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GLIPIZIDE TABLETS 5MG

Active substance(s): GLIPIZIDE

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Glipizide 5 mg Tablets

Read all of this leaflet carefully before
you start taking this medicine because it
contains important information for you.
• Keep this leaflet. You may need to read
it again.
• If you have any further questions, ask
your doctor or pharmacist.
• This medicine has been prescribed for you
only. Do not pass it on to others. It may
harm them, even if their signs of illness
are the same as yours.
• If you get any side effects talk to your
doctor or pharmacist. This includes any
possible side effects not listed in this
leaflet. See section 4.

What is in this leaflet:
1. What Glipizide is and what it is used for
2. What you need to know before you
take Glipizide
3. How to take Glipizide
4. Possible side effects
5. How to store Glipizide
6. Contents of the pack and other information

1. What Glipizide is and what it is
used for
Glipizide is one of a group of medicines
called sulfonylureas. Glipizide is used to
reduce blood sugar levels (antidiabetic
medicine taken by mouth).
Glipizide is used in a certain form of
diabetes (type 2 diabetes mellitus), when
diet, exercise and weight loss alone do not
have an adequate effect.

2. What you need to know before you
take Glipizide
Do not take Glipizide if you:
• are allergic to glipizide, other sulfonylureas
or any of the other ingredients of this
medicine (listed in section 6)
• suffer from kidney or liver disease
• suffer from thyroid problems
• have insulin-dependent diabetes (also
called “juvenile onset” or “Type I” diabetes)
• have diabetic ketoacidosis (a complication
of diabetes with rapid weight loss, feeling
or being sick), especially if this has ever led
to unconsciousness or a coma
• are taking miconazole to treat a
fungal infection
• are pregnant, are planning to become
pregnant or are breast feeding
Warnings and precautions
Talk to your doctor or pharmacist before
taking Glipizide if:
• it is planned that you will have surgery in
the near future
• you are suffering from stress or have an
infection or fever
• you have recently had a traumatic injury
(if you are receiving treatment for an
accident tell your doctor you have been
given these tablets)
• you have been told that your adrenal or
pituitary glands are not working properly

TBC
1111121

In the above cases, your doctor may
change the number of tablets you should
take or he/she may revise your entire
treatment plan.
Lowering of the haemoglobin level and
breakdown of red blood cells (haemolytic
anaemia) can occur in patients missing
the enzyme glucose-6-phosphate
dehydrogenase (G6PD).

Control of your blood sugar levels
During Glipizide treatment, regular
checking of your blood (or urine) sugar
levels is necessary. Your doctor may also
perform certain blood tests to monitor your
progress. You should follow the treatment
plan prescribed by your doctor in order to
control your blood sugar levels. This means
that you should continue with your diabetic
diet, take regular exercise and if necessary,
lose weight.
In the first few weeks of treatment, there is a
greater risk of having low blood sugar levels
(hypoglycaemia). Your doctor will therefore
monitor your progress closely.

Low blood sugar levels may occur if:
• you have meals irregularly or you skip
meals altogether
• you are fasting
• you are elderly or in poor health
• you change your diet
• you increase your physical activity without
increasing your carbohydrate intake
• you drink alcohol (especially if you also
skip meals)
• you take certain other medicines at the same
time (see “Other medicines and Glipizide”)

If you suffer from low blood sugar levels,
you may have the following symptoms:
• headache
• hunger
• exhaustion
• feeling or being sick
• weariness
• sleepiness
• problems sleeping
• restlessness
• aggressiveness
• difficulty concentrating
• feeling less alert
• having slower reactions than normal
• depression
• confusion
• speech problems
• eyesight problems
• dizziness
• helplessness
• sweating
• clammy skin
• anxiety
• faster heart beat
• high blood pressure
• feeling of an abnormally strong, racing or
irregular heartbeat (palpitations)
• sudden strong pain in the chest (angina)
If your blood sugar levels continue to
drop, you may suffer from considerable
confusion (delirium), you may develop “fits”
(convulsions), have breathing difficulties,
your heartbeat may slow down and you
may fall unconscious.
In most cases, the signs of reduced blood
sugar vanish very quickly when you eat or
drink something sugary e.g. sugar cubes,
sweet juice, sweetened tea. You should
always carry some form of sugar with you.
Remember that artificial sweeteners are not
effective. Please contact your doctor or
hospital if taking sugar does not help or if
any of these symptoms return.

