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GENTAMICIN 40MG/ML SOLUTION FOR INJECTION OR INFUSION

Active substance(s): GENTAMICIN SULPHATE

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PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET: INFORMATION FOR THE USER

GENTAMICIN 10MG/ML SOLUTION FOR INJECTION OR INFUSION
and
GENTAMICIN 40MG/ML SOLUTION FOR INJECTION OR INFUSION
Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start taking this medicine because it contains important information for you
• Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again
• If you have further questions, please ask your doctor or pharmacist
• This medicine has been prescribed for you only. Do not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if their signs of illness are the same as
yours
• If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor or pharmacist. This includes any possible side effects not listed in this leaflet. See section 4.
What is in this leaflet:
1. What gentamicin is and what it is used for
2. What you need to know before you take gentamicin
3. How to take gentamicin
4. Possible side effects
5. How to store gentamicin
6. Contents of the pack and other information

1. WHAT GENTAMICIN IS AND WHAT IT IS USED FOR
The name of this medicine is Gentamicin 10mg/ml Solution for
Injection or Infusion and Gentamicin 40mg/ml Solution for Injection or
Infusion (called “gentamicin” in this leaflet).
It contains a medicine called gentamicin sulfate. This belongs to a
group of antibiotics called aminoglycosides.
Gentamicin is used to treat infections caused by bacteria in adults and
children including new-borns. This includes infections in:
• Your urinary tract (including your kidneys or bladder)
• Your chest (including your lungs)
• Your blood – this is sometimes called ‘bacteraemia’
• Other serious infections

2. WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW BEFORE YOU TAKE
GENTAMICIN
Do not take Gentamicin if:
• You have Myasthenia Gravis. This is a disease that causes muscle
weakness
• You are allergic (hypersensitive) to gentamicin or to any of the other
ingredients of this medicine (listed in section 6). Signs of an allergic
reaction include: a rash, swallowing or breathing problems, swelling
of your lips, face, throat and tongue.
Do not take this medicine if any of the above applies to you. If you are
not sure, talk to your doctor or pharmacist before taking gentamicin.
Warning and precautions
Talk to your doctor or pharmacist before taking Gentamicin if:
• You are pregnant, might become pregnant, or think you may be
pregnant
• You are breast-feeding (see ‘Pregnancy and breast-feeding’ section
below)
• You have any muscle weakness problems
• You are extremely overweight
• You have kidney problems, are over 65 years of age
• You have pre-existing ear damage
• You experience severe diarrhoea.
Your infection might not respond to gentamicin if it did not respond to
other aminoglycosides and you may show an allergic reaction to
gentamicin if you are already allergic to another aminoglycoside.
There is only limited experience on once daily dosing of gentamicin in
elderly patients.
If you are not sure if any of the above applies to you, talk to your doctor
or pharmacist before taking gentamicin.
Children
If you are less than 1 year old your doctor will need to keep a careful
watch on you during your treatment to prevent damage to your ears.
He may check your hearing, your balance, how your kidneys are
working and the amount of gentamicin in your blood.
Other medicines and Gentamicin
Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking, have recently taken or
might take any other medicines. This is because gentamicin can affect
the way some other medicines work. Also, some medicines can affect
the way gentamicin works.
In particular tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following:
• Medicines used to thin the blood such as warfarin: concomitant use

of Gentamicin may increase their effects on the blood
• Medicines that may determine additional toxicity to kidneys and ear
damage:
Water tablets or injections (diuretics) such as furosemide or
etacrynic acid
Amphotericin B (used to treat fungal infections)
Cephalosporin antibiotics such as cephaloridine or other antibiotics
Ciclosporin (used in organ transplants or for severe skin problems)
Cisplatin (used to treat some cancers)
• Neostigmine or pyridostigmine (used to treat Myasthenia Gravis):
their use may contrast the effect of gentamicin
• Muscle relaxants and ether - sometimes used during operations
which need an anaesthetic: Gentamicin can enhance their effects on
nerve and muscle function
• Methoxyflurane: Gentamicin may increase its kidney damaging effect
• Carbenicillin: its use may decrease the quantity of gentamicin in the
blood in patients with pre-existing problems to kidneys
• Indometacin (used to treat pain or swelling): its use may increase the
quantity of gentamicin in the blood in neonates
• Bisphosphonates (used to treat osteoporosis): their use may increase
the risk of excessive quantity of calcium in the blood
• Botulinum toxin – used to lower the activity of overactive muscles.
This is also sometimes used in cosmetic procedures (botox).
These medicines may increase the chances of getting certain side
effects (see Section 4: Possible side effects). If you are unsure about
any of the above, consult your doctor.
Pregnancy and breast-feeding
Talk to your doctor before having this medicine if:
• You are pregnant, think you may be pregnant or plan to get
pregnant. Gentamicin should not normally be used during pregnancy
• You are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed.
Driving and using machines
Caution is advised when driving and using machines in view of the
possible undesired effects such as dizziness and vertigo.
Gentamicin 10 mg/ml contains sodium metabisulfite, which
may rarely cause severe allergic reactions and difficulty in breathing.
This medicine contains 0,78 mg of sodium per ampoule (less than
23 mg per ampoule), i.e. it is essentially sodium free.
Monitoring
To avoid adverse events, your doctor may consider monitoring hearing,
balance, and renal function before, during and after treatment and
serum gentamicin concentrations during therapy.

