Skip to Content

Clin-Lido

Generic Name: clindamycin, lidocaine hcl, and sodium bicarbonate
Dosage Form: injection

-------------------- CLINDAMYCIN- clindamycin phosphate injection, solution --------------------

Rx only

Injection, USP

Fliptop Vial

To reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of clindamycin and other antibacterial drugs, clindamycin should be used only to treat or prevent infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by bacteria.

Warning

Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea (CDAD) has been reported with use of nearly all antibacterial agents, including clindamycin, and may range in severity from mild diarrhea to fatal colitis. Treatment with antibacterial agents alters the normal flora of the colon leading to overgrowth of C. difficile.

Because clindamycin therapy has been associated with severe colitis which may end fatally, it should be reserved for serious infections where less toxic antimicrobial agents are inappropriate, as described in the INDICATIONS AND USAGE section. It should not be used in patients with nonbacterial infections such as most upper respiratory tract infections. C. difficile produces toxins A and B which contribute to the development of CDAD. Hypertoxin producing strains of C. difficile cause increased morbidity and mortality, as these infections can be refractory to antimicrobial therapy and may require colectomy. CDAD must be considered in all patients who present with diarrhea following antibiotic use. Careful medical history is necessary since CDAD has been reported to occur over two months after the administration of antibacterial agents.

If CDAD is suspected or confirmed, ongoing antibiotic use not directed against C. difficile may need to be discontinued. Appropriate fluid and electrolyte management, protein supplementation, antibiotic treatment of C. difficile, and surgical evaluation should be instituted as clinically indicated.

Clin-Lido Description

Clindamycin Injection, USP, a water soluble ester of clindamycin and phosphoric acid, is a sterile solution for intramuscular or intravenous use.

May contain sodium hydroxide and/or hydrochloric acid for pH adjustment. pH is 6.5 range 5.5 to 7.0.

Clindamycin is a semisynthetic antibiotic produced by a 7(S)-chloro-substitution of the 7(R)-hydroxyl group of the parent compound lincomycin.

The chemical name of clindamycin phosphate is methyl 7-chloro-6,7,8-trideoxy-6-(1-methyl- trans-4-propyl-L-2-pyrrolidinecarboxamido)-1-thio-L- threo-α-D- galacto-octopyranoside 2-(dihydrogen phosphate).

The molecular formula is C 18H 34ClN 2O 8PS and the molecular weight is 504.97.

The structural formula is represented below:

Each mL contains clindamycin phosphate equivalent to 150 mg clindamycin, 0.5 mg disodium edetate and 9.45 mg benzyl alcohol added as a preservative.

Clin-Lido - Clinical Pharmacology

Distribution

Biologically inactive clindamycin phosphate is converted to active clindamycin.

By the end of short-term intravenous infusion, peak serum levels of active clindamycin are reached.

After intramuscular injection of clindamycin phosphate, peak levels of active clindamycin are reached within 3 hours in adults and 1 hour in pediatric patients. Serum level curves may be constructed from IV peak serum levels as given in Table 1 by application of elimination half-lives (see Excretion).

Serum levels of clindamycin can be maintained above the in vitro minimum inhibitory concentrations for most indicated organisms by administration of clindamycin phosphate every 8 to 12 hours in adults and every 6 to 8 hours in pediatric patients, or by continuous intravenous infusion. An equilibrium state is reached by the third dose.

No significant levels of clindamycin are attained in the cerebrospinal fluid even in the presence of inflamed meninges.

Excretion

Biologically inactive clindamycin phosphate disappears rapidly from the serum; the average elimination half-life is 6 minutes; however, the serum elimination half-life of active clindamycin is about 3 hours in adults and 2½ hours in pediatric patients.

Special Populations

Renal/Hepatic Impairment

The elimination half-life of clindamycin is increased slightly in patients with markedly reduced renal or hepatic function. Hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis are not effective in removing clindamycin from the serum. Dosage schedules need not be modified in the presence of mild or moderate renal or hepatic disease.

Use in Elderly

Pharmacokinetic studies in elderly volunteers (61 to 79 years) and younger adults (18 to 39 years) indicate that age alone does not alter clindamycin pharmacokinetics (clearance, elimination half-life, volume of distribution, and area under the serum concentration-time curve) after IV administration of clindamycin phosphate. After oral administration of clindamycin hydrochloride, elimination half-life is increased to approximately 4.0 hours (range 3.4 to 5.1 h) in the elderly, compared to 3.2 hours (range 2.1 to 4.2 h) in younger adults. The extent of absorption, however, is not different between age groups and no dosage alteration is necessary for the elderly with normal hepatic function and normal (age-adjusted) renal function 1.

Serum assays for active clindamycin require an inhibitor to prevent in vitro hydrolysis of clindamycin phosphate.

Table 1. Average Peak and Trough Serum Concentrations of Active Clindamycin After Dosing with Clindamycin Phosphate
*
Data in this group from patients being treated for infection.

Dosage Regimen

Peak mcg/mL

Trough mcg/mL

Healthy Adult Males (Post equilibrium)

600 mg IV in 30 min q6h

600 mg IV in 30 min q8h

900 mg IV in 30 min q8h

600 mg IM q12h *

10.9

10.8

14.1

9

2

1.1

1.7

Pediatric Patients (first dose)*

5-7 mg/kg IV in 1 hour

5-7 mg/kg IM

3-5 mg/kg IM

10

8

4

Microbiology

Clindamycin inhibits bacterial protein synthesis by binding to the 50S subunit of the ribosome. It has activity against Gram-positive aerobes and anaerobes, as well as some Gram-negative anaerobes. Clindamycin is bacteriostatic. Cross-resistance between clindamycin and lincomycin is complete. Antagonism in vitro has been demonstrated between clindamycin and erythromycin. Clindamycin inducible resistance has been identified in macrolide-resistant staphylococci and beta-hemolytic streptococci. Macrolide-resistant isolates of these organisms should be screened for clindamycin inducible resistance using the D-zone test.

Clindamycin has been shown to be active against most of the isolates of the following microorganisms, both in vitro and in clinical infections, as described in the INDICATIONS AND USAGEsection.

Gram- positive Aerobes

Staphylococcus aureus (methicillin-susceptible strains)
Streptococcus pneumoniae (penicillin-susceptible strains)
Streptococcus pyogenes

Anaerobes

Prevotella melaninogenica
Fusobacterium necrophorum
Fusobacterium nucleatum
Peptostreptococcus anaerobius
Clostridium perfringens

At least 90% of the microorganisms listed below exhibit in vitro minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) less than or equal to the clindamycin susceptible MIC breakpoint for organisms of a similar type to those shown in Table 2. However, the efficacy of clindamycin in treating clinical infections due to these microorganisms has not been established in adequate and well-controlled clinical trials.

Gram- positive aerobes

Staphylococcus epidermidis (methicillin-susceptible strains)
Streptococcus agalactiae
Streptococcus anginosus
Streptococcus oralis
Streptococcus mitis

Anaerobes

Prevotella intermedia Finegoldia (“Peptostreptococcus”) magna
Prevotella bivia Actinomyces israelii
Propionibacterium acnes Clostridium clostridioforme
Micromonas (“Peptostreptococcus”) micros Eubacterium lentum

Susceptibility Testing Methods

When available, the clinical microbiology laboratory should provide cumulative in vitro susceptibility test results for antimicrobial drugs used in local hospitals and practice areas to the physician as periodic reports that describe the susceptibility profile of nosocomial and community-acquired pathogens. These reports should aid the physician in selecting the most effective antimicrobial.

Dilution Techniques

Quantitative methods are used to determine antimicrobial minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). These MICs provide estimates of the susceptibility of bacteria to antimicrobial compounds. The MICs should be determined using a standardized procedure based on dilution methods (broth, agar or microdilution) 2,3 or equivalent using standardized inoculum and concentrations of clindamycin. The MIC values should be interpreted according to the criteria provided in Table 2.

Diffusion Techniques

Quantitative methods that require the measurement of zone diameters also provide reproducible estimates of the susceptibility of bacteria to antimicrobial compounds. The standardized procedure 2,4 requires the use of standardized inoculum concentrations. This procedure uses paper disks impregnated with 2 mcg of clindamycin to test the susceptibility of microorganisms to clindamycin. Reports from the laboratory providing results of the standard single-disk susceptibility test with a 2 mcg clindamycin disk should be interpreted according to the criteria in Table 2.

Table 2. Susceptibility Interpretive Criteria for Clindamycin
NA=not applicable

Pathogen

Susceptibility Interpretive Criteria

Minimal Inhibitory

Concentrations

(MIC in mcg/mL)

Disk Diffusion

(Zone Diameters in mm)

S

I

R

S

I

R

Staphylococcus spp.

≤0.5

1 to 2

≥4

≥21

15 to 20

≤14

Streptococcus pneumoniae and other Streptococcus spp.

≤0.25

0.5

≥1

≥19

16 to 18

≤15

Anaerobic Bacteria

≤2

4

≥8

NA

NA

NA

A report of “Susceptible” indicates that the pathogen is likely to be inhibited if the antimicrobial compound in the blood reaches the concentrations usually achievable. A report of “Intermediate” indicates that the result should be considered equivocal, and, if the microorganism is not fully susceptible to alternative, clinically feasible drugs, the test should be repeated. This category implies possible clinical applicability in body sites where the drug is physiologically concentrated or in situations where high dosage of drug can be used. This category also provides a buffer zone that prevents small, uncontrolled technical factors from causing major discrepancies in interpretation.

