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Weekly Drug News Round Up - April 17, 2013

FDA Prohibits Generic Versions of OxyContin

The new OxyContin version is more difficult to tamper with and creates a thick gel that is difficult to inject or snort Read More...

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved new labeling for a reformulated version of OxyContin (oxycodone controlled-release) marketed in 2010 to deter drug abuse. Drug abusers could manipulate the original OxyContin controlled-release mechanism to allow rapid release of the narcotic. The dangerous quick release resulted in the potential for overdose and death. The original form of the OxyContin narcotic painkiller has now been withdrawn from the market. Generic versions of the original formulation of OxyContin will not be approved due to the high abuse potential and life-threatening adverse effects. OxyContin was the 14th best selling drug in 2012 with $2.7 billion in sales.

FDA Warning: DMAA is a Dangerous, Illegal Dietary Supplement

The stimulant dimethylamylamine (DMAA) may be particularly dangerous when used with caffeine Read More...

Dietary supplements that contain a stimulant called dimethylamylamine (DMAA) are dangerous and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued warning letters to companies that DMAA needs to be taken off the market or reformulated. DMAA, also known as 1,3-dimethylamylamine, methylhexanamine or geranium extract, is an ingredient found illegally in some dietary supplements and often touted as a “natural” stimulant. DMAA is promoted for weight loss, muscle-building and improvement of athletic performance. It can increase blood pressure and may lead to cardiovascular problems such as heart attack, shortness of breath and tightening of the chest. Consumers should check dietary supplement product labels for DMAA.

Topical Sitavig Approved for Cold Sores

Herpes labialis affects roughly 40 million people in the U.S. Read More...

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Sitavig (acyclovir) for treatment of herpes labialis (cold sores). Sitavig, by BioAlliance Pharma SA, is a mucoadhesive tablet that delivers a high concentration of topical antiviral acyclovir directly to the cold sore site. In a clinical study conducted in 775 patients, Sitavig was effective in terms of healing time with one single tablet containing 50 mg of acyclovir, and was well tolerated. Other products approved for topical treatment of cold sores include the prescription agents Zovirax (acyclovir) and Denavir (penciclovir) cream, and the nonprescription Abreva (docosanol) cream.

Drugs to Help Prevent Breast Cancer May Be Underutilized

Updated recommendations may help to spark renewed interest and conversations among providers and patients Read More...

Reflecting current clinical practice, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has issued a report and draft recommendation stating that the use of tamoxifen and raloxifene (Evista) can reduce the risk of breast cancer among high risk women. The recommendations state that doctors should talk with high-risk patients about the pros and cons of using these drugs to lower the risk of breast cancer, a strategy known as chemoprevention,. Both drugs are currently FDA-approved for chemoprevention -- tamoxifen for women 35 years and older, and raloxifene for postmenopausal women. However, the report also notes these preventive treatments are underutilized.

Drugs.com Receives Fourth Webby Nomination

Each year, The Webby People's Voice Awards gather millions of votes from the global Web community Read More...

We are extremely proud to announce that Drugs.com has been nominated for the prestigious Webby Awards. The Webby Awards is the leading international award honoring excellence on the Internet. This marks the fourth nomination in five years for the hard working team at Drugs.com! To yet again be judged among the Internet’s top 5 health web sites is indeed an honor. But we need your vote! The Webby People’s Voice Awards is also one of the few major awards that invite the public to participate by allowing you to vote for your favorite nominee. If you have found Drugs.com helpful, we’d really appreciate your vote here.