3. HOW TO TAKE GENTAMICIN
Gentamicin is always given to you by a doctor or nurse. It is usually
injected into a muscle but may also be injected into a vein in some
patients
If it is given into a vein, it can either be given as an injection or
dissolved with, e.g. saline or 5% glucose in water and given as a slow
injection via a drip (infusion).
Your doctor will decide how much to give you, depending on your
weight. The correct dose also depends on the type of infection and any
other illness you may have.
Blood samples will be taken by your doctor or nurse to check the dose
is right for you.
Always take this medicine exactly as your doctor or pharmacist has told
you. Check with your doctor or pharmacist if you are not sure.
The recommended dose is stated below and apply to both of the
medicines shown at the heading of this leaflet.
Adults
• The usual daily dose in adults is 3-5mg for each kg of body weight

INFORMATION FOR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS
The following information is intended for medical or healthcare
professionals only:
Monitoring
To avoid adverse events, continuous monitoring (before, during and
after treatment) of renal function (serum creatinin, creatinin
clearance), control of function of vestibule and cochlea as well as
hepatic and laboratory parameters is recommended.
In order to reduce the risk of nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity, the
following instructions should be considered:
– Regular assessment of auditory, vestibular and renal function is
particularly necessary in patients with additional risk factors.
Impaired hepatic function or auditory function, bacteraemia and
fever have been reported to increase the risk of ototoxicity. Volume
depletion or hypotension and liver disease have been reported as
additional risk factors for nephrotoxicity.

– Monitoring of renal function before, during and after treatment.
– Dosage strictly according to creatinine clearance (or serum
creatinine concentration). In patients with impaired renal function,
the dosage must be adjusted according to renal performance (see
section 4.2).
– In patients with impaired renal function additionally receiving
gentamicin locally (inhalation, intratracheal, instillation), the
amount of gentamicin absorbed after local administration must also
be taken into account for dose adjustment of systemic treatment.
– Monitoring of serum gentamicin concentrations during therapy in
order to avoid that peak levels exceed 10 µg/ml (toxic threshold for
the cochleo-vestibular system) with conventional multiple daily
dosing or trough levels exceed 2 µg/ml (see section 4.2) when
administrating gentamicin twice daily and 1mg/ml for a once daily
dosing.

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Gentamicin Sulphate 10mg/ml & 40mg/ml
Wockhardt UK

UK
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Gentamicin_Leaflet_107393-3.ai
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11th January, 2016
R 1st PDF sent on - 12TH JAN. 2016
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CHANGE CONTROL : Version changes due to change in:
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Regulatory
Changes in detail: • Regulatory text amends

Non-Regulatory

• This is split into doses given every 6-8 hours
• This dose may be increased or decreased by your doctor depending
on your illness
• If you have kidney problems your doctor may give you a lower dose
• Elderly people should be closely checked when having this medicine.
Use in children and adolescents
Children (aged 1 year and above)
• The usual daily dose is 3-6mg for each kg of body weight
• This is given either as 1 single dose or sometimes split into 2 separate
doses.
Babies (aged 4 weeks to 1 year)
• The usual daily dose is 4.5 to 7.5mg for each kg of body weight
• This is given either as 1 single dose or sometimes split into 2 separate
doses.
New born babies (up to 4 weeks):
• The usual daily dose is 4 to 7mg for each kg of body weight
• This is given in 1 single dose.
If you take more gentamicin than you should
It is most unlikely that you will be given too much medicine by the
doctor or nurse.
Your doctor or nurse will be checking your progress and checking the
medicine that you are given. Ask if you are not sure why you are
getting a dose of medicine.
If you forget to take gentamicin
Gentamicin will be given to you by a doctor or nurse. It is most unlikely
that you will not be given the medicine as prescribed. If you think that
you may have missed a dose then talk to your nurse or doctor.
If you stop taking gentamicin
It is important that the course of treatment your doctor has prescribed
is finished.
You may start to feel better but it is important to continue your
treatment until the doctor advises otherwise. If you stop, your
infection may get worse again.

4. POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS
Like all medicines, gentamicin can cause side effects, although not
everybody gets them.
Tell your doctor or nurse as soon as possible if any of the
following side effects happen:
• It becomes difficult keeping your balance, you feel dizzy or your
hearing becomes poor. This may happen as Gentamicin can
sometimes damage the ear. This is more likely to happen if your
kidneys do not work very well
• If you notice anything unusual when you pass water, such as any sign
of blood in your water (urine) or you find you are passing less water
than is normal for you.
This may mean you have kidney problems.
• If you have unusual difficulty in moving which has not happened
before, feel weak or unusually tired or have any breathing difficulties
that have not happened before.
This may mean you have nerve or muscle problems.
• You get swelling of the hands, feet, ankles, face, lips or throat which
may cause difficulty in swallowing or breathing. You could also
notice an itchy, lumpy rash (hives) or nettle rash (urticaria). This may
mean you are having an allergic reaction to gentamicin.
If you notice any of the above, talk to your doctor or nurse as soon as
possible.
Other possible side effects of gentamicin are:
Uncommon (may affect up to 1 in 100 people): abnormal blood
composition
Rare (may affect up to 1 in 1,000 people): low blood levels of
potassium, calcium and magnesium, loss of appetite, weight loss,
damage of peripheral nerves, impairment or loss of feeling, vomiting,
sickness, increased salivation, inflammation in the mouth, increased
levels of liver enzymes and blood bilirubin, muscle pain, increased
levels of blood urea, increased body temperature
Very rare (may affect up to 1 in 10,000 people): infection with other,
gentamicin-resistant germs, drug fever, confusion, hallucinations,
mental depression, organic brain disease, convulsions, dizziness,
balance disorder, headache, impairment of vision, vertigo, decreased
blood pressure, increased blood pressure, hair loss, pain at injection
site, severe allergic reaction of the skin and mucous membranes
accompanied by blistering and reddening of the skin (Erythema
multiforme), which might in very severe cases affect inner organs and
– In patients with pre-existing inner ear damage (hearing impairment
or balance function impairment), or where treatment is long-term,
additional monitoring of the balance function and hearing is
required.
– Prolonged treatment should be avoided. If possible, the duration of
therapy should be limited to 7 – 10 days (see section 4.2).
– Avoid therapy with aminoglycosides immediately subsequent to
previous aminoglycoside treatment; if possible, there should be an
interval of 7 – 14 days between treatments.
– If possible, avoid concurrent administration of other potentially
ototoxic and nephrotoxic substances. If this is unavoidable,
particular careful monitoring of renal function is indicated (see
section 4.5).
– Ensure adequate hydration and urine production.

might be life threatening (Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal
necrolysis).
Reporting of side effects
If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor, pharmacist or nurse. This
includes any possible side effects not listed in this leaflet. You can also
report side effects directly via the national reporting systems below:
United Kingdom:
Yellow Card Scheme
Website: www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard
Ireland:
HPRA Pharmacovigilance, Earlsfort Terrace, IRL - Dublin 2;
Tel: +353 1 6764971; Fax: +353 1 6762517;
Website: www.hpra.ie; e-mail: medsafety@hpra.ie
By reporting side effects you can help provide more information on the
safety of this medicine

5. HOW TO STORE GENTAMICIN
• You will not be asked to store your medicine. It will be brought to
you ready to be given straight away
• Keep this medicine out of sight and reach of children
• Do not use this medicine after the expiry date which is stated on the
carton and on the ampoule after “Exp.”. The expiry date refers to the
last day of that month
• Use immediately after opening
• Do not store this medicine above 25°C. Do not keep this medicine in a
fridge or freezer. Store in the original package in order to protect
from light
• After dilution with 0.9% sodium chloride or 5% glucose solution,
gentamicin is stable for 24 h at 25°C.
Chemical and physical in-use stability has been demonstrated for 24
hours at 25°C.
From a microbiological point of view, unless the method of opening/
dilution precludes the risk of microbial contamination, the product
should be used immediately. If not used immediately, in-use storage
times and conditions prior to use are the responsibility of the user.
• Do not throw away any medicines via household waste. Ask your
pharmacist how to throw away medicines you no longer use. These
measures will help protect the environment.