A report of “Resistant” indicates that the pathogen is not likely to be inhibited if the antimicrobial compound in the blood reaches the concentrations usually achievable; other therapy should be selected.

Quality Control

Standardized susceptibility test procedures require the use of laboratory controls to monitor and ensure the accuracy and precision of the supplies and reagents used in the assay, and the techniques of the individuals performing the test. 2,3,4,5 Standard clindamycin powder should provide the MIC ranges in Table 3. For the disk diffusion technique using the 2 mcg clindamycin disk the criteria provided in Table 2 should be achieved.

Table 3. Acceptable Quality Control Ranges for Clindamycin to be Used in Validation of Susceptibility Test Results
NA =not applicable
ATCC ® is a registered trademark of the American Type Culture Collection

QC Strain

Acceptable Quality Control Ranges

Minimum Inhibitory

Concentration Range

(mcg/mL)

Disk Diffusion Range

(Zone Diameters in mm)

When Testing Aerobic Pathogens

Staphylococcus aureus

ATCC 29213

0.06 to 0.25

NA

Staphylococcus aureus

ATCC 25923

NA

24 to 30

Streptococcus pneumoniae

ATCC 49619

0.03 to 0.12

19 to 25

When Testing Anaerobes

Bacteroides fragilis

ATCC 25285

0.5 to 2

NA

Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

ATCC 29741

2 to 8

NA

Eubacterium lentum

ATCC 43055

0.06 to 0.25

NA

Indications and Usage for Clin-Lido

Clindamycin Injection, USP is indicated in the treatment of serious infections caused by susceptible anaerobic bacteria.

Clindamycin Injection, USP is also indicated in the treatment of serious infections due to susceptible strains of streptococci, pneumococci, and staphylococci. Its use should be reserved for penicillin-allergic patients or other patients for whom, in the judgment of the physician, a penicillin is inappropriate. Because of the risk of antibiotic-associated pseudomembranous colitis, as described in the WARNING box, before selecting clindamycin the physician should consider the nature of the infection and the suitability of less toxic alternatives (e.g., erythromycin).

Bacteriologic studies should be performed to determine the causative organisms and their susceptibility to clindamycin.

Indicated surgical procedures should be performed in conjunction with antibiotic therapy.

Clindamycin Injection, USP is indicated in the treatment of serious infections caused by susceptible strains of the designated organisms in the conditions listed below:

Lower respiratory tract infections including pneumonia, empyema, and lung abscess caused by anaerobes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, other streptococci (except E. faecalis), and Staphylococcusaureus.

Skin and skin structure infections caused by Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, and anaerobes.

Gynecological infections including endometritis, nongonococcal tubo-ovarian abscess, pelvic cellulitis, and postsurgical vaginal cuff infection caused by susceptible anaerobes.

Intra-abdominal infections including peritonitis and intra-abdominal abscess caused by susceptible anaerobic organisms.

Septicemia caused by Staphylococcus aureus, streptococci (except Enterococcus faecalis), and susceptible anaerobes.

Bone and joint infections including acute hematogenous osteomyelitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus and as adjunctive therapy in the surgical treatment of chronic bone and joint infections due to susceptible organisms.

To reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of clindamycin and other antibacterial drugs, clindamycin should be used only to treat or prevent infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by susceptible bacteria. When culture and susceptibility information are available, they should be considered in selecting or modifying antibacterial therapy. In the absence of such data, local epidemiology and susceptibility patterns may contribute to the empiric selection of therapy.

Contraindications

This drug is contraindicated in individuals with a history of hypersensitivity to preparations containing clindamycin or lincomycin.

Warnings

See WARNINGbox.

Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea

Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea (CDAD) has been reported with use of nearly all antibacterial agents, including clindamycin, and may range in severity from mild diarrhea to fatal colitis. Treatment with antibacterial agents alters the normal flora of the colon leading to overgrowth of C. difficile.

C. difficile produces toxins A and B which contribute to the development of CDAD. Hypertoxin producing strains of C. difficile cause increased morbidity and mortality, as these infections can be refractory to antimicrobial therapy and may require colectomy. CDAD must be considered in all patients who present with diarrhea following antibiotic use. Careful medical history is necessary since CDAD has been reported to occur over two months after the administration of antibacterial agents.

If CDAD is suspected or confirmed, ongoing antibiotic use not directed against C. difficile may need to be discontinued. Appropriate fluid and electrolyte management, protein supplementation, antibiotic treatment of C. difficile, and surgical evaluation should be instituted as clinically indicated.

Severe Skin Reactions

Severe skin reactions such as Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis, some with fatal outcome, have been reported. In case of such an event, treatment should be permanently discontinued.

A careful inquiry should be made concerning previous sensitivities to drugs and other allergens.

Benzyl Alcohol Toxicity in Pediatric Patients (“Gasping Syndrome”)

This product contains benzyl alcohol as a preservative. The preservative benzyl alcohol has been associated with serious adverse events, including the “Gasping Syndrome”, and death in pediatric patients. Although normal therapeutic doses of this product ordinarily deliver amounts of benzyl alcohol that are substantially lower than those reported in association with the “gasping syndrome”, the minimum amount of benzyl alcohol at which toxicity may occur is not known. The risk of benzyl alcohol toxicity depends on the quantity administered and the hepatic capacity to detoxify the chemical. Premature and low birth weight infants may be more likely to develop toxicity.

Usage in Meningitis

Since clindamycin does not diffuse adequately into the cerebrospinal fluid, the drug should not be used in the treatment of meningitis.

SERIOUS ANAPHYLACTOID REACTIONS REQUIRE IMMEDIATE EMERGENCY TREATMENT WITH EPINEPHRINE. OXYGEN AND INTRAVENOUS CORTICOSTEROIDS SHOULD ALSO BE ADMINISTERED AS INDICATED.

Precautions

General

Review of experience to date suggests that a subgroup of older patients with associated severe illness may tolerate diarrhea less well. When clindamycin is indicated in these patients, they should be carefully monitored for change in bowel frequency.

Clindamycin phosphate should be prescribed with caution in individuals with a history of gastrointestinal disease, particularly colitis.

Clindamycin phosphate should be prescribed with caution in atopic individuals.

Certain infections may require incision and drainage or other indicated surgical procedures in addition to antibiotic therapy.

The use of clindamycin phosphate may result in overgrowth of nonsusceptible organisms – particularly yeasts. Should superinfections occur, appropriate measures should be taken as indicated by the clinical situation.

Clindamycin phosphate should not be injected intravenously undiluted as a bolus, but should be infused over at least 10 to 60 minutes as directed in the DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATIONsection.

Clindamycin dosage modification may not be necessary in patients with renal disease. In patients with moderate to severe liver disease, prolongation of clindamycin half-life has been found. However, it was postulated from studies that when given every eight hours, accumulation should rarely occur. Therefore, dosage modification in patients with liver disease may not be necessary. However, periodic liver enzyme determinations should be made when treating patients with severe liver disease.

Prescribing clindamycin in the absence of a proven or strongly suspected bacterial infection or a prophylactic indication is unlikely to provide benefit to the patient and increases the risk of the development of drug-resistant bacteria.

Information for Patients

Patients should be counseled that antibacterial drugs including clindamycin should only be used to treat bacterial infections. They do not treat viral infections (e.g., the common cold). When clindamycin is prescribed to treat a bacterial infection, patients should be told that although it is common to feel better early in the course of therapy, the medication should be taken exactly as directed. Skipping doses or not completing the full course of therapy may (1) decrease the effectiveness of the immediate treatment and (2) increase the likelihood that bacteria will develop resistance and will not be treatable by clindamycin or other antibacterial drugs in the future.

Diarrhea is a common problem caused by antibiotics which usually ends when the antibiotic is discontinued. Sometimes after starting treatment with antibiotics, patients can develop watery and bloody stools (with or without stomach cramps and fever) even as late as two or more months after having taken the last dose of the antibiotic. If this occurs, patients should contact their physician as soon as possible.

Laboratory Tests

During prolonged therapy periodic liver and kidney function tests and blood counts should be performed.

Drug Interactions

Clindamycin has been shown to have neuromuscular blocking properties that may enhance the action of other neuromuscular blocking agents. Therefore, it should be used with caution in patients receiving such agents.

Antagonism has been demonstrated between clindamycin and erythromycin in vitro. Because of possible clinical significance, the two drugs should not be administered concurrently.

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility

Long term studies in animals have not been performed with clindamycin to evaluate carcinogenic potential. Genotoxicity tests performed included a rat micronucleus test and an Ames Salmonella reversion test. Both tests were negative.

Fertility studies in rats treated orally with up to 300 mg/kg/day (approximately 1.1 times the highest recommended adult human dose based on mg/m 2) revealed no effects on fertility or mating ability.

Pregnancy: Teratogenic Effects

Pregnancy Category B

In clinical trials with pregnant women, the systemic administration of clindamycin during the second and third trimesters, has not been associated with an increased frequency of congenital abnormalities.

Clindamycin should be used during the first trimester of pregnancy only if clearly needed. There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women during the first trimester of pregnancy. Because animal reproduction studies are not always predictive of the human response, this drug should be used during pregnancy only if clearly needed.

Reproduction studies performed in rats and mice using oral doses of clindamycin up to 600 mg/kg/day (2.1 and 1.1 times the highest recommended adult human dose based on mg/m 2, respectively) or subcutaneous doses of clindamycin up to 250 mg/kg/day (0.9 and 0.5 times the highest recommended adult human dose based on mg/m 2, respectively) revealed no evidence of teratogenicity.

