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Drug interactions between cabozantinib and vandetanib

Results for the following 2 drugs:
cabozantinib
vandetanib

Interactions between your drugs

Major

vandetanib ↔ cabozantinib

Applies to:vandetanib and cabozantinib

Consumer information for this interaction is not currently available.

GENERALLY AVOID: Vandetanib can cause concentration-dependent prolongation of the QT interval. Theoretically, coadministration with other agents that can prolong the QT interval may result in additive effects and increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias including torsade de pointes and sudden death. In a phase 3 clinical trial where 231 medullary thyroid cancer patients were randomized to receive vandetanib 300 mg once daily, mean change in QTcF (Fridericia-corrected QT interval) from baseline based on the exposure-response relationship was 35 ms for the 300 mg dose. The QTcF increase remained above 30 ms for the duration of the trial (up to 2 years). In addition, 36% of patients experienced greater than 60 ms QTcF increases from baseline and 4.3% had QTcF greater than 500 ms. Vandetanib treatment alone has been associated with reported cases of torsade de pointes, ventricular tachycardia, and sudden death. In general, the risk of an individual agent or a combination of agents causing ventricular arrhythmia in association with QT prolongation is largely unpredictable but may be increased by certain underlying risk factors such as congenital long QT syndrome, cardiac disease, and electrolyte disturbances (e.g., hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, hypocalcemia). Moreover, the extent of drug-induced QT prolongation is dependent on the particular drug(s) involved and dosage(s) of the drug(s).

MANAGEMENT: Coadministration of vandetanib with other drugs that can prolong the QT interval should generally be avoided. Should treatment with other QT-prolonging drugs be required, the manufacturer recommends more frequent monitoring of the ECG as well as serum potassium, magnesium, and calcium levels. Given vandetanib's half-life of 19 days, ECGs and serum electrolytes should typically be obtained at baseline, at 2 to 4 weeks and 8 to 12 weeks after starting treatment, and every 3 months thereafter. Vandetanib should not be started if baseline QTcF is greater than 450 ms, and treatment should be interrupted if QTcF is greater than 500 ms. Treatment may resume when QTcF returns to less than 450 ms, but at a reduced dosage. In addition, hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, and/or hypocalcemia must be corrected prior to vandetanib administration. Since diarrhea is a common side effect of vandetanib and may cause electrolyte imbalances, ECG and electrolyte levels should also be monitored more frequently when diarrhea develops. Vandetanib treatment should be stopped in the presence of severe diarrhea. Treatment may resume when diarrhea improves, but at a reduced dosage. Following any dosage reduction, or any interruption of treatment greater than 2 weeks, QT assessment and serum electrolytes should be conducted as described previously. Patients should be advised to seek prompt medical attention if they experience symptoms that could indicate the occurrence of torsade de pointes such as dizziness, lightheadedness, fainting, palpitation, irregular heart rhythm, shortness of breath, or syncope. Because of the drug's long half-life, adverse reactions including a prolonged QT interval may not resolve quickly, thus appropriate monitoring is necessary.

References

  1. Cerner Multum, Inc. "Australian Product Information." O 0
  2. Cerner Multum, Inc. "UK Summary of Product Characteristics." O 0
  3. Canadian Pharmacists Association "e-CPS. Available from: URL: http://www.pharmacists.ca/function/Subscriptions/ecps.cfm?link=eCPS_quikLink."
  4. "Product Information. Vandetanib (vandetanib)." Astra-Zeneca Pharmaceuticals, Wilmington, DE.
View all 4 references

Drug and food interactions

Moderate

cabozantinib food

Applies to: cabozantinib

Cabozantinib should be taken on an empty stomach, one hour before or two hours after a meal. Do not consume grapefruit, grapefruit juice, or any supplements that contain grapefruit extract during treatment with cabozantinib unless directed otherwise by your doctor. Grapefruit juice can increase the blood levels of cabozantinib. You may be more likely to experience side effects such as nausea; vomiting; diarrhea; loss of appetite; weight loss; mouth sores; abdominal pain; skin rash (primarily on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet); delayed wound healing; high blood pressure; and impaired bone marrow function resulting in low numbers of different types of blood cells, which can increase the risk of bleeding problems and infections. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

Switch to professional interaction data

Therapeutic duplication warnings

Therapeutic duplication is the use of more than one medicine from the same drug category or therapeutic class to treat the same condition. This can be intentional in cases where drugs with similar actions are used together for demonstrated therapeutic benefit. It can also be unintentional in cases where a patient has been treated by more than one doctor, or had prescriptions filled at more than one pharmacy, and can have potentially adverse consequences.

Duplication

VEGF/VEGFR inhibitors

Therapeutic duplication

The recommended maximum number of medicines in the 'VEGF/VEGFR inhibitors' category to be taken concurrently is usually one. Your list includes two medicines belonging to the 'VEGF/VEGFR inhibitors' category:

  • cabozantinib
  • vandetanib

Note: The benefits of taking this combination of medicines may outweigh any risks associated with therapeutic duplication. This information does not take the place of talking to your doctor. Always check with your healthcare provider to determine if any adjustments to your medications are needed.

Duplication

Multikinase inhibitors

Therapeutic duplication

The recommended maximum number of medicines in the 'multikinase inhibitors' category to be taken concurrently is usually one. Your list includes two medicines belonging to the 'multikinase inhibitors' category:

  • cabozantinib
  • vandetanib

Note: The benefits of taking this combination of medicines may outweigh any risks associated with therapeutic duplication. This information does not take the place of talking to your doctor. Always check with your healthcare provider to determine if any adjustments to your medications are needed.

Drug Interaction Classification

The classifications below are a guideline only. The relevance of a particular drug interaction to a specific patient is difficult to determine using this tool alone given the large number of variables that may apply.
Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.
Unknown No information available.

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider.

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Multum is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. Multum's information is a reference resource designed as supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge, and judgement of healthcare practitioners in patient care. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for any given patient. Multum Information Services, Inc. does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. Copyright 2000-2018 Multum Information Services, Inc. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist.

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