6. CONTENTS OF THE PACK AND OTHER INFORMATION
What gentamicin contains
- The active substance is gentamicin as gentamicin sulfate
- The other ingredients are sulfuric acid or sodium hydroxide (for pH
adjustment), sodium metabisulfite (E223) and water for injections.
Each 2 ml ampoule of Gentamicin 10mg/ml Solution for Injection or
Infusion contains the equivalent of 20mg of gentamicin.
Each 2 ml ampoule of Gentamicin 40mg/ml Solution for Injection or
Infusion contains the equivalent of 80mg of gentamicin.
What gentamicin looks like and content of the pack
The medicine is a clear, colourless solution for injection or infusion in
2ml ampoules.
Gentamicin 10 mg/ml is available in packs containing 5 ampoules.
Gentamicin 40 mg/ml is available in packs containing 5 or 10 ampoules.
Not all pack sizes may be marketed.
Marketing Authorisation Holder and Manufacturer
Marketing Authorisation Holder:
Wockhardt UK Ltd, Ash Road North, Wrexham LL13 9UF, UK.
Manufacturer: CP Pharmaceuticals Ltd, Ash Road North, Wrexham,
LL13 9UF, UK
Other formats:
To listen to or request a copy of this leaflet in Braille, large print or
audio please call, free of charge:
0800 198 5000 (UK Only).
Please be ready to give the following information:
Product name
Reference number
Gentamicin 10mg/ml
Solution for Injection or Infusion
PL 29831/0659
Gentamicin 40mg/ml
Solution for Injection or Infusion
PL 29831/0660
This is a service provided by the Royal National Institute of Blind People
For the Republic of Ireland please call +44 1978 669 272.
This leaflet was last revised in 05/2016

Instructions for administration and dilution
After first opening: from the microbiological point of view, the product
should be used immediately.
Gentamicin can be diluted with 0.9% sodium chloride or 5% glucose
solution. After dilution gentamicin is stable for 24 h at 25°C.
Chemical and physical in-use stability has been demonstrated for 24
hours at 25°C.
From a microbiological point of view, unless the method of
opening/dilution precludes the risk of microbial contamination, the
product should be used immediately. If not used immediately, in-use
storage times and conditions prior to use are the responsibility of the
user.
107393/3

pg2/2

PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET: INFORMATION FOR THE USER
GENTAMICIN 10MG/ML SOLUTION FOR INJECTION OR INFUSION
and
GENTAMICIN 40MG/ML SOLUTION FOR INJECTION OR INFUSION

Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start taking this medicine because it contains
important information for you
• Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again
• If you have further questions, please ask your doctor or pharmacist
• This medicine has been prescribed for you. Do not pass it on to others. It may harm them,
even if their signs of illness are the same as yours
• If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor or pharmacist. This includes any possible side
effects not listed in this leaflet. See section 4.
What is in this leaflet:
1. What gentamicin is and what it is used for
2. What you need to know before you take gentamicin
3. How to take gentamicin
4. Possible side effects
5. How to store gentamicin
6. Contents of the pack and other information
1. WHAT GENTAMICIN IS AND WHAT IT IS USED FOR
The name of this medicine is Gentamicin 10mg/ml Solution for Injection or Infusion and
Gentamicin 40mg/ml Solution for Injection or Infusion (called “gentamicin” in this leaflet).
It contains a medicine called gentamicin sulfate. This belongs to a group of antibiotics called
aminoglycosides.
Gentamicin is used to treat infections caused by bacteria in adults and children including
new-borns. This includes infections in:
• Your urinary tract (including your kidneys or bladder)
• Your chest (including your lungs)