Clindamycin contains benzyl alcohol. Benzyl alcohol can cross the placenta (see WARNINGS).

Nursing Mothers

Clindamycin has been reported to appear in breast milk in the range of 0.7 to 3.8 mcg/mL at dosages of 150 mg orally to 600 mg intravenously. Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants, clindamycin should not be taken by nursing mothers.

Pediatric Use

When clindamycin phosphate injection is administered to the pediatric population (birth to 16 years) appropriate monitoring of organ system functions is desirable.

Usage in Newborns and Infants

This product contains benzyl alcohol as a preservative. Benzyl alcohol has been associated with a fatal “Gasping Syndrome” in premature infants (see WARNINGS).

The potential for the toxic effect in the pediatric population from chemicals that may leach from the single dose premixed IV preparation in plastic has not been evaluated (see WARNINGS).

Geriatric Use

Clinical studies of clindamycin did not include sufficient numbers of patients age 65 and over to determine whether they respond differently from younger patients. However, other reported clinical experience indicates that antibiotic-associated colitis and diarrhea (due to Clostridium difficile) seen in association with most antibiotics occur more frequently in the elderly (>60 years) and may be more severe. These patients should be carefully monitored for the development of diarrhea.

Pharmacokinetic studies with clindamycin have shown no clinically important differences between young and elderly subjects with normal hepatic function and normal (age-adjusted) renal function after oral or intravenous administration.

Adverse Reactions

The following reactions have been reported with the use of clindamycin.

Gastrointestinal

Antibiotic-associated colitis (see WARNINGS), pseudomembranous colitis, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. The onset of pseudomembranous colitis symptoms may occur during or after antibacterial treatment (see WARNINGS). An unpleasant or metallic taste occasionally has been reported after intravenous administration of the higher doses of clindamycin phosphate.

Hypersensitivity Reactions

Maculopapular rash and urticaria have been observed during drug therapy. Generalized mild to moderate morbilliform-like skin rashes are the most frequently reported of all adverse reactions. Severe skin reactions such as Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis, some with fatal outcome, have been reported (see WARNINGS) . Cases of Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis (AGEP), erythema multiforme, some resembling Stevens-Johnson syndrome, have been associated with clindamycin. Anaphylactoid reactions have also been reported. If a hypersensitivity reaction occurs, the drug should be discontinued. The usual agents (epinephrine, corticosteroids, antihistamines) should be available for emergency treatment of serious reactions.

Skin and Mucous Membranes

Pruritus, vaginitis, and rare instances of exfoliative dermatitis have been reported (see Hypersensitivity Reactions).

Liver

Jaundice and abnormalities in liver function tests have been observed during clindamycin therapy.

Renal

Although no direct relationship of clindamycin to renal damage has been established, renal dysfunction as evidenced by azotemia, oliguria, and/or proteinuria has been observed.

Hematopoietic

Transient neutropenia (leukopenia) and eosinophilia have been reported. Reports of agranulocytosis and thrombocytopenia have been made. No direct etiologic relationship to concurrent clindamycin therapy could be made in any of the foregoing.

Immune system

Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) cases have been reported.

Local Reactions

Injection site irritation, pain, induration and sterile abscess have been reported after intramuscular injection and thrombophlebitis after intravenous infusion. Reactions can be minimized or avoided by giving deep intramuscular injections and avoiding prolonged use of indwelling intravenous catheters.

Musculoskeletal

Polyarthritis have been reported.

Cardiovascular

Cardiopulmonary arrest and hypotension have been reported following too rapid intravenous administration. (See DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATIONsection.)

Overdosage

Significant mortality was observed in mice at an intravenous dose of 855 mg/kg and in rats at an oral or subcutaneous dose of approximately 2618 mg/kg. In the mice, convulsions and depression were observed.

Hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis are not effective in removing clindamycin from the serum.

Clin-Lido Dosage and Administration

If diarrhea occurs during therapy, this antibiotic should be discontinued. (See WARNING box).

Adults

Parenteral (IM or IV Administration):

Serious infections due to aerobic gram-positive cocci and the more susceptible anaerobes (NOT generally including Bacteroides fragilis, Peptococcus species and Clostridium species other than Clostridium perfringens):

600 to 1200 mg/day in 2, 3 or 4 equal doses.

More severe infections, particularly those due to proven or suspected Bacteroides fragilis, Peptococcus species, or Clostridium species other than Clostridium perfringens:

1200 to 2700 mg/day in 2, 3 or 4 equal doses.

For more serious infections, these doses may have to be increased. In life-threatening situations due to either aerobes or anaerobes these doses may be increased. Doses of as much as 4800 mg daily have been given intravenously to adults. See Dilution and Infusion Rates section below.

Single IM injections of greater than 600 mg are not recommended.

Alternatively, drug may be administered in the form of a single rapid infusion of the first dose followed by continuous IV infusion as follows:

To maintain serum
clindamycin levels

Rapid infusion rate

Maintenance
infusion rate

Above 4 mcg/mL

10 mg/min for 30 min

0.75 mg/min

Above 5 mcg/mL

15 mg/min for 30 min

1.00 mg/min

Above 6 mcg/mL

20 mg/min for 30 min

1.25 mg/min

Neonates (less than 1 month)

15 to 20 mg/kg/day in three to four equal doses. The lower dosage may be adequate for small prematures.

Pediatric patients (1 month of age to 16 years)

Parenteral (IM or IV) administration: 20 to 40 mg/kg/day in 3 or 4 equal doses. The higher doses would be used for more severe infections. As an alternative to dosing on a body weight basis, pediatric patients may be dosed on the basis of square meters body surface: 350 mg/m 2/day for serious infections and 450 mg/m 2/day for more severe infections.

Parenteral therapy may be changed to clindamycin palmitate hydrochloride for oral solution or clindamycin hydrochloride capsules when the condition warrants and at the discretion of the physician.

In cases of β-hemolytic streptococcal infections, treatment should be continued for at least 10 days.

Dilution and Infusion Rates

Clindamycin phosphate must be diluted prior to I.V. administration. The concentration of clindamycin in diluent for infusion should not exceed 18 mg per mL. Infusion rates should notexceed 30 mg per minute.

The usual infusion dilutions and rates are as follows:

Dose

Diluent

Time

300 mg

50 mL

10 min

600 mg

50 mL

20 min

900 mg

50-100 mL

30 min

1200 mg

100 mL

40 min

Administration of more than 1200 mg in a single 1-hour infusion is not recommended.

Parenteral drug products should be inspected visually for particulate matter and discoloration prior to administration, whenever solution and container permit.

Dilution and Compatibility

Physical and biological compatibility studies monitored for 24 hours at room temperature have demonstrated no inactivation or incompatibility with the use of clindamycin phosphate in IV solutions containing sodium chloride, glucose, calcium or potassium, and solutions containing vitamin B complex in concentrations usually used clinically. No incompatibility has been demonstrated with the antibiotics cephalothin, kanamycin, gentamicin, penicillin or carbenicillin.

The following drugs are physically incompatible with clindamycin phosphate: ampicillin sodium, phenytoin sodium, barbiturates, aminophylline, calcium gluconate, and magnesium sulfate.

The compatibility and duration of stability of drug admixtures will vary depending on concentration and other conditions.

Physico-Chemical Stability of Diluted Solutions of Clindamycin

Room temperature: 6, 9, and 12 mg/mL (equivalent to clindamycin base) in 5% Dextrose Injection, 0.9% Sodium Chloride Injection, or Lactated Ringer’s Injection in glass bottles or minibags, demonstrated physical and chemical stability for at least 16 days at 25°C. Also, 18 mg/mL (equivalent to clindamycin base) in 5% Dextrose Injection, in minibags, demonstrated physical and chemical stability for at least 16 days at 25°C.

Refrigeration: 6, 9 and 12 mg/mL (equivalent to clindamycin base) in 5% Dextrose Injection, 0.9% Sodium Chloride Injection, or Lactated Ringer’s Injection in glass bottles or minibags, demonstrated physical and chemical stability for at least 32 days at 4°C.

IMPORTANT: This chemical stability information in no way indicates that it would be acceptable practice to use this product well after the preparation time. Good professional practice suggests that compounded admixtures should be administered as soon after preparation as is feasible.

Frozen: 6, 9 and 12 mg/mL (equivalent to clindamycin base) in 5% Dextrose Injection,
0.9% Sodium Chloride Injection, or Lactated Ringer’s Injection in minibags demonstrated physical and chemical stability for at least eight weeks at -10°C.

Frozen solutions should be thawed at room temperature and not refrozen.

How is Clin-Lido Supplied

Clindamycin Injection, USP (150 mg/mL) is supplied as follows:

NDC No.

Volume

Type Container

Clindamycin base

Total Content

0409-4050-01

2 mL

Single-dose fliptop vial/
25 vials per tray

300 mg

0409-4051-01

4 mL

Single-dose fliptop vial/
25 vials per tray

600 mg

0409-4052-01

6 mL

Single-dose fliptop vial/
25 vials per tray

900 mg

Store at 20 to 25°C (68 to 77°F). [See USP Controlled Room Temperature.]

Do not refrigerate.