Other medicines and Glipizide
Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are
taking, have recently taken or might take
any other medicines, including medicines
obtained without a prescription.
Taking the following medicines with
Glipizide may reduce your blood sugar
levels too much:
• Insulin or another medicine to control
your diabetes
• Antibiotics to treat an infection (e.g.
sulfonamides, chloramphenicol)
• NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory
medicines e.g. aspirin or ibuprofen), used
to treat pain and/or inflammation
• Medicines to thin the blood (e.g. warfarin
and other coumarins)
• Medicines to treat fungal infections (e.g.
fluconazole or voriconazole)
• Certain medicines to treat high blood
pressure called beta-blockers (e.g.
atenolol, propranolol)
• Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs, e.g.
moclobemide, used to treat depression)
• Medicines to treat gout (e.g. probenecid)
• Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)
inhibitors (e.g. captopril used to treat high
blood pressure)
• Cimetidine (used to treat stomach
or duodenal ulcers and other
digestive disorders)
• Fibrates (e.g. clofibrate used to treat
high cholesterol)
Taking the following medicines with
Glipizide may increase your blood
sugar levels:
• Oral contraceptives (“the pill”) and
medicines containing oestrogen
or progesterone
• “Water tablets” (also known as diuretics)
• Medicines to treat thyroid disorders
• Medicines to treat inflammation
called corticosteroids
(e.g. hydrocortisone, prednisolone)
• Medicines called phenothiazines (e.g.
chlorpromazine), used to treat sickness or
some mental illnesses
• Medicines to treat tuberculosis
(e.g. isoniazid)
• Certain medicines to treat high blood
pressure and heart problems, called
calcium channel blocking drugs
(e.g. verapamil, nifedipine, diltiazem)
• Medicines to lower fat levels in the blood
(e.g. nicotinic acid)
• Certain medicines for treating asthma
(e.g. salbutamol) and blocked nose
(e.g. ephedrine)
• Phenytoin (used to treat epilepsy)
• Danazol (a hormone treatment)
Glipizide with alcohol
You should not drink alcohol while being
treated with this medicine. Drinking alcohol
can upset the control of your diabetes.

Date: 16 Mar 2015
Description Glipizide 5 mg 28

No. of colours

Component Type Leaflet

Pharma Code TBC

Affiliate Item Code 598525

SAP No. N/A

Superceded Affiliate Item Code 521715
TrackWise PR No. 598525
MA No. 04569/0308
Packing Site/Printer N/A
Supplier Code LT1324AI
Sign-offs

Vendor Job No. 249804
Proof No. 1
Client Market UK
Keyline/Drawing No. N/A
Barcode Info N/A

TBC
1111121

Package leaflet: Information for the patient

Colours

1

Time: 14:13
Page Count

1/2

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Non-Print
Colours
Equate CMYK
with
Main Font Myriad Pro
Dimensions 170 x 480 mm

Body Text Size 10.5 pt

Pregnancy and breast-feeding
Glipizide must not be taken during
pregnancy or if you are breast-feeding (see
section 2, “Do not take Glipizide”). If you
are pregnant, think you may be pregnant
or are planning to have a baby, ask your
doctor or pharmacist for advice before
taking this medicine.
Driving and using machines
Do not drive or operate machinery if you
feel dizzy, drowsy, suffer from headaches or
have difficulty concentrating after taking
this medicine.
Glipizide contains lactose. If your doctor
has told you that you have an intolerance to
some sugars, such as lactose, contact your
doctor before taking this medicine.

3. How to take Glipizide
Always take this medicine exactly as your
doctor or pharmacist has told you. Check
with your doctor or pharmacist if you are
not sure.

Glipizide should be taken about 30
minutes before a meal.
Adults
The recommended dose is one tablet (5 mg)
before breakfast or one tablet (5 mg) before
the midday meal. Depending on how your
blood sugar level responds, your doctor
may gradually increase your dose by half
to one tablet up to a maximum of four
tablets (20 mg) a day. The tablets can be
divided into equal doses. If you are taking
more than three tablets (15 mg) a day, your
doctor will split your dose so that you take
your tablets twice a day.
Elderly patients, patients with poor diets
and patients with kidney or liver disease
Your doctor may start you on the lower
dose of half a tablet (2.5 mg) a day before
gradually increasing your dose, as you may
be more sensitive to the effects of Glipizide.
If you are already taking a medicine to treat
your diabetes (e.g. tolbutamide) or more
than 20 units of Insulin a day, and your
doctor wants to change your medicine
to Glipizide Tablets, your blood sugar
level will need to be closely monitored.
This is to ensure that you do not suffer
the unwanted effects of low blood sugar
levels (hypoglycaemia).
If your doctor feels that Glipizide Tablets
are not sufficiently controlling your blood
sugar levels, he may also prescribe another
medicine (e.g. metformin) for you to take
as well.

Use in children
Glipizide is not recommended for use
in children.
If you take more Glipizide than
you should
If you have taken too many tablets,
this will cause your blood sugar level
to drop too low (hypoglycaemia - for
signs of hypoglycaemia see section 2).
If left untreated, this can lead to fainting
and coma.
You should eat or drink something sugary
as soon as you can (e.g. sugar cubes,
sweet juice, sweetened tea) and tell your
doctor immediately.
If you forget to take Glipizide
Take the next dose as soon as you
remember or feel faint, otherwise your
blood sugar level will become too high and
you may go into a coma (unconscious).
Do not take a double dose to make up for a
forgotten dose.
If you stop taking Glipizide
This will make your diabetes worse.
Talk to your doctor before you stop
taking Glipizide.
If you have any further questions on the
use of this medicine, ask your doctor
or pharmacist.