• Your blood – this is sometimes called ‘bacteraemia’
• Other serious infections
2. WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW BEFORE YOU TAKEGENTAMICIN
Do not take Gentamicin if:
• You have Myasthenia Gravis. This is a disease that causes muscle weakness
• You are allergic (hypersensitive) to gentamicin or to any of the other ingredients of this
medicine (listed in section 6). Signs of an allergic reaction include: a rash, swallowing or
breathing problems, swelling of your lips, face, throat and tongue.
Do not take this medicine if any of the above applies to you. If you are not sure, talk to your
doctor or pharmacist before taking gentamicin.
Warning and precautions
Talk to your doctor or pharmacist before taking Gentamicin if:
• You are pregnant, might become pregnant, or think you may be pregnant
• You are breast-feeding (see ‘Pregnancy and breast-feeding’ section below)
• You have any muscle weakness problems
• You are extremely overweight
• You have kidney problems, are over 65 years of age
 You have pre-existing ear damage
 You experience severe diarrhoea
Your infection might not respond to gentamicin if it did not respond to other aminoglycosides
and you may show an allergic reaction to gentamicin if you are already allergic to another
aminoglycoside.
There is only limited experience on once daily dosing of gentamicin in elderly patients.
If you are not sure if any of the above applies to you, talk to your doctor or pharmacist before
taking gentamicin.
Children
If you are less than 1 year old your doctor will need to keep a careful watch on you during
your treatment to prevent damage to your ears. He may check your hearing, your balance,
how your kidneys are working and the amount of gentamicin in your blood.
Other medicines and Gentamicin

Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking, have recently taken or might take any other
medicines. This is because gentamicin can affect the way some other medicines work. Also,
some medicines can affect the way gentamicin works.
In particular tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following:
• Medicines used to thin the blood such as warfarin: concomitant use of Gentamicin may
increase their effects on the blood
• Medicines that may determine additional toxicity to kidneys and ear damage:
Water tablets or injections (diuretics) such as furosemide or etacrynic acid
Amphotericin B (used to treat fungal infections
Cephalosporin antibiotics such as cephaloridine or other antibiotics
Ciclosporin (used in organ transplants or for severe skin problems)
Cisplatin (used to treat some cancers)
• Neostigmine or pyridostigmine (used to treat Myasthenia Gravis): their use may contrast the
effect of gentamicin
• Muscle relaxants and ether - sometimes used during operations which need an anaesthetic:
Gentamicin can enhance their effects on nerve and muscle function.
 Methoxyflurane: Gentamicin may increase its kidney damaging effect.
 Carbenicillin: its use may decrease the quantity of gentamicin in the blood in patients with
pre-existing problems to kidneys
• Indometacin (used to treat pain or swelling): its use may increase the quantity of gentamicin
in the blood in neonates
• Bisphosphonates (used to treat osteoporosis): their use may increase the risk of excessive
quantity of calcium in the blood.
• Botulinum toxin – used to lower the activity of overactive muscles. This is also sometimes
used in cosmetic procedures (botox)
These medicines may increase the chances of getting certain side effects (see Section 4:
Possible side effects). If you are unsure about any of the above, consult your doctor.
Pregnancy and breast-feeding
Talk to your doctor before having this medicine if:
• You are pregnant, think you may be pregnant or plan to get pregnant. Gentamicin should
not normally be used during pregnancy

• You are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed
Driving and using machines
Caution is advised when driving and using machines in view of the possible undesired effects
such as dizziness and vertigo.
Gentamicin 10 mg/ml contains sodium metabisulfite, which may rarely cause severe
allergic reactions and difficulty in breathing.
This medicine contains 0,78 mg of sodium per ampoule (less than 23 mg per ampoule), i.e. it
is essentially sodium free.
Monitoring
To avoid adverse events, your doctor may consider monitoring hearing, balance, and renal
function before, during and after treatment and serum gentamicin concentrations during
therapy.
3. HOW TO TAKE GENTAMICIN
Gentamicin is always given to you by a doctor or nurse. It is usually injected into a muscle
but may also be injected into a vein in some patients
If it is given into a vein, it can either be given as an injection or dissolved with, e.g. saline or
5% glucose in water and given as a slow injection via a drip (infusion).
Your doctor will decide how much to give you, depending on your weight. The correct dose
also depends on the type of infection and any other illness you may have.
Blood samples will be taken by your doctor or nurse to check the dose is right for you.
Always take this medicine exactly as your doctor or pharmacist has told you. Check with
your doctor or pharmacist if you are not sure.
The recommended dose is stated below and apply to both of the medicines shown at the
heading of this leaflet.
Adults
• The usual daily dose in adults is 3-5mg for each kg of body weight
• This is split into doses given every 6-8 hours
• This dose may be increased or decreased by your doctor depending on your illness
• If you have kidney problems your doctor may give you a lower dose
• Elderly people should be closely checked when having this medicine
Use in children and adolescents

