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VTE Risk Reduced With Partial Knee Replacement

TUESDAY, June 18, 2019 -- Patients undergoing partial knee replacement have a reduced risk for venous thromboembolism and opioid use in months 3 to 12 after surgery, according to a study presented at the European Congress of Rheumatology, the annual meeting of the European League Against Rheumatism, held from June 12 to 15 in Madrid.

Daniel Prieto-Alhambra, M.D., Ph.D., from the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom, and colleagues obtained data from four U.S. claims databases and one U.K. primary care electronic medical record database to examine the outcomes of partial versus total knee replacement (32,279 and 250,377 matched patients, respectively).

The researchers found that patients receiving partial knee replacement had a consistently lower short-term risk for venous thromboembolism, with calibrated hazard ratios ranging from 0.47 to 0.76. The risk for other complications did not differ between the groups. Patients receiving partial knee replacement had lower use of opioids in months 3 to 12 after surgery, with calibrated hazard ratios ranging from 0.70 to 0.86. The risk for five-year revision was higher for those undergoing partial versus total knee replacement (calibrated hazard ratios ranging from 1.51 to 2.16).

"Our study clearly demonstrates significant short-term advantages of partial knee replacement over total knee replacement and although the long-term risk of revision is higher for partial knee replacement, this is likely, at least partly, explained by a greater willingness to revise a partial knee replacement," a coauthor said in a statement.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

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Posted: June 2019

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