4. Possible side effects
Like all medicines, this medicine can cause
side effects, although not everybody
gets them.
Tell your doctor immediately if you
experience any of the following symptoms
after taking this medicine:
• An allergic reaction such as wheeziness,
difficulty breathing or swelling of the
eyelids, face or lips
• Allergic skin reactions including rashes,
eczema, hives (nettle rash) and red, itchy skin
• Reductions in blood cells and blood
platelets. This can make the skin pale
yellow, cause weakness or breathlessness,
or make bruising, bleeding or infections
more likely.

• Liver inflammation which can cause
nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, feeling
generally unwell, fever, itching, light
coloured bowel movements, dark coloured
urine and jaundice which causes yellowing
of the skin and whites of the eyes.
• A blood pigment disorder. This can cause
blistering or peeling of skin exposed to
sunlight, skin darkening or excessive
hair growth
In some people, a sudden, severe reaction
to alcohol can occur. You may experience a
sudden ‘hangover’ feeling with a throbbing
headache, flushed skin, increased heart rate,
shortness of breath, feeling or being sick,
vision problems, confusion and low blood
pressure which may make you dizzy especially
on standing up from lying or sitting.

Other side effects that may occur include:
Common (may affect up to 1 in 10 people)
• Low blood sugar (hypoglycaemia – for
signs of hypoglycaemia see section 2)
• Feeling sick, diarrhoea or stomach pains.
These side effects usually improve if your
doctor divides up your dosage during the day
Uncommon (may affect up to 1 in
100 people)
• Dizziness, drowsiness/sleepiness
• Shakiness (tremor) Blurred vision Being sick
Not known (frequency cannot be
estimated from the available data)
• Headache
• A reduction in your blood sodium. This can
occur if you are dehydrated.
• Confusion
• Double vision, changes in vision (you may
it more difficult to focus or see clearly)
• Constipation
• General feeling of being unwell
• Increased sensitivity of the skin to sunlight
The results of some laboratory tests have
been affected by this medicine but it is rare
for patients to have any symptoms.

Reporting of side effects
If you get any side effects talk to your
doctor or pharmacist. This includes any
possible side effects not listed in this leaflet.
You can also report side effects directly
via You can also report the side effects
directly via the Yellow Card Scheme at
www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard. By reporting
side effects you can help provide more
information on safety of this medicine.

5. How to store Glipizide
Keep this medicine out of the sight and
reach of children.
Do not use this medicine after the expiry
date which is stated on the carton after
“EXP”. The expiry date refers to the last day
of that month.
Store below 25°C and keep in the original
package in order to protect from light.
Do not throw away any medicines via
wastewater or household waste. Ask your
pharmacist how to throw away medicines
you no longer use. These measures will help
protect the environment.

6. Contents of the pack and
other information
What Glipizide contains
The active substance is glipizide. Each
tablet contains 5 mg of glipizide.
The other ingredients are lactose
monohydrate (see section 2, ‘Glipizide
contains lactose’), maize starch,
pregelatinised maize starch and stearic acid.
What Glipizide looks like and contents
of the pack
Tablets are white, oval, uncoated and
marked “GP” breakline “5” on one side and
“G” on the other side.
Glipizide Tablets are available in bottles of 20,
30, 50, 60, 100, 250 and 500 tablets and blister
packs of 20, 28, 30, 50, 56, 60 and 100 tablets.
Not all pack sizes may be marketed.
Marketing Authorisation Holder
Mylan
Potters Bar,
Hertfordshire,
EN6 1TL,
United Kingdom
Manufacturer
Gerard Laboratories,
35/36 Baldoyle Industrial Estate,
Grange Road,
Dublin 13,
Ireland
Generics [UK] Ltd. Potters Bar,
Hertfordshire,
EN6 1TL,
United Kingdom
This leaflet was last revised in
March 2015.

Date: 16 Mar 2015
Description Glipizide 5 mg 28

No. of colours

Component Type Leaflet

Pharma Code TBC

Affiliate Item Code 598525

SAP No. N/A

Superceded Affiliate Item Code 521715
TrackWise PR No. 598525
MA No. 04569/0308
Packing Site/Printer N/A
Supplier Code LT1324AI
Sign-offs

Vendor Job No. 249804
Proof No. 1
Client Market UK
Keyline/Drawing No. N/A
Barcode Info N/A

Colours

1

LT1324AI
598525

Time: 14:13
Page Count

2/2

Black

Non-Print
Colours
Equate CMYK
with
Main Font Myriad Pro
Dimensions 170 x 480 mm

Body Text Size 10.5 pt

Expand view ⇕

Source: Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided here is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. This information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. If you have questions about the substances you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

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