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Good Deeds Soothe Stress

SATURDAY, Feb. 3, 2018 -- If the constant stream of bad news from around the world gets to you, one psychiatrist suggests that helping others might make you feel better.

"The sheer volume of stressful events occurring on a near-daily basis can make people feel pessimistic or fearful," said researcher Emanuel Maidenberg, a clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California, Los Angeles.

"As we continue adapting to the ever-increasing speed of the news cycle, it's important to take a moment to explore the impact it is having on how we feel, behave and think, to better take care of ourselves," he added in a university news release.

Maidenberg suggested a number of ways to cope with an uncertain world.

You can gain a sense of control by helping others. Making a donation or volunteering your time to help others can ease feelings of helplessness, he said.

If you feel overwhelmed, seek social support. This could include something like joining a book club or other type of group, Maidenberg explained.

In addition, it's a good idea to do more leisure activities that you enjoy, get more exercise, and maintain a consistent sleep schedule.

Finally, Maidenberg advised, limit your exposure to news. Restrict it to certain times of the day or certain days of the week. It might also be a good idea to limit your sources of news. For example, read a newspaper but don't scroll through Twitter.

© 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: February 2018

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