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ELETRIPTAN 40 MG FILM COATED TABLETS

Active substance(s): ELETRIPTAN / ELETRIPTAN

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Package leaflet: Information for the user

Relpax®
40mg film coated tablets
(eletriptan hydrobromide)

Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start
taking this medicine because it contains important
information for you.
• Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again.
• If you have any further questions, ask your doctor
or pharmacist.
• This medicine has been prescribed for you only.
Do not pass it on to others. It may harm them,
even if their signs of illness are the same as yours.
• If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor or
pharmacist. This includes any possible side effects
not listed in this leaflet. See section 4.

The name of your medicine is Relpax® 40mg tablets but will be
referred to as Relpax throughout this leaflet.

What is in this leaflet
1. What Relpax is and what it is used for
2. What you need to know before you take Relpax
3. How to take Relpax
4. Possible side effects
5. How to store Relpax
6. Contents of the pack and other information

1. What Relpax is and what it is used for
Relpax contains the active substance eletriptan. Relpax is one of
a group of medicines called serotonin receptor agonists.
Serotonin is a natural substance found in the brain that helps to
narrow the blood vessels.
Relpax can be used to treat migraine headache with or without
aura in adults. Before the start of a migraine headache, you may
experience a phase called an aura, which can involve vision
disorders, numbness and speech disorders.

2. What you need to know before you take Relpax
Do not take Relpax:
• If you are allergic (hypersensitive) to eletriptan, or any of the
other ingredients of this medicine (listed in section 6).
• If you have severe liver or kidney disease.
• If you have moderate to severe high blood pressure or
untreated mild high blood pressure.
• If you have ever had heart problems, [e.g. heart attack, angina,
heart failure or significant abnormal heart rhythm (arrhythmia),
temporary, sudden narrowing of one of the coronary arteries].
• If you have poor circulation (peripheral vascular disease).

• If you have ever had a stroke (even a mild one that lasted for
only a few minutes or hours).
• If you have taken ergotamine or medicines like ergotamine
(including methysergide) within 24 hours before or after taking
Relpax.
• If you are taking any other medicines that end in ‘triptan’ (for
example sumatriptan, rizatriptan, naratriptan, zolmitriptan,
almotriptan and frovatriptan).
Please consult your doctor and do not take Relpax, if these
statements apply to you now or have applied to you at any time in
the past.
Warnings and precautions
Talk to your doctor or pharmacist before taking Relpax if:
• you have diabetes.
• you smoke or use nicotine replacement therapy.
• you are male and over 40 years.
• you are female and post-menopausal.
• you or anybody in your family have coronary artery disease.
• you have ever been told that you may have an increased risk of
heart disease, discuss this with your doctor before using
Relpax.

Other medicines and Relpax
Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking, have recently
taken or might take any other medicines.

Repeat use of migraine medicines
If you repeatedly use Relpax or any medicines for the treatment
of migraine over several days or weeks, this can cause daily longterm headaches.
Tell your doctor if you experience this as you might need to stop
treatment for a while.

The herbal preparation St John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum)
should not be taken at the same time as this medicine. If you
already take St John’s wort, consult your doctor before stopping
the St John’s wort preparation.

Taking Relpax together with some medicines may cause
serious side effects. Do not use Relpax if:
• you have taken ergotamine or medicines like ergotamine
(including methysergide) within 24 hours before or after taking
Relpax.
• you are taking any other medicines that end in ‘triptan’ (for
example sumatriptan, rizatriptan, naratriptan, zolmitriptan,
almotriptan and frovatriptan).
Some medicines can affect the way Relpax works, or Relpax itself
can reduce the effectiveness of other medicines taken at the
same time.
These include:
• Drugs used to treat fungal infections (e.g. ketoconazole and
itraconazole).
• Drugs used to treat bacterial infections (e.g. erythromycin,
clarithromycin and josamycin).
• Drugs used to treat AIDS and HIV (e.g. ritonavir, indinavir and
nelfinavir).

Tell your doctor before starting treatment with Relpax, if you are
taking some medicines (commonly referred to as * SSRIs or
** SNRIs) for depression and other mental disorders.

