Skip to Content

Encourage Your Teen to Work Out for Better Learning

FRIDAY, June 7, 2019 -- Exercise is important for all kids, because it boosts their overall health and wards off excess weight. But it holds added benefit for teens: According to a study in The Journal of Pediatrics, it improves their attention, which can help them do better in school.

The greatest payoff came from about an hour a day of moderate-to-vigorous activity, the study found. It seems that sustained exercise at a moderate level releases a specific protein that improves numerous brain functions. But overly vigorous activity could make teens too tired to focus on learning.

These findings suggest that exercise could also help children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as part of an overall care plan.

With many schools cutting back on physical education time during the school day, encourage your teen to take up a sport or activity that calls for a daily conditioning session, ensuring that they'll be active not just on game days. Some kids thrive on team sports, such as soccer and lacrosse, while others do better with activities that allow them to develop more as individuals, such as track and tennis.

If you have home cardio equipment, like a treadmill or exercise bike, suggest that your teen use it while listening to music.

Remember to model the behavior you want your kids to follow, so let them see you working out and having fun doing it. You might even get your teen to agree to some family fitness time on weekends -- and that's something everyone will benefit from.

© 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Posted: June 2019

Read this next

Could Hospital Visit Records Help Docs Spot ADHD, Autism Early?

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2020 -- Kids with autism or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) go to the hospital more in their first year of life than children without these...

Could Mom's Thyroid Levels Influence ADHD in Kids?

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2020 -- Low levels of thyroid hormone during pregnancy may contribute to the development of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in the child, new research...

AHA News: Belly Fat May Signal Early Heart Issues for Mexican Americans

THURSDAY, Oct. 15, 2020 (American Heart Association News) -- Among Mexican Americans, too much abdominal fat predicts the beginning of a buildup of plaque in the arteries called...