in the treatment of certain mental
illnesses)
• corticosteroids (used to treat various illnesses
that involve inflammation in the body e.g.
prednisolone, cortisone)
• antihypertensive (medicines which lower your
blood pressure e.g. propranolol, atenolol,
metoprolol, prazosin, alfuzosin, terazosin)
• methotrexate (medicines for treating cancer)
• anti platelet agents and selective serotonin
reuptake inhibitors
• lithium, ciclosporin, mifepristone, quinoline
antibiotics, tacrolimus, zidovudine, cardiac
glycosides, cyclooxygenase-2 selective
inhibitors
Driving and using machines
Dizziness, drowsiness, fatigue, visual
disturbances or headaches are possible
undesirable effects after taking NSAIDs. If
affected, patients should not drive or operate
machinery.
Pregnancy and breast-feeding
Ibuprofen belongs to a group of medicines which
may impair fertility in women. This effect is
reversible on stopping the medicine. The use of
Ibuprofen whilst pregnant or breast feeding
should be avoided. Ibuprofen should not be used
in the last three months of pregnancy and should
only be taken in the first six months of pregnancy
on the advice of your doctor.
Ibuprofen Tablets contains sucrose
If you have been told by your doctor that you
have an intolerance to some sugars, contact your
doctor before taking this medicine as it contains
sucrose.

3. How to take Ibuprofen

You should take your medicine as directed by your
doctor. The pharmacist’s label should tell you how
much to take and how often. If it does not or you
are not sure ask your doctor or pharmacist.
Leave at least 4 hours between each dose.
Adult: The recommended initial dose of Ibuprofen
is 1200mg daily in divided doses.
Some patients can be maintained on 600–1200mg
daily. It can be advantageous in severe conditions
to increase the dosage to 1600mg daily in divided

IBUPROFEN 200MG PIL- POM:00221215/02

148 X 290

doses until the acute phase is brought under
control.
Elderly: The elderly are at increased risk of the
serious consequences of adverse reactions. If an
NSAID is considered necessary, the lowest dose
should be used and for the shortest possible
duration. The patient should be monitored regularly
for GI bleeding during NSAID therapy.
Children: 20mg of Ibuprofen per kg of body
weight daily, except that in children weighing less
than 30 kg, the total of Ibuprofen given in 24 hours
should not exceed 500mg.
If you forget to take a dose:
If you forget to take a tablet, take as soon as you
remember, then go on as before. Do not take a
double dose to make up for a forgotten dose.
If you take more tablets than you should:
If you take too many tablets, contact your doctor
or hospital immediately. Bring any remaining
tablets with you to show the doctor.
Symptoms of overdose: Headache, drowsiness,
low blood pressure, sickness.

4. Possible side effects

Like all medicines, your medicine can cause side
effects, although not everybody gets them. The
following side effects are very rare (less than 1 in
10,000 people) but if you experience any of the
effects then STOP TAKING this medicine
immediately and contact your doctor or pharmacist:
• severe allergic reactions: symptoms could
include dizziness or fainting, faster heart rate,
swelling of the face, tongue and throat
• severe skin reactions (Steven’s JohnsonSyndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis):
symptoms could include blistering of the skin,
mouth, eyes and genitals. Skin rash, easy
bruising or bleeding, from the skin or nose
• peptic ulceration or perforation: symptoms
could include severe abdominal pain, vomiting
blood (or liquid with what looks like coffee
grounds), blood in the faeces (stools / motions)
or passing black tarry stools
• inflammation of the brain lining: symptoms
could include stiff neck, severe headache,
feeling or being sick, fever or feeling
disorientated
• worsening of asthma and wheezing or
difficulty in breathing
If you experience any of the above mentioned side
effects then STOP TAKING this medicine
immediately and contact your doctor or pharmacist
Other possible side effects:
Less than 1 in 100 people may experience the
following uncommon side effects:
• allergic reactions such as hives, skin rashes
and itching (or SLE)
• stomach: abdominal pain, indigestion,
heartburn and feeling sick
• nervous system: headache
Less than 1 in 1000 people may experience the
following rare side effects:
• diarrhoea, constipation, wind and being sick
Less than 1 in 10,000 people may experience the
following very rare side effects:
• reduction in blood cells, which can make the
skin and/or eye pale or yellow, sore throat,
mild mouth ulcers, flu like symptoms,
exhaustion or weakness
• high blood pressure, heart failure or chest
pain

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• nervousness, visual disturbance, ringing in the
ears and vertigo
• unexpected sensitivity of the skin to the sun
• liver problems: symptoms could include
yellowing of the skin or the whites of the eyes
• kidney problems: symptoms could include
swelling of the ankles, fluid retention
Medicines such as Ibuprofen may be associated
with a small increased risk of heart attack
(myocardial infarction) or stroke.
If any of the side effects mentioned get serious or
if you notice any side effects not listed in this
leaflet, contact your doctor or pharmacist.
Also you can help to make sure that medicines
remain as safe as possible by reporting any
unwanted side effects via the internet at
www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard. Alternatively you
can call Freephone 0808 100 3352 (available
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mondays to Fridays) or
fill in a paper form available from your local
pharmacy.

5. How to store Ibuprofen

• This medicine should not be used after the
expiry date printed on the pack.
• Store in a cool and dry place protected from
light.
• Do not store above 30°C. Do not freeze.

Keep all medicines out of the sight and
reach of children

Do not throw away any medicines via wastewater
or household waste. Ask your pharmacist how to
throw away medicines you no longer use. These
measures will help to protect the environment.

6. Contents of the pack and other
information

What Ibuprofen 200mg tablets contain:
• The active substance (the ingredient that
makes the tablet work) is Ibuprofen. Each
tablet contains 200mg of the active ingredient
Ibuprofen BP.
• The other ingredients are pregelatinised
starch, maize starch, povidone, sodium lauryl
sulphate, Silicon Dioxide, magnesium
stearate, sucrose, purified talc, titanium
dioxide and erythrosine aluminium lake
(E127), bees wax (white), carnauba wax.
What Ibuprofen tablets look like and
contents of the pack:
• Ibuprofen 200mg are pink sugar coated
tablets.
Ibuprofen 200mg tablets are available in pack
size of 500 in plastic container.

The Marketing Authorization Holder and
company responsible for manufacture:
Pharmvit Ltd, 177 Bilton Road, Perivale,
Greenford, Middlesex, UB6 7HQ.
Telephone: 0208 997 5444
Fax:
0208 997 5433

To request a copy of this leaflet in large print or
audio format or additional copies, please contact
the licence holder at the address (or telephone, fax)
above.
PL 04556 / 0022

Reference: 00221215/02

POM

Date leaflet last revised: December 2015

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Source: Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided here is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. This information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. If you have questions about the substances you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

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