These medicines may increase the risk of developing serotonin
syndrome during combined use with certain migraine
medications. See Section 4 ‘Possible Side Effects’ for more
information on the symptoms of serotonin syndrome. *SSRIs –
Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors **SNRIs – Serotonin
norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors
Relpax with food and drink
Relpax can be used before or after food and drinks.
Pregnancy and breast-feeding
Ask your doctor or pharmacist for advice before taking any
medicine. If you are pregnant or breast-feeding, think you might
be pregnant or are planning to have a baby, ask your doctor for
advice before taking this medicine. It is recommended to avoid
breast-feeding for 24 hours after taking this medicine.
Driving and using machines
Relpax or the migraine itself may make you sleepy. This medicine
may also make you feel dizzy. Therefore avoid driving and using
machines during the migraine attack or after taking your
medicine.
Relpax contains Lactose and the dye Sunset Yellow Aluminium
Lake (E 110) Lactose is a type of sugar. If you have been told by
your doctor that you have an intolerance to some sugars, contact
your doctor before taking this medicine.
The dye Sunset Yellow Aluminium Lake (E 110) may cause
allergic reactions.

3. How to take Relpax
Always take this medicine exactly as your doctor has told you.
Check with your doctor or pharmacist if you are not sure.
Adults
Your medicine can be taken at any time after the start of the
migraine headache, but it is best to take it as soon as possible.
However you should only take Relpax during the headache
phase of the migraine. You should not take this medicine to
prevent a migraine attack.
• The usual starting dose is one 40mg tablet.
• Swallow each tablet whole with a drink of water.
• If the first tablet does not relieve your migraine, do not take a
second tablet for the same attack.
• If after a first tablet your migraine is relieved and then comes
back, you may take a second tablet. However, after taking the
first tablet you must wait at least 2 hours before taking the
second tablet.
• You should not take more than 80mg (2 x 40mg tablets) within
24 hours.
• If you find that a dose of one 40mg tablet does not relieve your
migraines, tell your doctor – he or she may decide to increase
the dose to two 40mg tablets for future attacks.
Use in children and adolescents under 18 years
Relpax tablets are not recommended for children and adolescents
under 18 years of age.

Elderly
Relpax tablets are not recommended for patients over 65 years of
age.
Kidney Impairment
This medicine can be used in patients with mild or moderate
kidney problems. In these patients a starting dose of 20mg is
recommended, and the total daily dose should not be more than
40mg. Your doctor will tell you what dose to take.
Liver Impairment
This medicine can be used in patients with mild or moderate liver
problems. No dose adjustment is required for mild or moderate
liver impairment.
If you take more Relpax than you should
If you accidentally take too much Relpax, contact your doctor at
once or go to the nearest hospital casualty department. Always
take the labelled medicine package with you, whether there is any
medicine left or not. Side effects from taking too much Relpax
include high blood pressure and heart problems.
If you forget to take Relpax
If you forget to take a dose, take it as soon as you remember
unless it is time for your next dose. Do not take a double dose to
make up for a forgotten dose.
If you have any further questions on the use of this medicine, ask
your doctor or pharmacist.

4. Possible side effects
Like all medicines, this medicine can cause side effects, although
not everybody gets them.
Tell your doctor immediately if you experience any of the
following symptoms after taking this medicine.
• Sudden wheeziness, difficulty in breathing, swelling of eyelids,
face or lips, rash or itching (especially affecting the whole body)
as this may be a sign of a hypersensitivity reaction. Chest pain
and tightness, which may be intense and involve the throat.
These may be symptoms of problems of the blood circulation of
the heart (Ischaemic heart disease).
• Signs and symptoms of serotonin syndrome which may include
restlessness, hallucinations, loss of co-ordination, fast heart
beat, increase body temperature, fast changes in blood
pressure and overactive reflexes.
Other side-effects that may occur are: Common
(may affect up to 1 in 10 people)
• Chest pain or tightness or pressure, Heart palpitations,
Increased heart rate
• Dizziness, Sensation of spinning or whirling (Vertigo),
Headache, Feeling sleepy, Reduced sense of touch or pain
• Sore throat, Throat tightness, Dry mouth
• Abdominal and stomach pain, Indigestion (upset stomach),
Nausea (sensation of unease and discomfort in stomach or
abdomen with an urge to vomit)

