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Abuse of acetomyophen and meclizine?
  1. #1
    augsburga is offline New Member
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    Default Abuse of acetomyophen and meclizine?

    Was able to identify 3 pills found in my teenagers room from this site.
    Propoxyphene Napsylate/acetamiphen, 500 mg. acetomiphen, and Meclizine/Antivert an antihistamine for vertigo, nausea. Are these drugs of abuse?

    Egg shaped yellow & white, par and 035

    Found in teenagers room. What is it?

  2. #2
    augsburga is offline New Member
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    Default Abuse of acetomyophen and meclizine?

    Found Propoxyphene Napsylate, LO14 500 mg. acetamyophin and 035 par meclizine Antivert in teenagers room,.. Are these drugs of abuse?

  3. #3
    ariadaun Guest

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    Are these drugs of abuse?

    Propoxyphene Napsylate/acetamiphen is the generic form of the drug Darvocet-N and is a mild narcotic analgesics prescribed for the relief of mild to moderate pain, with or without fever. It can deffinitely be used abusively. It is a narcotic. It can be habit forming. Is a prescription only drug - and it is illegal to have it without a prescription.

    500 mg. acetomiphen - doubt it. Acetaminophen is the same thing as Tylenol. But what does he think they are? That would be the question I would ask.

    Meclizine/Antivert an antihistamine for vertigo, nausea. Meclizine can cause drowsiness. Alcohol, sedatives, and tranquilizers can increase the drowsiness of meclizine . So, yes, it is possible. Taken in higher than therapeutic doses with the intent of causing the side effect of drowsiness would be considered abuse really.

    Egg shaped yellow & white, par and 035 - is Meclizine as well. 25mg pill. And again, without a RX, it is illegal for the child to have these at all - whether they are being used abusively or not. It would still be considered "possession of a controlled substance."

    Honestly, a child or teen having ANY prescription medication that isn't prescribed to them is troubling. It could very well be he thought it was something other than what it really is too. I have seen plenty of junior high and high school age kids taking or selling OTC meds believing they were narcotics or passing them off as other medications too. If it were my kid I would definitely be concerned.

  4. #4
    lyndasay is offline New Member
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    my guess if its a pain killer its addictive trust me

    http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/d...r/a682325.html


  5. #5
    sarmedic is offline New Member
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    That's darvocet I believe. May as well be codeine, vicodin, or some other painkiller. Those types of drugs have a high abuse problem, and since this has tylenol in it, in higher doses it can harm the liver quite easily. (especially if mixed with alcohol.)

    I'm a real paramedic, I don't just play one on TV.

  6. #6
    postmortem_cowboy is offline New Member
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    propoxyphene hydrochloride or Darvocet N is a controlled substance, the tylenol that is in it is not controlled, it's the morphine that is matched with the tylenol that is controlled. Darvocet is a schedule IV medication which means it has a low-er rate of abuse, yet it is a drug that can and does get abused due to the morphine that it has in it.

    Scheduled drugs are from I through V (1-5), all the schedule I drugs have no clinical use except within the scope of research, IE LSD, >>>>>>, marijuana but california made a new law), mesacline, peyote. Schedule I medications are not obtainable by prescription but may be legally procured for researc, study or instructional use only.

    Schedule II drugs have a high abuse potential and high liability for severe psychological or physical dependence. Prescription is required and cannot be renewed. Includes opium derivatives, other opioids, and short acting barbiturates. Examples are amphetamines, cocaine, meperidine, porphine, secobarbital.

    Scheudle III have a potential for abuse but is less than that for drugs in schules I and II. Moderate to low physical dependence and high psychological dependence. Includes certain stimulants and depressants not included in the abuve schdules and preparations containing limited quantities of certain opioids. Examples chlorphentermine, gluththimide, mazindol, paragoric, phendimetrazine. Prescription required.

    Schedule IV have a lower potential for abuse than sch III drugs, examples, certain psychotropics (tranquilizers), chloral hydrate, chlordiazepoxide, diapzepam, meprobamate, phnobarbital, prescription required.

    Schedule V abuse potential less than that for sched IV drugs. Preparations contain limited quantities of certain narcotic drugs; generally intended for antitussive and antidiarrheal purposes and may be distributed without a prescription under certain circumstances.

    Hope that sort of helps out.


    Cowboy.

  7. #7
    nroscipnk is offline New Member
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    I'd be more worried about the dextropropoxyphene than the meclizine. Meclizine is used primarily, like dramamine, as an antiemetic, that is helps to stop nausea/vomiting usually attributed to motion sickness. This is available in many forms without a prescription, in any grocery store or pharmacy. While it can be abused, its side-effects are far less than dramamine's, which would cause much greater drowsiness, etc.

    I'd be more concerned about her taking dextropropoxyphene/acetaminophen. It has a relatively high abuse potential being that it's a) a mild narcotic painkiller, and b) has shown a particular history of tolerance and dependency. The tolerance is more medically relevant; as an individual becomes tolerant, they will have to use higher and higher doses to attain the same sensations of analgesia and sedation as when they first started. It's dangerous primarily because of risk of opioid overdose, but also because it has acetaminophen mixed in, which carries a relatively certain risk of liver damage in overdose cases.

    If your daughter thinks that narcotics mixed with antihistamines for sedation are the way to get over her problems, do what I would do: Show her support, offer help, be there for her. Be stern however. If she has an addiction, well, you need to understand that addicts, willingly or not, will manipulate to get their end. Keep a close eye out. Be a mom. She might "hate" you now, but she will thank you.

    I wish you the best, message me if you have any questions!

    Dr. J.

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