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ELDEPRYL 5 MG TABLETS

Active substance(s): SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE

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Eldepryl® 5 mg Tablets

2659
10.04.15[2]

(selegiline hydrochloride)
PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET
Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start taking this medicine.
- Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again.
- If you have any further questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist.
- This medicine has been prescribed for you. Do not pass it on to others. It
may harm them, even if their symptoms are the same as yours.
- If any of the side effects become serious, or if you notice any side effects
not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor or pharmacist.
Your medicine is available using the above name but will be referred to as
Eldepryl throughout the following leaflet.
Also available as Eldepryl 10 mg Tablet and as Eldepryl 10 mg/5 ml Syrup.
In this leaflet:
1. What Eldepryl is and what it is used for
2. Before you take Eldepryl
3. How to take Eldepryl
4. Possible side effects
5. How to store Eldepryl
6. Further information
1. WHAT ELDEPRYL IS AND WHAT IT IS USED FOR
Eldepryl is a monoamine oxidase-B inhibitor, and is used in the treatment of
Parkinson’s disease. Eldepryl may be taken alone in the early stages of
your condition, delaying the need for the addition of other medicines.
Eldepryl however can also be used in conjunction with other treatments
such as Levodopa to reduce the on-off symptoms or uncontrolled
movements you may experience. This happens especially when the effects
of the other treatments are wearing-off.
Your doctor will explain why this medicine has been chosen for you.
2. BEFORE YOU TAKE ELDEPRYL
Do not take Eldepryl
- if you are allergic (hypersensitive) to selegiline hydrochloride or any of the
other ingredients of Eldepryl (see Section 6: Further Information)
- if you are taking any antidepressants (see Taking other medicines).
Antidepressants should be stopped a number of weeks before taking
Eldepryl, speak to your doctor for further advice
- if you are taking pethidine or any other opioid painkillers such as codeine
or tramadol
- if you are taking any monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors e.g. the
antibiotic linezolid
- if you are taking any medicines for migraine e.g. sumatriptan, naratriptan,
zolmitriptan and rizatriptan
- if you are taking any sympathomimetic medicines e.g. medicines used in
the treatment of asthma or to relieve nasal congestion
- if you suffer from stomach or duodenal ulcers
- if you suffer from a movement or muscle disorder not connected to
Parkinson’s disease.
Taking Eldepryl with Levodopa
Do not take Eldepryl together with Levodopa if you suffer from any of the
following conditions:
- major heart or blood vessel problems (cardiovascular disease)
- chest pain (angina)
- high blood pressure (arterial hypertension)
- an erratic or fast heartbeat (e.g. tachycardia or arrhythmias)
- an overactive thyroid gland (hyperthyroid disease)
- an eye condition called narrow angle glaucoma
- a tumour of your adrenal gland (phaeochromocytoma) or prostate
(prostatic adenoma)
- major mental health problems (e.g. schizophrenia or advanced
dementia).
Take special care with Eldepryl
Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if any of the following applies to you:
- if you have uncontrolled high blood pressure, chest pain (angina), the
sensation of feeling your heartbeat (palpitations) or an abnormal or erratic
heartbeat (arrhythmia)
- if you have kidney or liver problems
- if you are being treated for any mental illness, anxiety or sleep problems
- if you have a history of stomach ulcers
- if you are already taking a medicine called Levodopa as it can cause
agitation and uncontrollable movements. Your doctor may need to
monitor you closely and alter your dose
- if you are going to have surgery as Eldepryl may interfere with some of
the medicines used as part of a general anaesthetic
- if you have a history of any unusual urges and/or behaviours (such as
excessive gambling or excessive sexual behaviour). See section 4.