• Stiffness (Increased muscle tone), Muscle weakness, Back
pain, Muscle pain
• Generally feeling weak, Feeling hot, Chills, Runny nose,
Sweating, Tingling or abnormal sensation, Flushing, Pain
Uncommon
(may affect up to 1 in 100 people)
• Difficulty breathing, Yawning
• Swelling of the face or hands and feet, Inflammation or infection
of the tongue, Skin rash, Itching
• Increased sense of touch or pain (Hyperaesthesia), Loss of coordination, Slow or reduced movement, Tremor, Slurred speech
• Not feeling oneself (Depersonalisation), Depression, Thinking
strangely, Feeling agitated, Feeling confused, Mood swings
(Euphoria), Periods of unresponsiveness (Stupor), General
feeling of discomfort, Illness or lack of wellbeing (Malaise),
Sleeplessness (Insomnia)
• Loss of appetite and weight loss (Anorexia), Taste disturbance,
Thirst
• Degeneration of the joints (Arthrosis), Bone pain, Joint pain
• Increased need to pass water (urinate), Problems with
urinating, Passing excessive quantity of urine, Diarrhoea
• Abnormal vision, Eye pain, Intolerance to light, Dry or watery
eyes
• Ear pain, Ringing in the ears (Tinnitus)
• Poor circulation (Peripheral vascular disorder)
Rare
(may affect up to 1 in 1,000 people)
• Shock, Asthma, Hives (Urticaria), Skin disorder, Swollen tongue
• Throat or chest infection, Swollen lymph glands









Slow heart rate
Emotionally fragile (mood swings)
Degeneration of joints (Arthritis), Muscle disorder, Twitching
Constipation, Inflamed gullet, Belching
Breast Pain, Heavy or prolonged menstrual periods
Eye infection (Conjunctivitis)
Changes to voice

Other side effects reported include, fainting, high blood pressure,
inflammation of the large intestine, vomiting, brain and blood
vessel-related accident, inadequate heart blood flow, heart attack,
heart muscle/artery-related spasm.
Your doctor may also take regular blood samples to test for raised
liver enzymes or any blood problems.
Reporting of side effects
If you get any side effects talk to your doctor, pharmacist or
nurse. This includes any possible side effects not listed in this
leaflet. You can also report side effects directly via the Yellow
Card Scheme at: www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard.
By reporting side effects you can help provide more information
on the safety of this medicine.

5. How to store Relpax
• Keep out of the sight and reach of children. This medicinal
product does not require any special storage conditions.
• Do not take the tablets after the expiry date which is stated on
the carton and blister label after ‘Exp’. The expiry date refers to
the last day of that month.

• If the tablets become discoloured or show any signs of
deterioration, seek the advice of your pharmacist.
• Medicines should not be disposed of via wastewater or
household waste. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of
medicines no longer required. These measures will help to
protect the environment.

6. Contents of the pack and other information
What Relpax contains
Each film-coated tablet contains 40mg eletriptan (as eletriptan
hydrobromide).
The other ingredients are microcrystalline cellulose, lactose
monohydrate, croscarmellose sodium, magnesium stearate,
titanium dioxide (E171), hypromellose, glycerol triacetate and
sunset yellow FCF aluminium lake (E110).
What Relpax looks like and contents of the pack
Relpax is an orange, round tablet marked with ‘PFIZER’ on one
side and ‘REP 40’ on the other side.
It is available in PVC/Aclar/Aluminium blister pack of 6 tablets.
Manufacturer:
R-Pharm Germany GmbH,
Heinrich-Mack-Str.35,
89257 Illertissen,
Germany.

Procured from within the EU &
repackaged by PL holder:
Kosei Pharma UK Limited.,
956 Buckingham Avenue,
Slough Trading Estate, Slough,
SL1 4NL, UK

Relpax 40mg film coated tablets;
PL 39352/0384
Leaflet date: 11/07/2017
Relpax is the registered trade mark of Pfizer Products Inc.

