Skip to Content

Marine Omega-3 Fatty Acid, Vitamin D Do Not Cut Risk for A-Fib

THURSDAY, March 18, 2021 -- Neither marine omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), nor vitamin D3 are associated with a reduction in the risk for incident atrial fibrillation (AF), according to a study published in the March 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Christine M. Albert, M.D., M.P.H., from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, and colleagues examined the effects of long-term administration of supplementation with marine omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D on incident AF in an ancillary 2 x 2 factorial randomized clinical trial involving 25,119 women and men aged 50 years or older. Participants were randomly assigned to EPA-DHA and vitamin D3 (6,272 analyzed); EPA-DHA and placebo (6,270 analyzed); vitamin D3 and placebo (6,281 analyzed); or two placebos (6,296 analyzed).

The researchers found that the primary end point of incident AF occurred in 3.6 percent of the study participants during a median of 5.3 years of treatment and follow-up. Incident AF events occurred in 3.7 and 3.4 percent of participants for the EPA-DHA versus placebo comparison (hazard ratio, 1.09; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.96 to 1.24; P = 0.19). Incident AF events occurred in 3.7 and 3.4 percent of participants for the vitamin D3 versus placebo comparison (hazard ratio, 1.09; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.96 to 1.25; P = 0.19). No evidence was seen for an interaction between the two study agents (hazard ratio, 1.07; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.92 to 1.25; P = 0.39).

"The findings do not support the use of either agent for the primary prevention of incident AF," the authors write.

Pharmavite LLC provided the vitamin D/placebo for the trial, and Quest Diagnostics performed the serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and plasma phospholipid omega-3 measurements. Pronova BioPharma/BASF donated omega-3 fatty acids.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Editor's Note

© 2021 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Read this next

Effectiveness of Anticoagulants Compared for Valvular A-Fib

TUESDAY, March 30, 2021 -- For patients who are new to therapy for valvular atrial fibrillation (AF), direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) as a class are effective and safe compared...

Racial, Socioeconomic Disparities Seen in Atrial Fibrillation Treatment

THURSDAY, March 11, 2021 -- Racial and ethnic-minority groups and those with lower income are less likely to receive rhythm control treatment for atrial fibrillation (AF),...

American Indians Have Highest Risk for Nonhemorrhagic Stroke

WEDNESDAY, March 3, 2021 -- American Indians have the highest risk for nonhemorrhagic stroke, in the presence or absence of atrial fibrillation (AF), according to a study...

More News Resources

Subscribe to our Newsletter

Whatever your topic of interest, subscribe to our newsletters to get the best of Drugs.com in your inbox.