- if you are taking Eldepryl Syrup and you have been told by your doctor
that you have an intolerance to certain kinds of sugar.
Taking other medicines
Please tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking or have recently
taken any other medicines, including medicines obtained without a
prescription. In particular it is important that you tell your doctor if you are
taking any of the following:
- amantadine, dopamine or levodopa (used to treat Parkinson’s disease)
- any type of antidepressant e.g. citalopram, escitalopram, fluoxetine,
fluvoxamine, paroxetine, sertraline, venlafaxine, amitriptyline and
protriptyline cannot be taken with Eldepryl
- pethidine or any other opioid painkillers such as codeine or tramadol
cannot be taken with Eldepryl
- the antibiotic linezolid cannot be taken with Eldepryl
- if you are taking any sympathomimetic medicines e.g. medicines used in
the treatment of asthma or to relieve nasal congestion - these medicines
cannot be taken with Eldepryl
- any medicines for migraine e.g. sumatriptan, naratriptan, zolmitriptan and
rizatriptan cannot be taken with Eldepryl
- medicines for high or low blood pressure
- medicines for mood or mental illness
- medicines to treat anxiety, sleep problems or to relax the gut muscles
(medicines that act on the central nervous system)
- medicines used as part of an anaesthetic
- medicines to treat heart problems (e.g. digitalis) as you may need more
frequent check-ups with your doctor
- medicines to thin the blood (anticoagulants) as you may need more
frequent check-ups with your doctor
- HRT (hormone replacement therapy)
- altretamine (used to treat ovarian cancer)
- oral contraceptives (The ‘pill’, other forms of contraception should be
discussed with your doctor).
Eldepryl needs a period of time to be completely removed from the body
before starting certain other medicines. Please talk to your doctor for advice
if you are thinking about starting other medication.
Taking Eldepryl with food and drink
You may take Eldepryl with food and drink.
Alcohol should be avoided whilst you are taking Eldepryl.
Your doctor may recommend that you avoid certain foods containing
tyramine such as mature cheese, broad beans, Bovril, yeast extracts or
fermented soya bean products.
Pregnancy and breast-feeding
- You should not take Eldepryl if you are pregnant, planning to become
pregnant or if you think you may be pregnant.
- You should not take Eldepryl if you are breast-feeding.
Ask your doctor or pharmacist for advice before taking any medicine.
Driving and using machines
Eldepryl may make you feel dizzy, drowsy or slow your reactions, therefore
your ability to drive or operate machinery may be affected. If you
experience these side effects then do not drive, use tools or operate
machinery.
The medicine can affect your ability to drive as it may make you sleepy or
dizzy.
- Do not drive while taking this medicine until you know how it affects you.
- It is an offence to drive if this medicine affects your ability to drive.
- However, you would not be committing an offence if:
- The medicine has been prescribed to treat a medical or dental problem
and
- You have taken it according to the instructions given by the prescriber
or in the information provided with the medicine and
- It was not affecting your ability to drive safely
Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you are not sure whether it is safe for
you to drive while taking this medicine.
Children
Eldepryl should not be given to children.
3. HOW TO TAKE ELDEPRYL
Always take Eldepryl exactly as your doctor has told you. You should check
with your doctor or pharmacist if you are not sure.
Your doctor will normally start you on a dose of 10 mg Eldepryl each day.
This may be taken either as one 10 mg or two 5 mg tablets, or one 5 ml
spoonful of syrup.
- Eldepryl can be taken as a single daily dose in the morning, or the
prescribed daily dose taken in two parts, half dose in the morning and
half dose at lunchtime. If you take your tablets in the evening or before
going to bed they may keep you awake at night.

