Skip to Content

Lioresal FDA Alerts

The FDA Alert(s) below may be specifically about Lioresal or relate to a group or class of drugs which include Lioresal (baclofen).

MedWatch Safety Alerts are distributed by the FDA and published by Drugs.com. Following is a list of possible medication recalls, market withdrawals, alerts and warnings. For the latest FDA MedWatch alerts, go here.

Recent FDA Alert(s) for baclofen

Baclofen Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient from Taizhou Xinyou Pharmaceutical and Chemical: FDA Statement - FDA Warns of Potential Contamination

Dec 10, 2015

Audience: Health Professional, Anesthesiology, Pain Management, Neurology, Pharmacy

[Posted 12/09/2015]

ISSUE: FDA is alerting drug compounders that certain lots of baclofen active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) manufactured by Taizhou Xinyou Pharmaceutical & Chemical Co., Limited (Taizhou) Taizhou City, Zhejiang Province, China, may be at risk for contamination with particulates and should not be used to compound sterile injectable drugs.

BACKGROUND: Taizhou manufactures APIs for repackagers and distributors, some of which sell these products to compounding facilities in the United States. FDA contacted Taizhou through its US agent, and the company confirmed that, due to the level of controls in the manufacturing process, the baclofen API it manufactures is not suitable for use in injectable drugs. Based on available information, the affected API may potentially pose serious safety risks for U.S. patients who use or receive injectable drug products compounded with the affected baclofen, especially when administered directly into the spinal column. For example, use of baclofen API contaminated with particulate matter can result in serious injury if injected directly into the spinal column and may also clog pumps used to administer the medication. There is also a potential risk that the baclofen API may be contaminated by endotoxin or microorganisms.  FDA is continuing to investigate this incident.
 
RECOMMENDATION: FDA recommends that no baclofen API from Taizhou be used to manufacture or compound any injectable drugs.

Healthcare professionals and patients are encouraged to report adverse events or side effects related to the use of these products to the FDA's MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:


[12/09/2015 - FDA Statement]

Warfarin Sodium Tablets (Jantoven), 3mg: Recall - Mislabeled Bottles Containing Higher Dosage

Feb 21, 2011

Audience: Pharmacy, Family Practice, Consumer

[UPDATED 02/21/2011] Expansion of Recall: Affected Products Include Amantadine, Amlodipine, Androxy, Baclofen, Bethanechol, Jantoven and Oxybutynin

[Posted 02/17/2011]

ISSUE: Upsher-Smith Laboratories and FDA notified healthcare professionals of the recall of one lot of Jantoven Warfarin Sodium, USP, 3mg Tablets, an anticoagulant, after a single bottle labeled as Jantoven Warfarin Sodium, USP, 3mg Tablets was found to contain tablets at a higher 10mg strength. To date, the company has identified no additional mislabeled bottles. 

BACKGROUND: The recalled lot is numbered as #284081, with an expiration date of September 2012. The product lot was distributed to wholesalers, retail chains and independent pharmacies throughout the United States. The primary risk of substituting 10mg warfarin for 3mg warfarin is overdosing more than 3 times the labeled amount which leads to excessive anticoagulation that could be expected to result in life-threatening hemorrhage in patients.   

RECOMMENDATION: The two Jantoven tablets (see photo at link below) can be readily identified by color: the 3mg tablet is tan and the 10mg tablet is white. In addition, the 3mg tablet is imprinted with the letters WRF, a line, and the number 3 below the line. The reverse side of the 3mg tablet carries the number 832. The 10mg tablet is imprinted with the letters WRF, a line, and the number 10 below the line. The reverse side of the 10mg tablet carries the number 832. Consumers and pharmacists can call the Upsher-Smith medical information line at 1-888-650-3789 for more information and to access product details, Monday-Friday between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. (CST).


Healthcare professionals and patients are encouraged to report adverse events, side effects, or product quality problems related to the use of these products to the FDA's MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:

Injectable drugs prepared by Urgent Care Pharmacy

Nov 18, 2002

Audience: All healthcare professionals

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced a nationwide alert concerning all injectable drugs prepared by Urgent Care Pharmacy of Spartanburg, South Carolina, based on the lack of assurance that their products are sterile. Non-sterility of injectable products can represent a serious hazard to health that could lead to life-threatening injuries and death. FDA inspection of Urgent Care's facility revealed the firm failed to have adequate controls to ensure necessary sterility, including the absence of appropriate testing for potency and sterility prior to distribution.

FDA is aware that Urgent Care has distributed the following injectable drugs to physicians, hospitals, clinics and consumers in Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Mississippi, New Hampshire, North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia: Baclofen, Betamethasone, Bimix 30:1, (Phentolamine mesylate/papaverine), Clonidine, Estradiol, Hydromorphone HCl, Fentanyl, methylprednisolone acetate, Morphine Sulfate/Bupivacaine, Papaverine HCl, Super Trimix (Papaverine HCl/phentolamine mesylate/prostaglandin), Testosterone cypionate, Testosterone/Estradiol.

[November 15, 2002 Talk Paper - FDA]

More Lioresal Resources