REFERENCES

  • Smith RB, Phillips JP: Evaluation of CLEOCIN HCl and CLEOCIN Phosphate in an Aged Population. Upjohn TR 8147-82-9122-021, December 1982.
  • CLSI. Performance Standards for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing: Twenty-fourth Informational Supplement. CLSI document M 100-S24. Wayne, PA: Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute; 2014.
  • CLSI. Methods for Dilution Antimicrobial Susceptibility Tests for Bacteria that Grow Aerobically; Approved Standard – Ninth Edition. CLSI document M07-A9. Wayne, PA: Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute; 2012.
  • CLSI. Performance Standards for Antimicrobial Disk Susceptibility Tests;Approved Standard – Eleventh Edition. CLSI document M02-A11. Wayne, PA: Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute; 2012.
  • CLSI. Methods for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Anaerobic Bacteria; Approved Standard – Eighth Edition. CLSI document M11-A8. Wayne, PA: Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute; 2012.

Revised: 8/2014

EN-3625

Hospira, Inc., Lake Forest, IL 60045 USA

IM-0666

-------------------- LIDOCAINE injection, solution --------------------

For Infiltration and Nerve Block.

Ampul

Fliptop Vial

Multiple-dose Fliptop Vial

Protect from light.


Rx only

Clin-Lido Description

Lidocaine Hydrochloride and Epinephrine Injection, USP is a sterile, nonpyrogenic solution of lidocaine hydrochloride and epinephrine in water for injection for parenteral administration in various concentrations with characteristics as follows:

Concentration

Lidocaine HCl

Epinephrine

Lidocaine HCl

(anhyd.) mg/mL

Epinephrine

mcg/mL

Sodium Chloride

mg/mL

0.5%

1:200,000

5

5

8

1%

1:200,000

10

5

7

1.5%

1:200,000

15

5

6.5

2%

1:200,000

20

5

6

1%

1:100,000

10

10

7

2%

1:100,000

20

10

6

Sodium metabisulfite 0.5 mg/mL and citric acid, anhydrous 0.2 mg/mL added as stabilizers. The headspace of Lists 1209, and 3179 are carbon dioxide gassed and Lists 3177, 3178, 3181, 3182 and 3183 are nitrogen gassed. May contain sodium hydroxide and/or hydrochloric acid to adjust pH; pH is 4.5 (3.3 to 5.5). See HOW SUPPLIED section for various sizes and strengths.

Multiple-dose vials contain methylparaben 1 mg/mL added as preservative.

Single-dose ampuls and vials contain no bacteriostat or antimicrobial agent. Discard unused portion.

Lidocaine is a local anesthetic of the amide type.

Lidocaine Hydrochloride, USP is chemically designated 2-(diethyl-amino)-2’,6’-acetoxylidide monohydrochloride monohydrate, a white powder freely soluble in water. It has the following structural formula:


Epinephrine, USP is a sympathomimetic (adrenergic) agent designated chemically as 4-[1-hydroxy-2 (methylamino) ethyl]-1,2 benzenediol, a white, microcrystalline powder. It has the following structural formula:


Clin-Lido - Clinical Pharmacology

Mechanism of action: Lidocaine stabilizes the neuronal membrane by inhibiting the ionic fluxes required for the initiation and conduction of impulses, thereby effecting local anesthetic action.

Hemodynamics: Excessive blood levels may cause changes in cardiac output, total peripheral resistance, and mean arterial pressure. With central neural blockade these changes may be attributable to block of autonomic fibers, a direct depressant effect of the local anesthetic agent on various components of the cardiovascular system and/or the beta-adrenergic receptor stimulating action of epinephrine when present. The net effect is normally a modest hypotension when the recommended dosages are not exceeded.

Pharmacokinetics and metabolism: Information derived from diverse formulations, concentrations and usages reveals that lidocaine is completely absorbed following parenteral administration, its rate of absorption depending, for example, upon various factors such as the site of administration and the presence or absence of a vasoconstrictor agent. Except for intravascular administration, the highest blood levels are obtained following intercostal nerve block and the lowest after subcutaneous administration.

The plasma binding of lidocaine is dependent on drug concentration, and the fraction bound decreases with increasing concentration. At concentrations of 1 to 4 µg of free base per mL, 60 to 80 percent of lidocaine is protein bound. Binding is also dependent on the plasma concentration of the alpha-1-acid glycoprotein.

Lidocaine crosses the blood-brain and placental barriers, presumably by passive diffusion.

Lidocaine is metabolized rapidly by the liver, and metabolites and unchanged drug are excreted by the kidneys. Biotransformation includes oxidative N-dealkylation, ring hydroxylation, cleavage of the amide linkage, and conjugation. N-dealkylation, a major pathway of biotransformation, yields the metabolites monoethylglycinexylidide and glycinexylidide. The pharmacological/toxicological actions of these metabolites are similar to, but less potent than, those of lidocaine. Approximately 90% of lidocaine administered is excreted in the form of various metabolites, and less than 10% is excreted unchanged. The primary metabolite in urine is a conjugate of 4-hydroxy-2, 6-dimethylaniline.

The elimination half-life of lidocaine following an intravenous bolus injection is typically 1.5 to 2.0 hours. Because of the rapid rate at which lidocaine is metabolized, any condition that affects liver function may alter lidocaine kinetics. The half-life may be prolonged two-fold or more in patients with liver dysfunction. Renal dysfunction does not affect lidocaine kinetics but may increase the accumulation of metabolites.

Factors such as acidosis and the use of CNS stimulants and depressants affect the CNS levels of lidocaine required to produce overt systemic effects. Objective adverse manifestations become increasingly apparent with increasing venous plasma levels above 6.0 µg free base per mL. In the rhesus monkey arterial blood levels of 18-21 µg/mL have been shown to be threshold for convulsive activity.

Indications and Usage for Clin-Lido

Lidocaine Hydrochloride and Epinephrine Injection, USP is indicated for production of local or regional anesthesia by infiltration techniques such as percutaneous injection, by peripheral nerve block techniques such as brachial plexus and intercostal and by central neural techniques such as lumbar and caudal epidural blocks, when the accepted procedures for these techniques as described in standard textbooks are observed.

Contraindications

Lidocaine is contraindicated in patients with a known history of hypersensitivity to local anesthetics of the amide type.

Warnings

LIDOCAINE HYDROCHLORIDE AND EPINEPHRINE INJECTION, USP FOR INFILTRATION AND NERVE BLOCK SHOULD BE EMPLOYED ONLY BY CLINICIANS WHO ARE WELL VERSED IN DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF DOSE-RELATED TOXICITY AND OTHER ACUTE EMERGENCIES THAT MIGHT ARISE FROM THE BLOCK TO BE EMPLOYED AND THEN ONLY AFTER ENSURING THE IMMEDIATE AVAILABILITY OF OXYGEN, OTHER RESUSCITATIVE DRUGS, CARDIOPULMONARY EQUIPMENT, AND THE PERSONNEL NEEDED FOR PROPER MANAGEMENT OF TOXIC REACTIONS AND RELATED EMERGENCIES (See also ADVERSE REACTIONS and PRECAUTIONS). DELAY IN PROPER MANAGEMENT OF DOSE-RELATED TOXICITY, UNDERVENTILATION FROM ANY CAUSE AND/OR ALTERED SENSITIVITY MAY LEAD TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF ACIDOSIS, CARDIAC ARREST AND, POSSIBLY, DEATH.

Intra-articular infusions of local anesthetics following arthroscopic and other surgical procedures is an unapproved use, and there have been post-marketing reports of chondrolysis in patients receiving such infusions. The majority of reported cases of chondrolysis have involved the shoulder joint; cases of gleno-humeral chondrolysis have been described in pediatric and adult patients following intra-articular infusions of local anesthetics with and without epinephrine for periods of 48 to 72 hours. There is insufficient information to determine whether shorter infusion periods are not associated with these findings. The time of onset of symptoms, such as joint pain, stiffness and loss of motion can be variable, but may begin as early as the 2nd month after surgery. Currently, there is no effective treatment for chondrolysis; patients who experienced chondrolysis have required additional diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and some required arthroplasty or shoulder replacement.

To avoid intravascular injection, aspiration should be performed before the local anesthetic solution is injected. The needle must be repositioned until no return of blood can be elicited by aspiration. Note, however, that the absence of blood in the syringe does not guarantee that intravascular injection has been avoided.

Local anesthetic solutions containing antimicrobial preservatives (e.g., methylparaben) should not be used for epidural or spinal anesthesia because the safety of these agents has not been established with regard to intrathecal injection, either intentional or accidental.

Lidocaine Hydrochloride and Epinephrine Injection contains sodium metabisulfite, a sulfite that may cause allergic-type reactions including anaphylactic symptoms and life-threatening or less severe asthmatic episodes in certain susceptible people. The overall prevalence of sulfite sensitivity in the general population is unknown and probably low. Sulfite sensitivity is seen more frequently in asthmatic than in nonasthmatic people.

Precautions

General: The safety and effectiveness of lidocaine depend on proper dosage, correct technique, adequate precautions, and readiness for emergencies. Standard textbooks should be consulted for specific techniques and precautions for various regional anesthetic procedures.

Resuscitative equipment, oxygen, and other resuscitative drugs should be available for immediate use. (See WARNINGS and ADVERSE REACTIONS). The lowest dosage that results in effective anesthesia should be used to avoid high plasma levels and serious adverse effects. Syringe aspirations should also be performed before and during each supplemental injection when using indwelling catheter techniques. During the administration of epidural anesthesia, it is recommended that a test dose be administered initially and that the patient be monitored for central nervous system toxicity and cardiovascular toxicity, as well as for signs of unintended intrathecal administration before proceeding. When clinical conditions permit, consideration should be given to employing local anesthetic solutions that contain epinephrine for the test dose because circulatory changes compatible with epinephrine may also serve as a warning sign of unintended intravascular injection. An intravascular injection is still possible even if aspirations for blood are negative. Repeated doses of lidocaine may cause significant increases in blood levels with each repeated dose because of slow accumulation of the drug or its metabolites. Tolerance to elevated blood levels varies with the status of the patient. Debilitated, elderly patients, acutely ill patients and children should be given reduced doses commensurate with their age and physical condition. Lidocaine should also be used with caution in patients with severe shock or heart block.

