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Health Highlights: March 3, 2017

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

Ebola Epidemic Hero's Death Linked to Continuing Stigma of Virus

A Liberian nurse hailed as a hero during the Ebola epidemic in West Africa died last week, and the lingering stigma of the disease may have played a role.

Salome Karwah was featured on the cover of Time magazine when it collectively gave people who fought to control the spread of Ebola its 2014 Person of the Year award, the Washington Post reported.

Karwah lost her parents to Ebola, survived the disease herself, and provided care to scores of others with the illness.

A writer for Time who met Karwah in 2014 wrote the following about Karwah's recent death from complications of giving birth to her fourth child.

"On Feb. 17 she delivered a healthy boy, Solomon, by Caesarean section. She was discharged from hospital three days later. Within hours of coming home, Karwah lapsed into convulsions. Her husband and her sister rushed her back to the hospital, but no one would touch her. Her foaming mouth and violent seizures panicked the staff. 'They said she was an Ebola survivor,' says her sister by telephone. 'They didn't want contact with her fluids. They all gave her distance. No one would give her an injection.' Karwah died the next day."

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Facebook Launches New Suicide Prevention Tools

New suicide prevention tools are being introduced by Facebook.

People watching a Facebook Live broadcast will now be able to report the video for an escalated response from Facebook, which can contact emergency workers if the person in the video is in immediate danger, the Associated Press reported.

In addition, the person filming the video will see a set of resources pop up on their phone screen, such as a help line.

Other new measures include a streamlined process to report posts about suicide or self-injury, and easier ways for users in distress to contact crisis workers through Messenger, AP reported.

Some suicide prevention tools have been available on Facebook for more than a decade.

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Posted: March 2017

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