- Eldepryl syrup should be shaken well before use. Always replace the cap
after use.
- Your doctor will tell you how long you should continue to take this
medicine.
Make sure you ask your pharmacist if the label on your medicine does not
tell you how to take Eldepryl.
If you take more Eldepryl than you should
Your doctor has carefully chosen the correct dosage for you so do not take
more than the prescribed dose. However, if you accidentally take too much
Eldepryl immediately contact your doctor or contact your nearest hospital
casualty department.
Symptoms of an overdose include agitation, feeling irritable, restless or
tired, severe headache, shaking, high or low blood pressure, difficulty
breathing, shortness of breath, experiencing situations, visions or sounds
which are not real (hallucinations), dizziness, fast irregular heartbeat, chest
pain, severe muscle spasms, fever, excessive sweating, loss of
consciousness and fits.
If you forget to take Eldepryl
If you forget to take a dose, take a dose as soon as you remember, but do
not take more than the recommended dose every 24 hours.
If you stop taking Eldepryl
Do not stop taking Eldepryl unless told to do so by your doctor. If you have
any further questions on the use of this product, ask your doctor or
pharmacist.
If someone else takes your medicine
If someone else has swallowed any of your medicine, contact your nearest
hospital casualty department or tell a doctor immediately.
4. POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS
Like all medicines, Eldepryl can cause side effects, although not everybody
gets them.
Very Common (affecting more than 1 person in 10)
- Sore mouth and swollen gums (stomatitis).
Common (affecting more than 1 person in 100, but less than 1 in 10)
- Difficulty controlling your movements or loss of balance (dyskinesias,
akinesia, bradykinesia), fall
- slow heart beat (bradycardia)
- dizziness, feeling faint, headache, shaking
- sleep disorders, confusion, experiencing situations, visions or sounds
which are not real (hallucinations)
- feeling down (depressed)
- high or low blood pressure
- abnormal liver tests due to increase in liver enzymes
- feeling sick, constipation, diarrhoea, mouth ulcers
- blocked nose, sore throat
- back pain, joint pain (arthralgia), muscle cramps
- tiredness
- ear disorders giving the sensation of dizziness (vertigo)
- excessive sweating.
Uncommon (affecting more than 1 person in 1,000 but less than 1
person in 100)
- Chest pain (angina pectoris), irritability, swelling of the ankles
- irregular, erratic or fast heart beat, the sensation of feeling your heart
beat (palpitations)
- problems sleeping, strange dreams, feeling anxious or agitated, changes
in mood, altered mental state / loss of contact with reality (psychoses)
- shortness of breath (dyspnoea)
- blurred vision
- low blood pressure leading to a feeling of light-headedness particularly
when standing up (orthostatic hypotension)
- problems starting, passing and stopping urination or altered frequency of
urination (micturition disorders)
- abnormal liver tests due to increase in liver enzymes (transient rise of
serum alanine aminotransferase (ALAT))
- muscle weakness (myopathy)
- low level of white blood cells (leucocytopenia) and platelets
(thrombocytopenia) in the blood which may increase the risk of bleeding,
bruising or infections
- loss of appetite
- sore throat (pharyngitis), dry mouth
- hair loss, blisters or spots on skin.
Rare (affecting more than 1 person in 10,000 but less than 1 in 1,000)
- Low blood pressure leading to a feeling of light-headedness, dizziness or
fainting, particularly when standing up (postural hypotension)
- skin reactions.