Lumbar and caudal epidural anesthesia should be used with extreme caution in persons with the following conditions: existing neurological disease, spinal deformities, septicemia and severe hypertension.

Local anesthetic solutions containing a vasoconstrictor should be used cautiously and in carefully circumscribed quantities in areas of the body supplied by end arteries or having otherwise compromised blood supply. Patients with peripheral vascular disease and those with hypertensive vascular disease may exhibit exaggerated vasoconstrictor response. Ischemic injury or necrosis may result. Preparations containing a vasoconstrictor should be used with caution in patients during or following the administration of potent general anesthetic agents, since cardiac arrhythmias may occur under such conditions.

Careful and constant monitoring of cardiovascular and respiratory (adequacy of ventilation) vital signs and the patient’s state of consciousness should be accomplished after each local anesthetic injection. It should be kept in mind at such times that restlessness, anxiety, tinnitus, dizziness, blurred vision, tremors, depression or drowsiness may be early warning signs of central nervous system toxicity.

Since amide-type local anesthetics are metabolized by the liver, lidocaine injection should be used with caution in patients with hepatic disease. Patients with severe hepatic disease because of their inability to metabolize local anesthetics normally, are a greater risk of developing toxic plasma concentrations. Lidocaine should also be used with caution in patients with impaired cardiovascular function since they may be less able to compensate for functional changes associated with the prolongation of A-V conduction produced by these drugs.

Many drugs used during the conduct of anesthesia are considered potential triggering agents for familial malignant hyperthermia. Since it is not known whether amide-type local anesthetics may trigger this reaction and since the need for supplemental general anesthesia cannot be predicted in advance, it is suggested that a standard protocol for the management of malignant hyperthermia should be available. Early unexplained signs of tachycardia, tachypnea, labile blood pressure and metabolic acidosis may precede temperature elevation. Successful outcome is dependent on early diagnosis, prompt discontinuance of the suspect triggering agent(s) and institution of treatment, including oxygen therapy, indicated supportive measures and dantrolene (consult dantrolene sodium intravenous package insert before using).

Injections containing epinephrine or other vasoconstrictors should not be used for intravenous regional anesthesia.

Lidocaine should be used with caution in persons with known drug sensitivities. Patients allergic to para-amino-benzoic acid derivatives (procaine, tetracaine, benzocaine, etc.) have not shown cross sensitivity to lidocaine.

Use in the Head and Neck Area: Small doses of local anesthetics injected into the head and neck area, including retrobulbar, dental and stellate ganglion blocks, may produce adverse reactions similar to systemic toxicity seen with unintentional intravascular injections of larger doses. Confusion, convulsions, respiratory depression and/or respiratory arrest and cardiovascular stimulation or depression have been reported. These reactions may be due to intra-arterial injections of the local anesthetic with retrograde flow to the cerebral circulation. Patients receiving these blocks should have their circulation and respiration monitored and be constantly observed. Resuscitative equipment and personnel for treating adverse reactions should be immediately available. Dosage recommendations should not be exceeded. (See DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION).

Information for Patients: When appropriate, patients should be informed in advance that they may experience temporary loss of sensation and motor activity, usually in the lower half of the body following proper administration of epidural anesthesia.

Clinically Significant Drug Interactions: The administration of local anesthetic solutions containing epinephrine or norepinephrine to patients receiving monoamine oxidase inhibitors or tricyclic antidepressants may produce severe prolonged hypertension.

Phenothiazines and butyrophenones may reduce or reverse the pressor effect of epinephrine.

Concurrent use of these agents should generally be avoided. In situations when concurrent therapy is necessary, careful patient monitoring is essential.

Concurrent administration of vasopressor drugs (for the treatment of hypotension related to obstetric blocks) and ergot-type oxytocic drugs may cause severe persistent hypertension or cerebrovascular accidents.

Drug Laboratory Test Interactions: The intramuscular injection of lidocaine may result in an increase in creatine phosphokinase levels. Thus, the use of this enzyme determination without isoenzyme separation as a diagnostic test for the presence of acute myocardial infarction may be compromised by the intramuscular injection of lidocaine.

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility: Studies of lidocaine in animals to evaluate the carcinogenic and mutagenic potential or the effect on fertility have not been conducted.

Pregnancy: Teratogenic Effects. Pregnancy Category B. Reproduction studies have been performed in rats at doses up to 6.6 times the human dose and have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus caused by lidocaine. There are, however, no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. Animal reproduction studies are not always predictive of human response. General consideration should be given to this fact before administering lidocaine to women of childbearing potential, especially during early pregnancy when maximum organogenesis takes place.

Labor and Delivery: Local anesthetics rapidly cross the placenta and when used for epidural, paracervical, pudendal or caudal block anesthesia, can cause varying degrees of maternal, fetal and neonatal toxicity (See CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY-Pharmacokinetics). The potential for toxicity depends upon the procedure performed, the type and amount of drug used, and the technique of drug administration. Adverse reactions in the parturient, fetus and neonate involve alterations of the central nervous system peripheral vascular tone and cardiac function.

Maternal hypotension has resulted from regional anesthesia. Local anesthetics produce vasodilation by blocking sympathetic nerves. Elevating the patient’s legs and positioning her on her left side will help prevent decreases in blood pressure. The fetal heart rate also should be monitored continuously, and electronic fetal monitoring is highly advisable.

Epidural, spinal, paracervical, or pudendal anesthesia may alter the forces of parturition through changes in uterine contractility or maternal expulsive efforts. In one study, paracervical block anesthesia was associated with a decrease in the mean duration of first stage labor and facilitation of cervical dilation. However, spinal and epidural anesthesia have also been reported to prolong the second stage of labor by removing the parturient’s reflex urge to bear down or by interfering with motor function. The use of obstetrical anesthesia may increase the need for forceps assistance.

The use of some local anesthetic drug products during labor and delivery may be followed by diminished muscle strength and tone for the first day or two of life. The long term significance of these observations is unknown. Fetal bradycardia may occur in 20 to 30 percent of patients receiving paracervical nerve block anesthesia with the amide-type local anesthetics and may be associated with fetal acidosis. Fetal heart rate should always be monitored during paracervical anesthesia. The physician should weigh the possible advantages against risks when considering paracervical block in prematurity, toxemia of pregnancy and fetal distress. Careful adherence to recommended dosage is of the utmost importance in obstetrical paracervical block. Failure to achieve adequate analgesia with recommended doses should arouse suspicion of intravascular or fetal intracranial injection. Cases compatible with unintended fetal intracranial injection of local anesthetic solution have been reported following intended paracervical or pudendal block or both. Babies so affected present with unexplained neonatal depression at birth, which correlates with high local anesthetic serum levels, and often manifest seizures within six hours. Prompt use of supportive measures combined with forced urinary excretion of the local anesthetic has been used successfully to manage this complication.

Case reports of maternal convulsions and cardiovascular collapse following use of some local anesthetics for paracervical block in early pregnancy (as anesthesia for elective abortion) suggest that systemic absorption under these circumstances may be rapid. The recommended maximum dose of each drug should not be exceeded. Injection should be made slowly and with frequent aspiration. Allow a 5-minute interval between sides.

Nursing Mothers: It is not known whether this drug is excreted in human milk. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk, caution should be exercised when lidocaine is administered to a nursing woman.

Pediatric Use: Dosages in pediatric patients should be reduced, commensurate with age, body weight and physical condition. See DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION.

Adverse Reactions

Systemic: Adverse experiences following the administration of lidocaine are similar in nature to those observed with other amide local anesthetic agents. These adverse experiences are, in general, dose-related and may result from high plasma levels caused by excessive dosage, rapid absorption or inadvertent intravascular injection, or may result from a hypersensitivity, idiosyncrasy or diminished tolerance on the part of the patient. Serious adverse experiences are generally systemic in nature. The following types are those most commonly reported:

Central Nervous System: CNS manifestations are excitatory and/or depressant and may be characterized by lightheadedness, nervousness, apprehension, euphoria, confusion, dizziness, drowsiness, tinnitus, blurred or double vision, vomiting, sensations of heat, cold or numbness, twitching, tremors, convulsions, unconsciousness, respiratory depression and arrest. The excitatory manifestations may be very brief or may not occur at all, in which case the first manifestation of toxicity may be drowsiness merging into unconsciousness and respiratory arrest.

Drowsiness following the administration of lidocaine is usually an early sign of a high blood level of the drug and may occur as a consequence of rapid absorption.

Cardiovascular System: Cardiovascular manifestations are usually depressant and are characterized by bradycardia, hypotension, and cardiovascular collapse, which may lead to cardiac arrest.

Allergic: Allergic reactions are characterized by cutaneous lesions, urticaria, edema or anaphylactoid reactions. Allergic reactions may occur as a result of sensitivity either to local anesthetic agents, to bisulfites or to the methylparaben used as a preservative in multiple dose vials. Allergic reactions as a result of sensitivity to lidocaine are extremely rare and, if they occur, should be managed by conventional means. The detection of sensitivity by skin testing is of doubtful value.