Children (aged 1 year and above)
• The usual daily dose is 3-6mg for each kg of body weight
• This is given either as 1 single dose or sometimes split into 2 separate doses
Babies (aged 4 weeks to 1 year)
• The usual daily dose is 4.5 to 7.5mg for each kg of body weight
• This is given either as 1 single dose or sometimes split into 2 separate doses
New born babies (up to 4 weeks):
• The usual daily dose is 4 to 7mg for each kg of body weight
• This is given in 1 single dose
If you take more gentamicin than you should
It is most unlikely that you will be given too much medicine by the doctor or nurse.
Your doctor or nurse will be checking your progress and checking the medicine that you are
given. Ask if you are not sure why you are getting a dose of medicine.
If you forget to take gentamicin
Gentamicin will be given to you by a doctor or nurse. It is most unlikely that you will not be
given the medicine as prescribed. If you think that you may have missed a dose then talk to
your nurse or doctor.
If you stop taking gentamicin
It is important that the course of treatment your doctor has prescribed is finished.
You may start to feel better but it is important to continue your treatment until the doctor
advises otherwise. If you stop, your infection may get worse again.
4. POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS
Like all medicines, gentamicin can cause side effects, although not everybody gets them.
Tell your doctor or nurse as soon as possible if any of the following side effects happen:
• It becomes difficult keeping your balance, you feel dizzy or your hearing becomes poor.
This may happen as Gentamicin can sometimes damage the ear. This is more likely to happen
if your kidneys do not work very well.
• If you notice anything unusual when you pass water, such as any sign of blood in your
water (urine) or you find you are passing less water than is normal for you.
This may mean you have kidney problems.

• If you have unusual difficulty in moving which has not happened before, feel weak or
unusually tired or have any breathing difficulties that have not happened before.
This may mean you have nerve or muscle problems
• You get swelling of the hands, feet, ankles, face, lips or throat which may cause difficulty in
swallowing or breathing. You could also notice an itchy, lumpy rash (hives) or nettle rash
(urticaria). This may mean you are having an allergic reaction to gentamicin
If you notice any of the above, talk to your doctor or nurse as soon as possible.
Other possible side effects of gentamicin are:
Uncommon (may affect more than 1 in 100 people): abnormal blood composition
Rare (may affect 1 in 1000 people): low blood levels of potassium, calcium and magnesium,
loss of appetite, weight loss, damage of peripheral nerves, impairment or loss of feeling,
vomiting, sickness, increased salivation, inflammation in the mouth, increased levels of liver
enzymes and blood bilirubin, muscle pain, increased levels of blood urea, increased body
temperature
Very rare (may affect up to 1 in 10,000 people): infection with other, gentamicin-resistant
germs, drug fever, confusion, hallucinations, mental depression, organic brain disease,
convulsions, dizziness, balance disorder, headache, impairment of vision, vertigo, decreased
blood pressure, increased blood pressure, hair loss, pain at injection site, severe allergic
reaction of the skin and mucous membranes accompanied by blistering and reddening of the
skin (Erythema multiforme), which might in very severe cases affect inner organs and might
be life threatening (Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis).
Reporting of side effects
If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor, pharmacist or nurse. This includes any
possible side effects not listed in this leaflet. You can also report side effects directly via the
national reporting systems below:
United Kingdom:
Yellow Card Scheme
Website: www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard
Ireland
HPRA Pharmacovigilance, Earlsfort Terrace, IRL – Dublin 2; Tel:+353 1 6764971; Fax:
+353 1 6762517; Website: www.hpra.ie, email: medsafety@hpra.ie.
By reporting side effects you can help provide more information on the safety of this
medicine.

5. HOW TO STORE GENTAMICIN
• You will not be asked to store your medicine. It will be brought to you ready to be given
straight away
• Keep this medicine out of sight and reach of children
• Do not use this medicine after the expiry date which is stated on the carton and on the
ampoule after “Exp.”. The expiry date refers to the last day of that month.
• Use immediately after opening.
• Do not store this medicine above 25°C. Do not keep this medicine in a fridge or freezer.
Store in the original package in order to protect from light.
• After dilution with 0.9% sodium chloride or 5% glucose solution, gentamicin is stable for
24 h at 25°C.
Chemical and physical in-use stability has been demonstrated for 24 hours at 25°C.
From a microbiological point of view, unless the method of opening/dilution precludes the
risk of microbial contamination, the product should be used immediately. If not used
immediately, in-use storage times and conditions prior to use are the responsibility of the
user.
• Do not throw away any medicines via household waste. Ask your pharmacist how to throw
away medicines you no longer use. These measures will help protect the environment.

