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What is the difference between Intrarosa and Osphena?

Medically reviewed by N. France, BPharm. Last updated on March 2, 2021.

Official Answer

by Drugs.com

Intrarosa (prasterone) and Osphena (Ospemifene) are both treatments for moderate to severe dyspareunia - the medical term for difficult or painful sexual intercourse - a symptom of vulvar and vaginal atrophy, caused by menopause. Falling estrogen levels play a key role in the development of menopausal symptoms.

There are a number of differences between Intrarosa and Osphena, including how they are administered, what they contain and how they work. See the table below for more details.

Intrarosa Osphena
Company AMAG Pharmaceuticals Duchesnay
Approved for
  • The treatment of moderate to severe dyspareunia due to vaginal and vulvar atrophy caused by menopause
  • The treatment of moderate to severe dyspareunia due to vaginal and vulvar atrophy caused by menopause
  • The treatment of moderate to severe vaginal dryness due to vaginal and vulvar atrophy caused by menopause
First approved in the US 2016 2013
Active ingredient Prasterone Ospemifene
Type of drug Steroid Selective estrogen-receptor modulator (SERM)
How it works Intrarosa is broken down in the body into active sex hormones (androgens and estrogens). Increasing estrogen levels helps to alleviate the symptoms of menopause Osphena binds to estrogen receptors in the body. In some parts of the body this activates estrogenic pathways and in others it blocks them. Osphena is not a hormone, but it does mimic the effects of estrogen
Formulation Vaginal insert Oral tablet
How it's used Inserted into the vagina using an applicator. Used once daily at bedtime Swallowed once daily, with food
Adverse reactions The most common adverse reactions (≥2%) are vaginal discharge and abnormal Pap smear The most common adverse reactions (≥1%) are:
  • Vaginal discharge
  • Hot flush
  • Muscle spasms
  • Headache
  • Hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating)
  • Vaginal hemorrhage
  • Night sweats

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