Neurologic: The incidences of adverse reactions associated with the use of local anesthetics may be related to the total dose of local anesthetic administered and are also dependent upon the particular drug used, the route of administration and the physical status of the patient. In a prospective review of 10,440 patients who received lidocaine for spinal anesthesia, the incidences of adverse reactions were reported to be about 3 percent each for positional headaches, hypotension and backache; 2 percent for shivering; and less than 1 percent each for peripheral nerve symptoms, nausea, respiratory inadequacy and double vision. Many of these observations may be related to local anesthetic techniques, with or without a contribution from the local anesthetic.

In the practice of caudal or lumbar epidural block, occasional unintentional penetration of the subarachnoid space by the catheter may occur. Subsequent adverse effects may depend partially on the amount of drug administered subdurally. These may include spinal block of varying magnitude (including total spinal block), hypotension secondary to spinal block, loss of bladder and bowel control, and loss of perineal sensation and sexual function. Persistent motor, sensory and/or autonomic (sphincter control) deficit of some lower spinal segments with slow recovery (several months) or incomplete recovery have been reported in rare instances when caudal or lumbar epidural block has been attempted. Backache and headache have also been noted following use of these anesthetic procedures.

There have been reported cases of permanent injury to extraocular muscles requiring surgical repair following retrobulbar administration.

Overdosage


Acute emergencies from local anesthetics are generally related to high plasma levels encountered during therapeutic use of local anesthetics or to unintended subarachnoid injection of local anesthetic solution (see ADVERSE REACTIONS, WARNINGS and PRECAUTIONS).

Management of Local Anesthetic Emergencies: The first consideration is prevention, best accomplished by careful monitoring of cardiovascular and respiratory vital signs and the patient’s state of consciousness after each local anesthetic injection. At the first sign of change, oxygen should be administered.

The first step in the management of convulsions, as well as under-ventilation or apnea due to unintended subarachnoid injection of drug solution, consists of immediate attention to the maintenance of a patent airway and assisted or controlled ventilation with oxygen and a delivery system capable of permitting immediate positive airway pressure by mask. Immediately after the institution of these ventilatory measures, the adequacy of the circulation should be evaluated, keeping in mind that drugs used to treat convulsions sometimes depress the circulation when administered intravenously. Should convulsions persist despite adequate respiratory support, and if the status of the circulation permits, small increments of an ultra-short acting barbiturate (such as thiopental or thiamylal) or a benzodiazepine (such as diazepam) may be administered intravenously. The clinician should be familiar, prior to use of local anesthetics, with these anticonvulsant drugs. Supportive treatment of circulatory depression may require administration of intravenous fluids and, when appropriate, a vasopressor as directed by the clinical situation (e.g., ephedrine).

If not treated immediately, both convulsions and cardiovascular depression can result in hypoxia, acidosis, bradycardia, arrhythmias and cardiac arrest. Underventilation or apnea due to unintentional subarachnoid injection of local anesthetic solution may produce these same signs and also lead to cardiac arrest if ventilatory support is not instituted. If cardiac arrest should occur standard cardiopulmonary resuscitative measures should be instituted.

Endotracheal intubation, employing drugs and techniques familiar to the clinician, may be indicated, after initial administration of oxygen by mask, if difficulty is encountered in the maintenance of a patent airway or if prolonged ventilatory support (assisted or controlled) is indicated.

Dialysis is of negligible value in the treatment of acute overdosage with lidocaine.

The oral LD 50 of lidocaine HCl in non-fasted female rats is 459 (346-773) mg/kg (as the salt) and 214 (159-324) mg/kg (as the salt) in fasted female rats.

Clin-Lido Dosage and Administration


Table I (Recommended Dosages) summarizes the recommended volumes and concentrations of Lidocaine Hydrochloride Injection, USP for various types of anesthetic procedures. The dosages suggested in this table are for normal healthy adults and refer to the use of epinephrine-free solutions. When larger volumes are required only solutions containing epinephrine should be used, except in those cases where vasopressor drugs may be contraindicated.

There have been adverse event reports of chondrolysis in patients receiving intra-articular infusions of local anesthetics following arthroscopic and other surgical procedures. Lidocaine is not approved for this use (see WARNINGS and DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION).

These recommended doses serve only as a guide to the amount of anesthetic required for most routine procedures. The actual volumes and concentrations to be used depend on a number of factors such as type and extent of surgical procedure, depth of anesthesia and degree of muscular relaxation required, duration of anesthesia required, and the physical condition of the patient. In all cases the lowest concentration and smallest dose that will produce the desired result should be given. Dosages should be reduced for children and for elderly and debilitated patients and patients with cardiac and/or liver disease.

The onset of anesthesia, the duration of anesthesia and the degree of muscular relaxation are proportional to the volume and concentration (i.e., total dose) of local anesthetic used. Thus, an increase in volume and concentration of Lidocaine Hydrochloride Injection, USP will decrease the onset of anesthesia, prolong the duration of anesthesia, provide a greater degree of muscular relaxation and increase the segmental spread of anesthesia. However, increasing the volume and concentration of Lidocaine Hydrochloride Injection, USP may result in a more profound fall in blood pressure when used in epidural anesthesia. Although the incidence of side effects with lidocaine is quite low, caution should be exercised when employing large volumes and concentrations, since the incidence of side effects is directly proportional to the total dose of local anesthetic agent injected.

Epidural Anesthesia

For an epidural test dose, only the following available specific product of Lidocaine Hydrochloride and Epinephrine Injection, USP by Hospira is recommended:

1.5% with epinephrine 1:200,000.................... 5 mL single-dose ampuls

For epidural anesthesia, only the following available specific products of Lidocaine Hydrochloride and Epinephrine Injection, USP by Hospira are recommended:

1% with epinephrine 1:200,000............................ 30 mL single-dose ampuls

30 mL single-dose vials

1.5% with epinephrine 1:200,000.......................... 30 mL single-dose ampuls

30 mL single-dose vials

2% with epinephrine 1:200,000................................ 20 mL single-dose vials

Although these solutions are intended specifically for epidural anesthesia, they may also be used for infiltration and peripheral nerve block provided they are employed as single-dose units. These solutions contain no bacteriostatic agent.

In epidural anesthesia, the dosage varies with the number of dermatomes to be anesthetized (generally 2-3 mL of the indicated concentration per dermatome).

Caudal and Lumbar Epidural Block: As a precaution against the adverse experiences sometimes observed following unintentional penetration of the subarachnoid space, a test dose such as 2-3 mL of 1.5% lidocaine injection should be administered at least 5 minutes prior to injecting the total volume required for a lumbar or caudal epidural block. The test dose should be repeated if the patient is moved in a manner that may have displaced the catheter. Epinephrine, if contained in the test dose (10-15 µg have been suggested), may serve as a warning of unintentional intravascular injection. If injected into a blood vessel, this amount of epinephrine is likely to produce a transient “epinephrine response” within 45 seconds, consisting of an increase in heart rate and systolic blood pressure, circumoral pallor, palpitations and nervousness in the unsedated patient. The sedated patient may exhibit only a pulse rate increase of 20 or more beats per minute for 15 or more seconds. Patients on beta-blockers may not manifest changes in heart rate, but blood pressure monitoring can detect an evanescent rise in systolic blood pressure. Adequate time should be allowed for onset of anesthesia after administration of each test dose. The rapid injection of a large volume of Lidocaine Hydrochloride and Epinephrine Injection, USP through the catheter should be avoided, and, when feasible, fractional doses should be administered.

In the event of the known injection of a large volume of local anesthetic solution into the subarachnoid space, after suitable resuscitation and if the catheter is in place, consider attempting the recovery of drug by draining a moderate amount of cerebrospinal fluid (such as 10 mL) through the epidural catheter.

Maximum Recommended Dosages

Adults: For normal healthy adults, the individual maximum dose of Lidocaine Hydrochloride and Epinephrine Injection, USP should not exceed 7 mg/kg (3.5 mg/lb) of body weight and in general it is recommended that the maximum total dose not exceed 500 mg. When used without epinephrine, the maximum individual dose should not exceed 4.5 mg/kg (2 mg per lb) of body weight, and in general it is recommended that the maximum total dose does not exceed 300 mg. For continuous epidural or caudal anesthesia, the maximum recommended dosage should not be administered at intervals of less than 90 minutes. When continuous lumbar or caudal epidural anesthesia is used for non-obstetrical procedures, more drug may be administered if required to produce adequate anesthesia.

The maximum recommended dose per 90 minute period of lidocaine hydrochloride for paracervical block in obstetrical patients and non-obstetrical patients is 200 mg total. One half of the total dose is usually administered to each side. Inject slowly five minutes between sides. (See also discussion of paracervical block in PRECAUTIONS).

Pediatric Population: It is difficult to recommend a maximum dose of any drug for pediatric patients, since this varies as a function of age and weight. For pediatric patients over 3 years of age who have a normal lean body mass and normal body development, the maximum dose is determined by the child’s age and weight. For example, in a child of 5 years weighing 50 lbs., the dose of lidocaine HCl should not exceed 75-100 mg (1.5-2 mg/lb).

In order to guard against systemic toxicity, the lowest effective concentration and lowest effective dose should be used at all times. In some cases it will be necessary to dilute available concentrations with 0.9% sodium chloride injection in order to obtain the required final concentration.

FOR EPIDURAL USE ONLY.

Note: Parenteral drug products should be inspected visually for particulate matter and discoloration prior to administration whenever the solution and container permit. Do not use the injection if its color is pinkish or darker than slightly yellow or if it contains a precipitate.