To listen to or request a copy
of this leaflet in Braille, large
print or audio please call,
01753515054 (UK only)

Package leaflet: Information for the user

Eletriptan
40mg film coated tablets
(eletriptan hydrobromide)

Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start
taking this medicine because it contains important
information for you.
• Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again.
• If you have any further questions, ask your doctor
or pharmacist.
• This medicine has been prescribed for you only.
Do not pass it on to others. It may harm them,
even if their signs of illness are the same as yours.
• If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor or
pharmacist. This includes any possible side effects
not listed in this leaflet. See section 4.

The name of your medicine is Eletriptan 40mg tablets but will be
referred to as Eletriptan throughout this leaflet.

What is in this leaflet
1. What Eletriptan is and what it is used for
2. What you need to know before you take Eletriptan
3. How to take Eletriptan
4. Possible side effects
5. How to store Eletriptan
6. Contents of the pack and other information

1.

What Eletriptan is and what it is used for

Eletriptan contains the active substance eletriptan. Eletriptan is
one of a group of medicines called serotonin receptor agonists.
Serotonin is a natural substance found in the brain that helps to
narrow the blood vessels.
Eletriptan can be used to treat migraine headache with or without
aura in adults. Before the start of a migraine headache, you may
experience a phase called an aura, which can involve vision
disorders, numbness and speech disorders.

2.

What you need to know before you take Eletriptan

Do not take Eletriptan:
• If you are allergic (hypersensitive) to Eletriptan, or any of the
other ingredients of this medicine (listed in section 6).
• If you have severe liver or kidney disease.
• If you have moderate to severe high blood pressure or
untreated mild high blood pressure.
• If you have ever had heart problems, [e.g. heart attack, angina,
heart failure or significant abnormal heart rhythm (arrhythmia),
temporary, sudden narrowing of one of the coronary arteries].
• If you have poor circulation (peripheral vascular disease).

• If you have ever had a stroke (even a mild one that lasted for
only a few minutes or hours).
• If you have taken ergotamine or medicines like ergotamine
(including methysergide) within 24 hours before or after taking
Eletriptan.
• If you are taking any other medicines that end in ‘triptan’ (for
example sumatriptan, rizatriptan, naratriptan, zolmitriptan,
almotriptan and frovatriptan).
Please consult your doctor and do not take Eletriptan, if these
statements apply to you now or have applied to you at any time in
the past.
Warnings and precautions
Talk to your doctor or pharmacist before taking Eletriptan if:
• you have diabetes.
• you smoke or use nicotine replacement therapy.
• you are male and over 40 years.
• you are female and post-menopausal.
• you or anybody in your family have coronary artery disease.
• you have ever been told that you may have an increased risk of
heart disease, discuss this with your doctor before using
Eletriptan.

Other medicines and Eletriptan
Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking, have recently
taken or might take any other medicines.

Repeat use of migraine medicines
If you repeatedly use Eletriptan or any medicines for the
treatment of migraine over several days or weeks, this can cause
daily long-term headaches.
Tell your doctor if you experience this as you might need to stop
treatment for a while.

The herbal preparation St John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum)
should not be taken at the same time as this medicine. If you
already take St John’s wort, consult your doctor before stopping
the St John’s wort preparation.

Taking Eletriptan together with some medicines may cause
serious side effects. Do not use Eletriptan if:
• you have taken ergotamine or medicines like ergotamine
(including methysergide) within 24 hours before or after taking
Eletriptan.
• you are taking any other medicines that end in ‘triptan’ (for
example sumatriptan, rizatriptan, naratriptan, zolmitriptan,
almotriptan and frovatriptan).
Some medicines can affect the way Eletriptan works, or Eletriptan
itself can reduce the effectiveness of other medicines taken at the
same time.
These include:
• Drugs used to treat fungal infections (e.g. ketoconazole and
itraconazole).
• Drugs used to treat bacterial infections (e.g. erythromycin,
clarithromycin and josamycin).
• Drugs used to treat AIDS and HIV (e.g. ritonavir, indinavir and
nelfinavir).

Tell your doctor before starting treatment with Eletriptan, if you
are taking some medicines (commonly referred to as SSRIs* or
SNRIs**) for depression and other mental disorders.

