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Current Drug Shortages

Drug shortages can have a significant impact on patient care and public health. Drugs in short supply often include sterile injectables and potentially life-saving oncology (cancer) treatments. Besides the lack of effective drug treatment, many other areas of medical care can be impacted, including medical procedure delays, treatment protocol delays, rates of medication errors, patient health outcomes, and cost. Notice from manufacturers to the FDA about impending or current drug shortages allows the FDA to work with the manufacturers to prevent a drastic shortage.

Drug Shortage Bulletins are copyrighted by the Drug Information Service of the University of Utah, provided by ASHP as its exclusive authorized distributor, and used with permission. It is a searchable database that provides up-to-date information for consumers and healthcare professionals related to current drug shortages. Results can be sorted by generic name or latest revision date. Information related to affected product, reason for shortage, available products, estimated resupply dates, and alternative drug therapy is listed for each individual agent.

Related: U.S. Drug Shortages: Root Causes and Recent Statistics

Current | Resolved | Discontinued

Generic Name Revision Date
Gentamicin Sulfate Ophthalmic Ointment June 9, 2020
Sodium Acetate Injection June 8, 2020
Nimodipine Oral Solution May 26, 2020

Drug Shortage Bulletins are copyrighted by the Drug Information Service of the University of Utah, provided by ASHP as its exclusive authorized distributor, and used with permission. ASHP and the University of Utah make no representations or warranties, express or implied, including, but not limited to, any implied warranty of merchantability and/or fitness for a particular purpose, with respect to such information, and specifically disclaim all such warranties. Users of this information are advised that decisions regarding the use of drugs and drug therapies are complex medical decisions and that in using this information, each user must exercise his or her own independent professional judgment. Neither ASHP nor the University of Utah assumes any liability for persons administering or receiving drugs or other medical care in reliance upon this information, or otherwise in connection with this Bulletin. Neither ASHP nor the University of Utah endorses or recommends the use of any particular drug.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.