Table I Recommended Dosages of Lidocaine Hydrochloride Injection, USP for Various Anesthetic Procedures in Normal Healthy Adults

Lidocaine Hydrochloride Injection, USP (without Epinephrine)

Procedure

Conc. (%)

Vol. (mL)

Total Dose (mg)

Infiltration
Percutaneous
Intravenous Regional

0.5 or 1.0

0.5


1-60

10-60


5-300

50-300

Peripheral Nerve Blocks, e.g.

Brachial

Dental

Intercostal

Paravertebral

Pudendal (each side)

Paracervical Obstetrical Analgesia (each side)

1.5

2.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

15-20

1-5

3

3-5

10

10

225-300

20-100

30

30-50

100

100

Sympathetic Nerve Blocks, e.g.

Cervical (stellate ganglion)

Lumbar

1.0

1.0

5

5-10

50

50-100

Central Neural Blocks

Epidural*

Thoracic

Lumbar

Analgesia

Anesthesia


Caudal

Obstetrical Analgesia

Surgical Anesthesia


1.0


1.0

1.5

2.0


1.0

1.5

20-30


25-30

15-20

10-15


20-30

15-20

200-300


250-300

225-300

200-300


200-300

225-300

*Dose determined by number of dermatomes to be anesthetized (2 to 3 mL/ dermatome).


THE ABOVE SUGGESTED CONCENTRATIONS AND VOLUMES SERVE ONLY AS A GUIDE. OTHER VOLUMES AND CONCENTRATIONS MAY BE USED PROVIDED THE TOTAL MAXIMUM RECOMMENDED DOSE IS NOT EXCEEDED.

Sterilization, Storage and Technical Procedures: Disinfecting agents containing heavy metals, which cause release of respective ions (mercury, zinc, copper, etc.) should not be used for skin or mucous membrane disinfection as they have been related to incidence of swelling and edema. When chemical disinfection of multi-dose vials is desired, either isopropyl alcohol (91%) or 70% ethyl alcohol is recommended. Many commercially available brands of rubbing alcohol, as well as solutions of ethyl alcohol not of USP grade, contain denaturants which are injurious to rubber and, therefore, are not to be used. It is recommended that chemical disinfection be accomplished by wiping the vial stopper or ampul thoroughly with cotton or gauze that has been moistened with the recommended alcohol just prior to use.

Do not autoclave.


How is Clin-Lido Supplied


Lidocaine Hydrochloride and Epinephrine Injection, USP is supplied in single-dose and multiple-dose containers as shown below:

NDC No.

Container

Size

Drug Concentration

Lidocaine HCl

Epinephrine

   

Single-dose

0409-3181-01

Fliptop Vial

30 mL

1.5%

1:200,000

0409-3183-01

Fliptop Vial

20 mL

2%

1:200,000

Epidural Test Dose (single-dose)

0409-1209-01

Ampul

5 mL

1.5%

1:200,000

0409-1209-05

Ampul

5 mL

1.5%

1:200,000

0409-1209-65

Ampul

5 mL

1.5%

1:200,000

Multiple-dose

0409-3177-01

Fliptop Vial

50 mL

0.5%

1:200,000

0409-3178-01

Fliptop Vial

20 mL

1%

1:100,000

0409-3178-02

Fliptop Vial

30 mL

1%

1:100,000

0409-3178-03

Fliptop Vial

50 mL

1%

1:100,000

0409-3182-01

Fliptop Vial

20 mL

2%

1:100,000

0409-3182-02

Fliptop Vial

30 mL

2%

1:100,000

0409-3182-03

Fliptop Vial

50 mL

2%

1:100,000


Store at 20 to 25°C (68 to 77°F). [See USP Controlled Room Temperature.] Protect from light.

Revised: March, 2010

Printed in USA EN-2440

Hospira, Inc., Lake Forest, IL 60045 USA


RL-0829

-------------------- SODIUM BICARBONATE --------------------

FOR CORRECTION OF METABOLIC ACIDOSIS AND
OTHER CONDITIONS REQUIRING SYSTEMIC ALKALINIZATION.

Fliptop Vial

Rx only

Clin-Lido Description

Sodium Bicarbonate Injection, USP is a sterile, nonpyrogenic, hypertonic solution of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO 3) in water for injection for administration by the intravenous route as an electrolyte replenisher and systemic alkalizer.

The solution is offered in a concentration of 8.4%. See table in HOW SUPPLIED section for contents and characteristics.

The solution contains no bacteriostat, antimicrobial agent or added buffer and is intended only for use as a single-dose injection. When smaller doses are required, the unused portion should be discarded with the entire unit.

Sodium bicarbonate, 84 mg is equal to one milliequivalent each of Na + and HCO 3¯. Sodium Bicarbonate, USP is chemically designated NaHCO 3, a white crystalline powder soluble in water.

Water for Injection, USP is chemically designated H 2O.

Clin-Lido - Clinical Pharmacology

Intravenous sodium bicarbonate therapy increases plasma bicarbonate, buffers excess hydrogen ion concentration, raises blood pH and reverses the clinical manifestations of acidosis.

Sodium bicarbonate in water dissociates to provide sodium (Na +) and bicarbonate (HCO 3¯) ions. Sodium (Na +) is the principal cation of the extracellular fluid and plays a large part in the therapy of fluid and electrolyte disturbances. Bicarbonate (HCO 3¯) is a normal constituent of body fluids and the normal plasma level ranges from 24 to 31 mEq/liter. Plasma concentration is regulated by the kidney through acidification of the urine when there is a deficit or by alkalinization of the urine when there is an excess. Bicarbonate anion is considered “labile” since at a proper concentration of hydrogen ion (H +) it may be converted to carbonic acid (H 2CO 3) and thence to its volatile form, carbon dioxide (CO 2) excreted by the lung. Normally a ratio of 1:20 (carbonic acid: bicarbonate) is present in the extracellular fluid. In a healthy adult with normal kidney function, practically all the glomerular filtered bicarbonate ion is reabsorbed; less than 1% is excreted in the urine.

Indications and Usage for Clin-Lido

Sodium Bicarbonate Injection, USP is indicated in the treatment of metabolic acidosis which may occur in severe renal disease, uncontrolled diabetes, circulatory insufficiency due to shock or severe dehydration, extracorporeal circulation of blood, cardiac arrest and severe primary lactic acidosis. Sodium bicarbonate is further indicated in the treatment of certain drug intoxications, including barbiturates (where dissociation of the barbiturate-protein complex is desired), in poisoning by salicylates or methyl alcohol and in hemolytic reactions requiring alkalinization of the urine to diminish nephrotoxicity of blood pigments. Sodium bicarbonate also is indicated in severe diarrhea which is often accompanied by a significant loss of bicarbonate.

Treatment of metabolic acidosis should, if possible, be superimposed on measures designed to control the basic cause of the acidosis – e.g., insulin in uncomplicated diabetes, blood volume restoration in shock. But since an appreciable time interval may elapse before all of the ancillary effects are brought about, bicarbonate therapy is indicated to minimize risks inherent to the acidosis itself.

Vigorous bicarbonate therapy is required in any form of metabolic acidosis where a rapid increase in plasma total CO 2 content is crucial – e.g., cardiac arrest, circulatory insufficiency due to shock or severe dehydration, and in severe primary lactic acidosis or severe diabetic acidosis.

Contraindications

Sodium Bicarbonate Injection, USP is contraindicated in patients who are losing chloride by vomiting or from continuous gastrointestinal suction, and in patients receiving diuretics known to produce a hypochloremic alkalosis.

Warnings

Solutions containing sodium ions should be used with great care, if at all, in patients with congestive heart failure, severe renal insufficiency and in clinical states in which there exists edema with sodium retention.

In patients with diminished renal function, administration of solutions containing sodium ions may result in sodium retention.

The intravenous administration of these solutions can cause fluid and/or solute overloading resulting in dilution of serum electrolyte concentrations, overhydration, congested states or pulmonary edema.

Extravascular infiltration should be avoided, see ADVERSE REACTIONS.

Precautions

The potentially large loads of sodium given with bicarbonate require that caution be exercised in the use of sodium bicarbonate in patients with congestive heart failure or other edematous or sodium-retaining states, as well as in patients with oliguria or anuria. See table in HOW SUPPLIED section for amount of sodium present in the solution.

Caution must be exercised in the administration of parenteral fluids, especially those containing sodium ions, to patients receiving corticosteroids or corticotropin.

Potassium depletion may predispose to metabolic alkalosis and coexistent hypocalcemia may be associated with carpopedal spasm as the plasma pH rises. These dangers can be minimized if such electrolyte imbalances are appropriately treated prior to or concomitantly with bicarbonate infusion.

Rapid injection (10 mL/min) of hypertonic Sodium Bicarbonate Injection, USP, solutions into neonates and children under two years of age may produce hypernatremia, a decrease in cerebrospinal fluid pressure and possible intracranial hemorrhage. The rate of administration in such patients should therefore be limited to no more than 8 mEq/kg/day. A 4.2% solution may be preferred for such slow administration. In emergencies such as cardiac arrest, the risk of rapid infusion must be weighed against the potential for fatality due to acidosis.

Drug Interactions

Additives may be incompatible; norepinephrine and dobutamine are incompatible with sodium bicarbonate solution.

The addition of sodium bicarbonate to parenteral solutions containing calcium should be avoided, except where compatibility has been previously established. Precipitation or haze may result from sodium bicarbonate-calcium admixtures. NOTE: Do not use the injection if it contains precipitate.

Additives may be incompatible. Consult with pharmacist, if available. When introducing additives, use aseptic technique, mix thoroughly and do not store.