These medicines may increase the risk of developing serotonin
syndrome during combined use with certain migraine
medications. See Section 4 ‘Possible Side Effects’ for more
information on the symptoms of serotonin syndrome. * SSRIs –
Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors ** SNRIs – Serotonin
norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors
Eletriptan with food and drink
Eletriptan can be used before or after food and drinks.
Pregnancy and breast-feeding
Ask your doctor or pharmacist for advice before taking any
medicine. If you are pregnant or breast-feeding, think you might
be pregnant or are planning to have a baby, ask your doctor for
advice before taking this medicine. It is recommended to avoid
breast-feeding for 24 hours after taking this medicine.
Driving and using machines
Eletriptan or the migraine itself may make you sleepy. This
medicine may also make you feel dizzy. Therefore avoid driving
and using machines during the migraine attack or after taking
your medicine.
Eletriptan contains Lactose and the dye Sunset Yellow
Aluminium Lake (E 110) Lactose is a type of sugar. If you have
been told by your doctor that you have an intolerance to some
sugars, contact your doctor before taking this medicine.
The dye Sunset Yellow Aluminium Lake (E 110) may cause
allergic reactions.

3. How to take Relpax
Always take this medicine exactly as your doctor has told you.
Check with your doctor or pharmacist if you are not sure.
Adults
Your medicine can be taken at any time after the start of the
migraine headache, but it is best to take it as soon as possible.
However you should only take Eletriptan during the
headache phase of the migraine. You should not take this
medicine to prevent a migraine attack.
• The usual starting dose is one 40mg tablet.
• Swallow each tablet whole with a drink of water.
• If the first tablet does not relieve your migraine, do not take a
second tablet for the same attack.
• If after a first tablet your migraine is relieved and then comes
back, you may take a second tablet. However, after taking the
first tablet you must wait at least 2 hours before taking the
second tablet.
• You should not take more than 80mg (2 x 40mg tablets) within
24 hours.
• If you find that a dose of one 40mg tablet does not relieve your
migraines, tell your doctor – he or she may decide to increase
the dose to two 40mg tablets for future attacks.
Use in children and adolescents under 18 years
Eletriptan tablets are not recommended for children and
adolescents under 18 years of age.

Elderly
Eletriptan tablets are not recommended for patients over 65 years
of age.
Kidney Impairment
This medicine can be used in patients with mild or moderate
kidney problems. In these patients a starting dose of 20mg is
recommended, and the total daily dose should not be more than
40mg. Your doctor will tell you what dose to take.
Liver Impairment
This medicine can be used in patients with mild or moderate liver
problems. No dose adjustment is required for mild or moderate
liver impairment.
If you take more Eletriptan than you should
If you accidentally take too much Eletriptan, contact your doctor at
once or go to the nearest hospital casualty department. Always
take the labelled medicine package with you, whether there is any
medicine left or not. Side effects from taking too much Eletriptan
include high blood pressure and heart problems.
If you forget to take Eletriptan
If you forget to take a dose, take it as soon as you remember
unless it is time for your next dose. Do not take a double dose to
make up for a forgotten dose.
If you have any further questions on the use of this medicine, ask
your doctor or pharmacist.

4. Possible side effects
Like all medicines, this medicine can cause side effects, although
not everybody gets them.
Tell your doctor immediately if you experience any of the
following symptoms after taking this medicine.
• Sudden wheeziness, difficulty in breathing, swelling of eyelids,
face or lips, rash or itching (especially affecting the whole body)
as this may be a sign of a hypersensitivity reaction. Chest pain
and tightness, which may be intense and involve the throat.
These may be symptoms of problems of the blood circulation of
the heart (Ischaemic heart disease).
• Signs and symptoms of serotonin syndrome which may include
restlessness, hallucinations, loss of co-ordination, fast heart
beat, increase body temperature, fast changes in blood
pressure and overactive reflexes.
Other side-effects that may occur are: Common
(may affect up to 1 in 10 people)
• Chest pain or tightness or pressure, Heart palpitations,
Increased heart rate
• Dizziness, Sensation of spinning or whirling (Vertigo),
Headache, Feeling sleepy, Reduced sense of touch or pain
• Sore throat, Throat tightness, Dry mouth
• Abdominal and stomach pain, Indigestion (upset stomach),
Nausea (sensation of unease and discomfort in stomach or
abdomen with an urge to vomit)