Not Known (frequency cannot be estimated from the available data)
However these events can be considered to be very rare
- Hypersexuality (altered sexual interest and behaviour of significant
concern to the patient or to others)
- unusual urges and/or behaviours (such as excessive gambling or other
behaviours)
- inability or difficulty passing urine.
Side effects when Eldepryl is used with Levodopa
When Eldepryl is taken with levodopa this may increase the side effects of
levodopa such as:
- excessive, uncontrollable movements after taking your medicine
- confusion, hallucinations, problems sleeping, agitation, feeling restless
- feeling your heartbeat (palpitations), irregular, erratic heart beat, chest
pain, swollen ankles and shortness of breath
- a feeling of sickness, dizziness, feeling faint, dry mouth, loss of appetite
and problems passing urine
- low blood pressure leading to a feeling of light-headedness, particularly
when standing up
- hypersexuality (altered sexual interest and behaviour of significant
concern to the patient or to others)
- low level of white blood cells (leucocytopenia) and platelets
(thrombocytopenia) in the blood which may increase the risk of bleeding,
bruising or infections and temporary liver problems
- headache, skin reaction and loss of hair.
These side effects will usually stop when the amount of levodopa you are
taking is reduced.
Talk to your doctor about reducing the dose if you experience any of these
effects.
Reporting of side effects
If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor, pharmacist or nurse. This
includes any possible side effects not listed in this leaflet. You can also
report side effects directly via the Yellow Card Scheme at:
www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard.
By reporting side effects, you can help provide more information on the
safety of this medicine.
5. HOW TO STORE ELDEPRYL
Keep out of the sight and reach of children.
Do not store above 25ºC. Keep container tightly closed.
Do not use Eldepryl after the expiry date, which is stated on the carton after
EXP. The expiry date refers to the last day of that month.
If the tablets become discoloured or show any other signs of deterioration,
consult your pharmacist who will tell you what to do.
Medicines should not be disposed of via wastewater or household waste.
Ask you pharmacist how to dispose of medicine no longer required.
These measures will help to protect the environment
6. FURTHER INFORMATION
What Eldepryl contains
The active substance is selegiline hydrochloride.
Each tablet contains 5 mg selegiline hydrochloride.
The other ingredients are as follows: mannitol, maize starch,
microcrystalline cellulose, povidone and magnesium stearate.
What Eldepryl looks like and contents of the pack.
Eldepryl tablets are round and white in colour.
Eldepryl are available in a bottle of 100 tablets.
Product Licence Holder and Manufacturer
Manufactured by Orion Corporation, Orionintie 1, FI-02200 Espoo, Finland
and Procured from within the EU by Product Licence Holder:
Star Pharmaceuticals Ltd., 5 Sandridge Close, Harrow, Middlesex
HA1 1XD. Repackaged by Servipharm Ltd.
POM

PL 20636/2659

Leaflet revision and issue date (Ref) 10.04.15[2]
Eldepryl is a trademark of Orion Corporation.

Selegiline Hydrochloride 5 mg
Tablets

2659
10.04.15[2]

PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET
Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start taking this medicine.
- Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again.
- If you have any further questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist.
- This medicine has been prescribed for you. Do not pass it on to others. It
may harm them, even if their symptoms are the same as yours.
- If any of the side effects become serious, or if you notice any side effects
not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor or pharmacist.
Your medicine is available using the above name but will be referred to as
Selegiline Hydrochloride throughout the following leaflet.
Selegiline Hydrochloride is also available as a 10 mg Tablet and as
Eldepryl 10 mg/5 ml Syrup.
In this leaflet:
1. What Selegiline Hydrochloride is and what it is used for
2. Before you take Selegiline Hydrochloride
3. How to take Selegiline Hydrochloride
4. Possible side effects
5. How to store Selegiline Hydrochloride
6. Further information
1. WHAT SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE IS AND WHAT IT IS USED
FOR
Selegiline Hydrochloride is a monoamine oxidase-B inhibitor, and is used in
the treatment of
Parkinson’s disease. Selegiline Hydrochloride may be taken alone in the
early stages of your condition, delaying the need for the addition of other
medicines. Selegiline Hydrochloride however can also be used in
conjunction with other treatments such as Levodopa to reduce the on-off
symptoms or uncontrolled movements you may experience. This happens
especially when the effects of the other treatments are wearing-off.
Your doctor will explain why this medicine has been chosen for you.
2. BEFORE YOU TAKE SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE
Do not take Selegiline Hydrochloride
- if you are allergic (hypersensitive) to selegiline hydrochloride or any of the
other ingredients of Selegiline Hydrochloride (see Section 6: Further
Information)
- if you are taking any antidepressants (see Taking other medicines).
Antidepressants should be stopped a number of weeks before taking
Selegiline Hydrochloride, speak to your doctor for further advice
- if you are taking pethidine or any other opioid painkillers such as codeine
or tramadol
- if you are taking any monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors e.g. the
antibiotic linezolid
- if you are taking any medicines for migraine e.g. sumatriptan, naratriptan,
zolmitriptan and rizatriptan
- if you are taking any sympathomimetic medicines e.g. medicines used in
the treatment of asthma or to relieve nasal congestion
- if you suffer from stomach or duodenal ulcers
- if you suffer from a movement or muscle disorder not connected to
Parkinson’s disease.
Taking Selegiline Hydrochloride with Levodopa
Do not take Selegiline Hydrochloride together with Levodopa if you suffer
from any of the following conditions:
- major heart or blood vessel problems (cardiovascular disease)
- chest pain (angina)
- high blood pressure (arterial hypertension)
- an erratic or fast heartbeat (e.g. tachycardia or arrhythmias)
- an overactive thyroid gland (hyperthyroid disease)
- an eye condition called narrow angle glaucoma
- a tumour of your adrenal gland (phaeochromocytoma) or prostate
(prostatic adenoma)
- major mental health problems (e.g. schizophrenia or advanced
dementia).
Take special care with Selegiline Hydrochloride
Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if any of the following applies to you:
- if you have uncontrolled high blood pressure, chest pain (angina), the
sensation of feeling your heartbeat (palpitations) or an abnormal or erratic
heartbeat (arrhythmia)
- if you have kidney or liver problems
- if you are being treated for any mental illness, anxiety or sleep problems
- if you have a history of stomach ulcers
- if you are already taking a medicine called Levodopa as it can cause
agitation and uncontrollable movements. Your doctor may need to
monitor you closely and alter your dose