6. CONTENTS OF THE PACK AND OTHER INFORMATION
What gentamicin contains
-

The active substance is gentamicin as gentamicin sulfate
The other ingredients are sulfuric acid or sodium hydroxide (for pH adjustment),
sodium metabisulfite (E223) and water for injections.

Each 2 ml ampoule of Gentamicin 10mg/ml Solution for Injection or Infusion contains the
equivalent of 20mg of gentamicin.
Each 2 ml ampoule of Gentamicin 40mg/ml Solution for Injection or Infusion contains the
equivalent of 80mg of gentamicin.
What gentamicin looks like and content of the pack
The medicine is a clear, colourless solution for injection or infusion in 2ml ampoules.
Gentamicin 10 mg/ml is available in packs containing 5 ampoules.
Gentamicin 40 mg/ml is available in packs containing 5 or 10 ampoules.

Not all pack sizes may be marketed.
Marketing Authorisation Holder and Manufacturer
The Marketing Authorisation Holder is: Wockhardt UK Ltd, Ash Road North, Wrexham
LL13 9UF, UK.
The Manufacturer is: CP Pharmaceuticals Ltd, Ash Road North, Wrexham, LL13 9UF, UK
This leaflet was last revised in 05/2015

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - The following information is intended for medical or healthcare professionals only:
Monitoring
To avoid adverse events, continuous monitoring (before, during and after treatment) of renal
function (serum creatinin, creatinin clearance), control of function of vestibule and
cochlea as well as hepatic and laboratory parameters is recommended.
In order to reduce the risk of nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity, the following instructions should
be considered:
– Regular assessment of auditory, vestibular and renal function is particularly necessary in
patients with additional risk factors. Impaired hepatic function or auditory function,
bacteraemia and fever have been reported to increase the risk of ototoxicity. Volume
depletion or hypotension and liver disease have been reported as additional risk factors
for nephrotoxicity.
– Monitoring of renal function before, during and after treatment.
– Dosage strictly according to creatinine clearance (or serum creatinine concentration). In
patients with impaired renal function, the dosage must be adjusted according to renal
performance (see section 4.2).
– In patients with impaired renal function additionally receiving gentamicin locally
(inhalation, intratracheal, instillation), the amount of gentamicin absorbed after local
administration must also be taken into account for dose adjustment of systemic
treatment.
– Monitoring of serum gentamicin concentrations during therapy in order to avoid that peak
levels exceed 10 µg/ml (toxic threshold for the cochleo-vestibular system) with
conventional multiple daily dosing or trough levels exceed 2 µg/ml (see section 4.2)
when administrating gentamicin twice daily and 1 mg/l for a once daily dosing.
– In patients with pre-existing inner ear damage (hearing impairment or balance function
impairment), or where treatment is long-term, additional monitoring of the balance
function and hearing is required.
– Prolonged treatment should be avoided. If possible, the duration of therapy should be
limited to 7 – 10 days (see section 4.2).
– Avoid therapy with aminoglycosides immediately subsequent to previous aminoglycoside
treatment; if possible, there should be an interval of 7 – 14 days between treatments.
– If possible, avoid concurrent administration of other potentially ototoxic and nephrotoxic
substances. If this is unavoidable, particular careful monitoring of renal function is
indicated (see section 4.5).
– Ensure adequate hydration and urine production.

Instructions for administration and dilution
After first opening: from the microbiological point of view, the product should be used
immediately.
Gentamicin can be diluted with 0.9% sodium chloride or 5% glucose solution. After dilution
gentamicin is stable for 24 h at 25°C.
Chemical and physical in-use stability has been demonstrated for 24 hours at 25°C.
From a microbiological point of view, unless the method of opening/dilution precludes the
risk of microbial contamination, the product should be used immediately. If not used
immediately, in-use storage times and conditions prior to use are the responsibility of the
user.

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Source: Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided here is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. This information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. If you have questions about the substances you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

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