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DEHYDRATED ALCOHOL BP FOR INJECTION

Active substance(s): DEHYDRATED ALCOHOL

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Package leaflet: information for the user

Dehydrated Alcohol (Absolute Alcohol)
BP for Injection
Ethanol BP

C9133400000

Read all of this leaflet carefully before you are given this
medicine.
• Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again.
• If you have any further questions, please ask your doctor
or nurse.
• If any of the side effects gets serious, or if you notice any
side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor
or nurse.

In this leaflet:
1. What Dehydrated Alcohol for Injection is and what it is used for
2. Before you are given Dehydrated Alcohol for Injection
3. How Dehydrated Alcohol for Injection will be given
4. Possible side effects
5. How to store Dehydrated Alcohol for Injection
6. Further information

1. What Dehydrated Alcohol for Injection is and
what it is used for
• Dehydrated Alcohol (Absolute alcohol) BP for Injection is a
sterile solution of 100 % ethanol.
It is used to treat:
• severe pain including trigeminal neuralgia (a severe pain in
the jaw, lips, eyes and face)
• methanol poisoning.

2. Before you are given Dehydrated Alcohol for
Injection
You should NOT be given Dehydrated Alcohol for Injection if:
• you are allergic (hypersensitive) to ethanol.
Take special care with Dehydrated Alcohol
Tell your doctor if:
• you are pregnant or breast feeding
Taking other medicines:
Tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following:
• sleep-inducing drugs such as nitrazepam
• antihistamines such as chlorpheniramine or promethazine,
used to treat allergies
• muscle relaxants such as atracurium
• strong painkillers such as morphine
• medicines used in the treatment of epilepsy, such as
phenytoin
• medicines used to treat depression such as amitriptyline or
imipramine
• tranquillisers used to treat anxiety such as diazepam
• insulin or oral antidiabetic tablets such as chlorpropamide,
used to treat diabetes, as alcohol can also reduce blood
glucose levels
• metronidazole used to treat urinary tract infections
• cephalosporin antibiotics, such as cefalexin or cefaclor, used
to treat infections
• anti hypertensive agents used to lower blood pressure (ACE
inhibitors, beta-blockers and calcium channel blockers) such
as ramipril, captopril, propranolol, atenolol, diltiazem and
nifedipine.
• medicines used to thin the blood (anticoagulants), such as
warfarin and acenocoumarol.
Please tell your doctor or nurse if you are taking or have recently
taken any other medicines, including medicines obtained
without a prescription.
Pregnancy and breast-feeding:
If you are pregnant or breast-feeding you should talk to your
doctor before receiving this medicine.
Effects on the ability to drive and use machinery:
Alcohol affects your judgement and co-ordination. You should
not drive or operate machinery if you have recently been given
this medicine.

3. How Dehydrated Alcohol for Injection will be
given
The doctor or nurse will give you this medicine. They will decide
on how much will be given to you.
Treatment of severe pain (including trigeminal neuralgia):
The dose will depend on the location and severity of the pain.
The Dehydrated Alcohol will be given as an injection close to
the nerve.
Methanol poisoning;
The Dehydrated Alcohol is given as an infusion (drip) into a vein
over 30 minutes.
If you are given too much Dehydrated Alcohol for Injection:
Dehydrated Alcohol for Injection will be given to you by a doctor,
therefore it is unlikely that you will be given too much or that you
will miss a dose. However, if you are concerned about your
treatment, please talk to your doctor or nurse.

4. Possible side effects
Like all medicines Dehydrated Alcohol for Injection can cause
side effects, although not everybody gets them.
If you experience any of the following please tell your doctor or
nurse immediately. These are symptoms of an allergic reaction.
• difficulty breathing or swallowing
• swelling of face, lips, throat or tongue
• skin rash
Side effects which may occur with low to moderate levels of
alcohol are:
• loss of co-ordinated body movements (unsteadiness,
clumsiness)
• loss of judgement
• mood changes/swings
• blurred vision
• slurred speech.
Other side effects include:
• drowsiness, loss of energy
• memory loss
• loss of body heat (feeling cold)
• low blood sugar levels (especially in children)
• loss of consciousness or loss of awareness
• breathing difficulties
• coma
• heart failure.
If any of the side effects gets serious, or you notice any side
effects not listed in the leaflet, please tell your doctor or nurse.

5. How to store Dehydrated Alcohol for Injection
Keep out of the reach and sight of children.
Do not use Dehydrated Alcohol for Injection after the expiry date
which is stated on the ampoule and carton labels. The expiry
date refers to the last day of that month. The doctor or nurse will
check that the product has not passed this date.

6. Further Information
What Dehydrated Alcohol for Injection contains:
The active ingredient is ethanol 100% v/v.
There are no other ingredients.
What Dehydrated Alcohol for Injection looks like and
contents of the pack:
Dehydrated Alcohol for Injection is a clear colourless solution.
The product is supplied in clear glass ampoules containing
2 ml, 5 ml, 10 ml, 20 ml or 50 ml of solution. Each pack contains
10 ampoules.
Not all pack sizes may be marketed.
Marketing Authorisation Holder and Manufacturer:
Martindale Pharmaceuticals, Bampton Road,
Harold Hill, Romford, RM3 8UG, UK
Product Licence Number: PL 01883/6119
This leaflet was last revised in: November 2008
© Martindale Pharmaceuticals

C9133400000

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Source: Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided here is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. This information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. If you have questions about the substances you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

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