- if you are going to have surgery as Selegiline Hydrochloride may interfere
with some of the medicines used as part of a general anaesthetic
- if you have a history of any unusual urges and/or behaviours (such as
excessive gambling or excessive sexual behaviour). See section 4.
- if you are taking Eldepryl Syrup and you have been told by your doctor
that you have an intolerance to certain kinds of sugar.
Taking other medicines
Please tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking or have recently
taken any other medicines, including medicines obtained without a
prescription. In particular it is important that you tell your doctor if you are
taking any of the following:
- amantadine, dopamine or levodopa (used to treat Parkinson’s disease)
- any type of antidepressant e.g. citalopram, escitalopram, fluoxetine,
fluvoxamine, paroxetine, sertraline, venlafaxine, amitriptyline and
protriptyline cannot be taken with Selegiline Hydrochloride
- pethidine or any other opioid painkillers such as codeine or tramadol
cannot be taken with Selegiline Hydrochloride
- the antibiotic linezolid cannot be taken with Selegiline Hydrochloride
- if you are taking any sympathomimetic medicines e.g. medicines used in
the treatment of asthma or to relieve nasal congestion - these medicines
cannot be taken with Selegiline Hydrochloride
- any medicines for migraine e.g. sumatriptan, naratriptan, zolmitriptan and
rizatriptan cannot be taken with Selegiline Hydrochloride
- medicines for high or low blood pressure
- medicines for mood or mental illness
- medicines to treat anxiety, sleep problems or to relax the gut muscles
(medicines that act on the central nervous system)
- medicines used as part of an anaesthetic
- medicines to treat heart problems (e.g. digitalis) as you may need more
frequent check-ups with your doctor
- medicines to thin the blood (anticoagulants) as you may need more
frequent check-ups with your doctor
- HRT (hormone replacement therapy)
- altretamine (used to treat ovarian cancer)
- oral contraceptives (The ‘pill’, other forms of contraception should be
discussed with your doctor).
Selegiline Hydrochloride needs a period of time to be completely removed
from the body before starting certain other medicines. Please talk to your
doctor for advice if you are thinking about starting other medication.
Taking Selegiline Hydrochloride with food and drink
You may take Selegiline Hydrochloride with food and drink.
Alcohol should be avoided whilst you are taking Selegiline Hydrochloride.
Your doctor may recommend that you avoid certain foods containing
tyramine such as mature cheese, broad beans, Bovril, yeast extracts or
fermented soya bean products.
Pregnancy and breast-feeding
- You should not take Selegiline Hydrochloride if you are pregnant,
planning to become pregnant or if you think you may be pregnant.
- You should not take Selegiline Hydrochloride if you are breast-feeding.
Ask your doctor or pharmacist for advice before taking any medicine.
Driving and using machines
Selegiline Hydrochloride may make you feel dizzy, drowsy or slow your
reactions, therefore your ability to drive or operate machinery may be
affected. If you experience these side effects then do not drive, use tools or
operate machinery.
The medicine can affect your ability to drive as it may make you sleepy or
dizzy.
- Do not drive while taking this medicine until you know how it affects you.
- It is an offence to drive if this medicine affects your ability to drive.
- However, you would not be committing an offence if:
- The medicine has been prescribed to treat a medical or dental problem
and
- You have taken it according to the instructions given by the prescriber
or in the information provided with the medicine and
- It was not affecting your ability to drive safely
Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you are not sure whether it is safe for
you to drive while taking this medicine.
Children
Selegiline Hydrochloride should not be given to children.
3. HOW TO TAKE SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE
Always take Selegiline Hydrochloride exactly as your doctor has told you.
You should check with your doctor or pharmacist if you are not sure.
Your doctor will normally start you on a dose of 10 mg Selegiline
Hydrochloride each day.