• Stiffness (Increased muscle tone), Muscle weakness, Back
pain, Muscle pain
• Generally feeling weak, Feeling hot, Chills, Runny nose,
Sweating, Tingling or abnormal sensation, Flushing, Pain
Uncommon
(may affect up to 1 in 100 people)
• Difficulty breathing, Yawning
• Swelling of the face or hands and feet, Inflammation or infection
of the tongue, Skin rash, Itching
• Increased sense of touch or pain (Hyperaesthesia), Loss of coordination, Slow or reduced movement, Tremor, Slurred speech
• Not feeling oneself (Depersonalisation), Depression, Thinking
strangely, Feeling agitated, Feeling confused, Mood swings
(Euphoria), Periods of unresponsiveness (Stupor), General
feeling of discomfort, Illness or lack of wellbeing (Malaise),
Sleeplessness (Insomnia)
• Loss of appetite and weight loss (Anorexia), Taste disturbance,
Thirst
• Degeneration of the joints (Arthrosis), Bone pain, Joint pain
• Increased need to pass water (urinate), Problems with
urinating, Passing excessive quantity of urine, Diarrhoea
• Abnormal vision, Eye pain, Intolerance to light, Dry or watery
eyes
• Ear pain, Ringing in the ears (Tinnitus)
• Poor circulation (Peripheral vascular disorder)
Rare
(may affect up to 1 in 1,000 people)
• Shock, Asthma, Hives (Urticaria), Skin disorder, Swollen tongue
• Throat or chest infection, Swollen lymph glands









Slow heart rate
Emotionally fragile (mood swings)
Degeneration of joints (Arthritis), Muscle disorder, Twitching
Constipation, Inflamed gullet, Belching
Breast Pain, Heavy or prolonged menstrual periods
Eye infection (Conjunctivitis)
Changes to voice

Other side effects reported include, fainting, high blood pressure,
inflammation of the large intestine, vomiting, brain and blood
vessel-related accident, inadequate heart blood flow, heart attack,
heart muscle/artery-related spasm.
Your doctor may also take regular blood samples to test for raised
liver enzymes or any blood problems.
Reporting of side effects
If you get any side effects talk to your doctor, pharmacist or
nurse. This includes any possible side effects not listed in this
leaflet. You can also report side effects directly via the Yellow
Card Scheme at: www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard.
By reporting side effects you can help provide more information
on the safety of this medicine.

5. How to store Relpax
• Keep out of the sight and reach of children. This medicinal
product does not require any special storage conditions.
• Do not take the tablets after the expiry date which is stated on
the carton and blister label after ‘Exp’. The expiry date refers to
the last day of that month.

• If the tablets become discoloured or show any signs of
deterioration, seek the advice of your pharmacist.
• Medicines should not be disposed of via wastewater or
household waste. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of
medicines no longer required. These measures will help to
protect the environment.

6. Contents of the pack and other information
What Eletriptan contains
Each film-coated tablet contains 40mg eletriptan (as eletriptan
hydrobromide).
The other ingredients are microcrystalline cellulose, lactose
monohydrate, croscarmellose sodium, magnesium stearate,
titanium dioxide (E171), hypromellose, glycerol triacetate and
sunset yellow FCF aluminium lake (E110).
What Eletriptan looks like and contents of the pack
Eletriptan is an orange, round tablet marked with ‘PFIZER’ on one
side and ‘REP 40’ on the other side.
It is available in PVC/Aclar/Aluminium blister pack of 6 tablets.
Manufacturer:
R-Pharm Germany GmbH,
Heinrich-Mack-Str.35,
89257 Illertissen,
Germany.

Procured from within the EU &
repackaged by PL holder:
Kosei Pharma UK Limited.,
956 Buckingham Avenue,
Slough Trading Estate, Slough,
SL1 4NL, UK

Eletriptan 40mg film coated tablets;
PL 39352/0384
Leaflet date: 11/07/2017

To listen to or request a copy
of this leaflet in Braille, large
print or audio please call,
01753515054 (UK only)

Expand Transcript

Source: Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided here is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. This information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. If you have questions about the substances you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

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