Skip to Content

Health Tip: If Your Child Develops a Fever

-- While a fever generally is not something to be overly concerned about, some cases require a doctor's intervention, the Nemours Foundation says.

Triggers of may fever include an infection, overdressing (particularly newborns) and immunizations.

A high fever should be treated without delay to prevent discomfort and possible dehydration, Nemours says.

If -- despite a fever -- your child is still playing, eating and drinking; is alert, smiling, has a normal skin color and looks well when the body temperature returns to normal, there probably isn't a need to call your doctor, Nemours says.

But you should seek immediate care if there's:

  • Crying that won't stop.
  • Extreme irritability or fussiness.
  • Trouble waking up.
  • A rash or purple spots that look like bruises (that weren't there before your child got sick).
  • Blue lips, tongue or nails.
  • The child's soft spot on the head appears to be bulging or sunken.
  • A stiff neck.
  • A severe headache.
  • Limpness or refusal to move.
  • Trouble breathing that doesn't get better when the nose is cleared.
  • Leaning forward and drooling.
  • Seizure.
  • Moderate-to-severe belly pain.

© 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: November 2018

Read this next

Seizures After Vaccination Don't Affect Kids' Development: Study

WEDNESDAY, July 1, 2020 -- Kids who have a fever-related seizure after getting a vaccine won't have developmental and behavioral problems as a result, according to a new...

Mild COVID-19 Often Appears With Only Gastro Symptoms: Study

WEDNESDAY, April 1, 2020 -- When most people think of COVID-19, they imagine symptoms such as a dry cough and high fever. But new research out of China shows that a minority of...

'Fever Tracker' Suggests Social Distancing Is Already Working

TUESDAY, March 31, 2020 -- The concept is simple, yet elegant: Use fever readings from thermometers to create a database that can show public health officials whether social...