This may be taken either as one 10 mg or two 5 mg tablets, or one 5 ml
spoonful of syrup.
- Selegiline Hydrochloride can be taken as a single daily dose in the
morning, or the prescribed daily dose taken in two parts, half dose in the
morning and half dose at lunchtime. If you take your tablets in the
evening or before going to bed they may keep you awake at night.
- Eldepryl syrup should be shaken well before use. Always replace the cap
after use.
- Your doctor will tell you how long you should continue to take this
medicine.
Make sure you ask your pharmacist if the label on your medicine does not
tell you how to take Selegiline Hydrochloride.

Rare (affecting more than 1 person in 10,000 but less than 1 in 1,000)
- Low blood pressure leading to a feeling of light-headedness, dizziness or
fainting, particularly when standing up (postural hypotension)
- skin reactions.

If you take more Selegiline Hydrochloride than you should
Your doctor has carefully chosen the correct dosage for you so do not take
more than the prescribed dose. However, if you accidentally take too much
Selegiline Hydrochloride immediately contact your doctor or contact your
nearest hospital casualty department.

Side effects when Selegiline Hydrochloride is used with Levodopa
When Selegiline Hydrochloride is taken with levodopa this may increase
the side effects of levodopa such as:
- excessive, uncontrollable movements after taking your medicine
- confusion, hallucinations, problems sleeping, agitation, feeling restless
- feeling your heartbeat (palpitations), irregular, erratic heart beat, chest
pain, swollen ankles and shortness of breath
- a feeling of sickness, dizziness, feeling faint, dry mouth, loss of appetite
and problems passing urine
- low blood pressure leading to a feeling of light-headedness, particularly
when standing up
- hypersexuality (altered sexual interest and behaviour of significant
concern to the patient or to others)
- low level of white blood cells (leucocytopenia) and platelets
(thrombocytopenia) in the blood which may increase the risk of bleeding,
bruising or infections and temporary liver problems
- headache, skin reaction and loss of hair.