Laboratory Tests

The aim of all bicarbonate therapy is to produce a substantial correction of the low total CO 2 content and blood pH, but the risks of overdosage and alkalosis should be avoided. Hence, repeated fractional doses and periodic monitoring by appropriate laboratory tests are recommended to minimize the possibility of overdosage.

Pregnancy Category C. Animal reproduction studies have not been conducted with sodium bicarbonate. It is also not known whether sodium bicarbonate can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman or can affect reproduction capacity. Sodium bicarbonate should be given to a pregnant woman only if clearly needed.

Adverse Reactions

Overly aggressive therapy with Sodium Bicarbonate Injection, USP can result in metabolic alkalosis (associated with muscular twitchings, irritability and tetany) and hypernatremia.

Inadvertent extravasation of intravenously administered hypertonic solutions of sodium bicarbonate have been reported to cause chemical cellulitis because of their alkalinity, with tissue necrosis, ulceration or sloughing at the site of infiltration. Prompt elevation of the part, warmth and local injection of lidocaine or hyaluronidase are recommended to prevent sloughing of extravasated I.V. infusions.

Overdosage

Should alkalosis result, the bicarbonate should be stopped and the patient managed according to the degree of alkalosis present. 0.9% sodium chloride injection intravenous may be given; potassium chloride also may be indicated if there is hypokalemia. Severe alkalosis may be accompanied by hyperirritability or tetany and these symptoms may be controlled by calcium gluconate. An acidifying agent such as ammonium chloride may also be indicated in severe alkalosis. See WARNINGS and PRECAUTIONS.

Clin-Lido Dosage and Administration

Sodium Bicarbonate Injection, USP is administered by the intravenous route.

In cardiac arrest, a rapid intravenous dose of 44.6 to 100 mEq may be given initially and continued at a rate of 44.6 to 50 mEq every 5 to 10 minutes if necessary (as indicated by arterial pH and blood gas monitoring) to reverse the acidosis. Caution should be observed in emergencies where very rapid infusion of large quantities of bicarbonate is indicated. Bicarbonate solutions are hypertonic and may produce an undesirable rise in plasma sodium concentration in the process of correcting the metabolic acidosis. In cardiac arrest, however, the risks from acidosis exceed those of hypernatremia.

In infants (up to two years of age), the 4.2% solution is recommended for intravenous administration at a dose not to exceed 8 mEq/kg/day. Slow administration rates and the 4.2% solution are recommended in neonates, to guard against the possibility of producing hypernatremia, decreasing cerebrospinal fluid pressure and inducing intracranial hemorrhage.

In less urgent forms of metabolic acidosis, Sodium Bicarbonate Injection, USP may be added to other intravenous fluids. The amount of bicarbonate to be given to older children and adults over a four-to-eight-hour period is approximately 2 to 5 mEq/kg of body weight – depending upon the severity of the acidosis as judged by the lowering of total CO 2 content, blood pH and clinical condition of the patient. In metabolic acidosis associated with shock, therapy should be monitored by measuring blood gases, plasma osmolarity, arterial blood lactate, hemodynamics and cardiac rhythm. Bicarbonate therapy should always be planned in a stepwise fashion since the degree of response from a given dose is not precisely predictable. Initially an infusion of 2 to 5 mEq/kg body weight over a period of 4 to 8 hours will produce a measurable improvement in the abnormal acid-base status of the blood. The next step of therapy is dependent upon the clinical response of the patient. If severe symptoms have abated, then the frequency of administration and the size of the dose may be reduced.

In general, it is unwise to attempt full correction of a low total CO 2 content during the first 24 hours of therapy, since this may be accompanied by an unrecognized alkalosis because of a delay in the readjustment of ventilation to normal. Owing to this lag, the achievement of total CO 2 content of about 20 mEq/liter at the end of the first day of therapy will usually be associated with a normal blood pH. Further modification of the acidosis to completely normal values usually occurs in the presence of normal kidney function when and if the cause of the acidosis can be controlled. Values for total CO 2 which are brought to normal or above normal within the first day of therapy are very likely to be associated with grossly alkaline values for blood pH, with ensuing undesired side effects.

Parenteral drug products should be inspected visually for particulate matter and discoloration prior to administration, whenever solution and container permit. See PRECAUTIONS.

Do not use unless solution is clear and the container or seal is intact. Discard unused portion.

How is Clin-Lido Supplied

Sodium Bicarbonate Injection, USP is supplied in the following dosage form:

NDC No.

Dosage
Form

Conc.
%

mg/mL
(
NaHCO 3)

mEq/mL
(Na +)

mEq/mL
(HCO 3¯)

mEq/Container
size (mL)

mOsmol

pH

0409-6625-25

Fliptop Vial

8.4

84

1.0

1.0

50/50

2/mL

7.8 (7.0 to 8.5)

Store at 20 to 25°C (68 to 77°F). [See USP Controlled Room Temperature.]

Revised: 10/2012

EN-3065

Manufactured by Hospira, Inc., Lake Forest, IL 60045 USA

N+ and NOVAPLUS are registered trademarks of Novation, LLC.

IM-2221

Principal Display Panel – Kit Label

NDC 69101-714-01 Rx-Only

Clin-Lido Single Use Kit

Kit Contains:
1 Clindamycin Injection, USP 150 mg/ mL (2 mL)
1 Lidocaine HCL 1% and Epinephrine 1:100,000 Injection, USP (50 mL)
1 Sodium Bicarbonate Injection, USP 8.4% (50 mL)
6 Isopropyl Alcohol 70% Prep Pads
1 Pair Nitrile Powder Free Sterile Gloves (Size: Large)
1 Syringe (1 mL)
Sterile 4x4 Gauze

Distributed by:
Burke Therapeutics
Hot Springs, AR 71913

Clin-Lido-SINGLE USE KIT 
clindamycin, lidocaine hcl, and sodium bicarbonate kit
Product Information
Product Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG LABEL Item Code (Source) NDC:69101-714
Packaging
# Item Code Package Description
1 NDC:69101-714-01 1 KIT in 1 CARTON
Quantity of Parts
Part # Package Quantity Total Product Quantity
Part 1 1 VIAL, SINGLE-DOSE 2 mL
Part 2 1 VIAL, MULTI-DOSE 50 mL
Part 3 1 VIAL, MULTI-DOSE 50 mL
Part 1 of 3
CLINDAMYCIN 
clindamycin phosphate injection, solution
Product Information
Item Code (Source) NDC:0409-4050    
Route of Administration INTRAMUSCULAR, INTRAVENOUS DEA Schedule     
Active Ingredient/Active Moiety
Ingredient Name Basis of Strength Strength
CLINDAMYCIN PHOSPHATE (CLINDAMYCIN) CLINDAMYCIN 150 mg  in 1 mL
Inactive Ingredients
Ingredient Name Strength
EDETATE DISODIUM  
BENZYL ALCOHOL  
SODIUM HYDROXIDE  
HYDROCHLORIC ACID  
Packaging
# Item Code Package Description
1 NDC:0409-4050-01 2 mL in 1 VIAL, SINGLE-DOSE
Marketing Information
Marketing Category Application Number or Monograph Citation Marketing Start Date Marketing End Date
ANDA ANDA062800 07/24/1987
Part 2 of 3
LIDOCAINE HYDROCHLORIDE AND EPINEPHRINE 
lidocaine hydrochloride and epinephrine injection, solution
Product Information
Item Code (Source) NDC:0409-3178    
Route of Administration INFILTRATION DEA Schedule     
Active Ingredient/Active Moiety
Ingredient Name Basis of Strength Strength
LIDOCAINE HYDROCHLORIDE (LIDOCAINE) LIDOCAINE HYDROCHLORIDE ANHYDROUS 10 mg  in 1 mL
EPINEPHRINE (EPINEPHRINE) EPINEPHRINE 10 ug  in 1 mL
Inactive Ingredients
Ingredient Name Strength
SODIUM CHLORIDE 7 mg  in 1 mL
SODIUM METABISULFITE 0.5 mg  in 1 mL
ANHYDROUS CITRIC ACID 0.2 mg  in 1 mL
SODIUM HYDROXIDE  
HYDROCHLORIC ACID  
METHYLPARABEN  
WATER  
Packaging
# Item Code Package Description
1 NDC:0409-3178-03 50 mL in 1 VIAL, MULTI-DOSE
Marketing Information
Marketing Category Application Number or Monograph Citation Marketing Start Date Marketing End Date
ANDA ANDA089644 06/21/1988
Part 3 of 3
SODIUM BICARBONATE 
sodium bicarbonate injection, solution
Product Information
Item Code (Source) NDC:0409-6625    
Route of Administration INTRAVENOUS DEA Schedule     
Active Ingredient/Active Moiety
Ingredient Name Basis of Strength Strength
SODIUM BICARBONATE (SODIUM CATION and BICARBONATE ION) SODIUM BICARBONATE 84 mg  in 1 mL
Inactive Ingredients
Ingredient Name Strength
WATER  
Packaging
# Item Code Package Description
1 NDC:0409-6625-02 50 mL in 1 VIAL, MULTI-DOSE
Marketing Information
Marketing Category Application Number or Monograph Citation Marketing Start Date Marketing End Date
unapproved drug other 03/13/2014
Marketing Information
Marketing Category Application Number or Monograph Citation Marketing Start Date Marketing End Date
ANDA ANDA062800 06/18/2015
Labeler - Burke Therapeutics, LLC (079259903)
Revised: 07/2015
 
Burke Therapeutics, LLC
Hide