Skip to Content

May 2018 Briefing - Allergy

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Allergy for May 2018. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

ASHP: SVP, Injectable Opioid Shortages Threaten Patient Care

THURSDAY, May 31, 2018 -- The widespread shortages of injectable opioids and small-volume parenteral (SVP) solutions are jeopardizing patient care and placing a strain on hospital operations, according to a report published by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP).

More Information

Parents Have Concerns Over Food Allergy Precautions at Schools

WEDNESDAY, May 30, 2018 -- A substantial portion of parents whose children have food allergies have concerns over the safety of their child at school, according to a study published online May 12 in BMC Pediatrics.

Abstract/Full Text

Congress Approves Bill Expanding Private Care for VA Patients

THURSDAY, May 24, 2018 -- Patients served by the beleaguered Veterans Affairs health system may have wider access to private care, thanks to a bill approved Wednesday by the Senate. President Donald Trump is known to support the bill, which now awaits his signature.

AMA Statement
More Information

Global Variation in Personal Health Care Access and Quality

THURSDAY, May 24, 2018 -- There is considerable global variation in personal health care access and quality, according to a study published online May 23 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Vitamin D Supplement Tied to Less Wheezing in Black Preemies

WEDNESDAY, May 23, 2018 -- Vitamin D sustained supplementation is associated with reduced recurrent wheezing among black infants born preterm, according to a study published in the May 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

CDC: No Change in Level of Uninsured in U.S. in 2017

TUESDAY, May 22, 2018 -- Overall, 9.1 percent of individuals in the United States were uninsured in 2017, which was not significantly different from the level in 2016, according to a report published online May 22 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Centers for Health Statistics.

Abstract/Full Text

Language Used in Medical Record Can Affect Patient Care

FRIDAY, May 18, 2018 -- Stigmatizing language used in medical records to describe patients can influence medical students and residents in terms of their attitudes towards the patient and their clinical decision-making, according to a study published in the May issue of the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text

Chemicals in Hair Products for Black Women Raise Concerns

FRIDAY, May 18, 2018 -- Multiple chemicals associated with endocrine disruption and asthma are contained in hair products used by black women and children, according to a study published online April 25 in Environmental Research.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Nonprofit Manufacturer Could Keep Generic Drug Costs Down

WEDNESDAY, May 16, 2018 -- A nonprofit manufacturer could help keep generic drug prices down and maintain their supply, according to a perspective piece published in the May 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text

Best Practices Developed for Use of EHR to Enhance Patient Care

WEDNESDAY, May 16, 2018 -- Best practices have been developed for using electronic health records (EHRs) to enhance patient-centered care, according to an article published online in Medical Economics.

Abstract/Full Text

Prescription Med Use in Children Down Overall From 1999 to 2014

TUESDAY, May 15, 2018 -- From 1999 to 2014 there was a decrease in prescription medication use overall among children and adolescents, according to a study published in the May 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Asthma Mortality Inversely Tied to Deprivation in English Young

TUESDAY, May 15, 2018 -- For children and younger adults with asthma, prevalence and admissions increase with deprivation, while mortality is inversely associated with deprivation, according to a study published online May 14 in Thorax.

Abstract/Full Text
Editorial

Objective Measures Needed for Assessing Nasal Obstruction

FRIDAY, May 11, 2018 -- The Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation (NOSE) scale is an adequate subjective measure for assessing nasal airway obstruction (NAO), but more objective measures are required for diagnosis and treatment of NAO, according to a review published online May 10 in JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Novel Thirdhand Smoke Exposure Route Identified

THURSDAY, May 10, 2018 -- Thirdhand smoke (THS), the chemical residue from cigarette smoke that attaches to anything and anyone in the vicinity of a smoke cloud, can still make its way into the air of buildings that currently have a non-smoking designation, according to a study published online May 9 in Science Advances.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Regulatory Requirements Drive Dissatisfaction With EHRs

TUESDAY, May 8, 2018 -- Regulatory requirements are likely to be an important aspect of physician dissatisfaction with electronic health records (EHRs) that is driving burnout, according to an Ideas and Opinions piece published online May 8 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Low Neighborhood Walkability Increases Risk of Asthma in Kids

FRIDAY, May 4, 2018 -- Children living in neighborhoods with low walkability are at increased risk of asthma, according to a study published online April 17 in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Many Organizations Not Meeting Trial Reporting Requirements

FRIDAY, May 4, 2018 -- Many organizations are not meeting the trial registration and results reporting requirements clarified by "The Final Rule," which had a compliance date of April 18, 2017, according to a study published online May 1 in BMC Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text

Living Near Livestock Farms May Help Protect Against Atopy

WEDNESDAY, May 2, 2018 -- Living in close proximity to livestock farms may protect against atopy, according to a study published online April 30 in Occupational & Environmental Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text

Practices Should Be Aware of Correct Way to Fire Employees

TUESDAY, May 1, 2018 -- Physicians should be aware of the correct protocol for, as well as the laws involved in, firing employees, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

Abstract/Full Text

© 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: June 2018


Hide