Symptoms of an overdose include agitation, feeling irritable, restless or
tired, severe headache, shaking, high or low blood pressure, difficulty
breathing, shortness of breath, experiencing situations, visions or sounds
which are not real (hallucinations), dizziness, fast irregular heartbeat, chest
pain, severe muscle spasms, fever, excessive sweating, loss of
consciousness and fits.
If you forget to take Selegiline Hydrochloride
If you forget to take a dose, take a dose as soon as you remember, but do
not take more than the recommended dose every 24 hours.
If you stop taking Selegiline Hydrochloride
Do not stop taking Selegiline Hydrochloride unless told to do so by your
doctor. If you have any further questions on the use of this product, ask
your doctor or pharmacist.
If someone else takes your medicine
If someone else has swallowed any of your medicine, contact your nearest
hospital casualty department or tell a doctor immediately.
4. POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS
Like all medicines, Selegiline Hydrochloride can cause side effects,
although not everybody gets them.
Very Common (affecting more than 1 person in 10)
- Sore mouth and swollen gums (stomatitis).
Common (affecting more than 1 person in 100, but less than 1 in 10)
- Difficulty controlling your movements or loss of balance (dyskinesias,
akinesia, bradykinesia), fall
- slow heart beat (bradycardia)
- dizziness, feeling faint, headache, shaking
- sleep disorders, confusion, experiencing situations, visions or sounds
which are not real (hallucinations)
- feeling down (depressed)
- high or low blood pressure
- abnormal liver tests due to increase in liver enzymes
- feeling sick, constipation, diarrhoea, mouth ulcers
- blocked nose, sore throat
- back pain, joint pain (arthralgia), muscle cramps
- tiredness
- ear disorders giving the sensation of dizziness (vertigo)
- excessive sweating.
Uncommon (affecting more than 1 person in 1,000 but less than 1
person in 100)
- Chest pain (angina pectoris), irritability, swelling of the ankles
- irregular, erratic or fast heart beat, the sensation of feeling your heart
beat (palpitations)
- problems sleeping, strange dreams, feeling anxious or agitated, changes
in mood, altered mental state / loss of contact with reality (psychoses)
- shortness of breath (dyspnoea)
- blurred vision
- low blood pressure leading to a feeling of light-headedness particularly
when standing up (orthostatic hypotension)
- problems starting, passing and stopping urination or altered frequency of
urination (micturition disorders)
- abnormal liver tests due to increase in liver enzymes (transient rise of
serum alanine aminotransferase (ALAT))
- muscle weakness (myopathy)
- low level of white blood cells (leucocytopenia) and platelets
(thrombocytopenia) in the blood which may increase the risk of bleeding,
bruising or infections
- loss of appetite
- sore throat (pharyngitis), dry mouth
- hair loss, blisters or spots on skin.

Not Known (frequency cannot be estimated from the available data)
However these events can be considered to be very rare
- Hypersexuality (altered sexual interest and behaviour of significant
concern to the patient or to others)
- unusual urges and/or behaviours (such as excessive gambling or other
behaviours)
- inability or difficulty passing urine.

These side effects will usually stop when the amount of levodopa you are
taking is reduced.
Talk to your doctor about reducing the dose if you experience any of these
effects.
Reporting of side effects
If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor, pharmacist or nurse. This
includes any possible side effects not listed in this leaflet. You can also
report side effects directly via the Yellow Card Scheme at:
www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard.
By reporting side effects, you can help provide more information on the
safety of this medicine.
5. HOW TO STORE SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE
Keep out of the sight and reach of children.
Do not store above 25ºC. Keep container tightly closed.
Do not use Selegiline Hydrochloride after the expiry date, which is stated
on the carton after EXP. The expiry date refers to the last day of that
month.
If the tablets become discoloured or show any other signs of deterioration,
consult your pharmacist who will tell you what to do.
Medicines should not be disposed of via wastewater or household waste.
Ask you pharmacist how to dispose of medicine no longer required.
These measures will help to protect the environment
6. FURTHER INFORMATION
What Selegiline Hydrochloride contains
The active substance is selegiline hydrochloride.
Each tablet contains 5 mg selegiline hydrochloride
The other ingredients are as follows: mannitol, maize starch,
microcrystalline cellulose, povidone and magnesium stearate.
What Selegiline Hydrochloride looks like and contents of the pack.
Selegiline Hydrochloride tablets are round and white in colour.
Selegiline Hydrochloride are available in a bottle of 100 tablets.
Product Licence Holder and Manufacturer
Manufactured by Orion Corporation, Orionintie 1, FI-02200 Espoo, Finland
and Procured from within the EU by Product Licence Holder:
Star Pharmaceuticals Ltd., 5 Sandridge Close, Harrow, Middlesex
HA1 1XD. Repackaged by Servipharm Ltd.
POM

PL 20636/2659

Leaflet revision and issue date (Ref) 10.04.15[2]

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Source: Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided here is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. This information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. If you have questions about the substances you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

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