Skip to Content

Dutrebis (lamivudine / raltegravir) Disease Interactions

There are 6 disease interactions with Dutrebis (lamivudine / raltegravir):

Major

Nrtis (Includes Dutrebis) ↔ Pancreatitis

Severe Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Hyperlipidemia, Pancreatitis, Alcoholism

The reverse transcriptase inhibitors, didanosine (ddI), zalcitabine (ddC), stavudine (d4T) and lamivudine (3TC), may cause pancreatitis. The incidence is generally low but is approximately 7% with ddI, and up to 15% in pediatric patients given 3TC. Patients with a history of or known risk factors for pancreatitis, such as alcohol abuse or hypertriglyceridemia, should be monitored closely during therapy with these agents. Therapy should be discontinued at the first signs or symptoms suggestive of pancreatitis (e.g., nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, hyperamylasemia with dysglycemia, rising triglycerides, decreasing serum calcium), and preferably permanently discontinued if clinical pancreatitis develops.

References

  1. "Product Information. Zerit (stavudine)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  2. van Leeuwen R, Katlama C, Kitchen V, Boucher CA, Tubiana R, McBride M, Ingrand D, Weber J, Hill A, McDade H, et al "Evaluation of safety and efficacy of 3TC (lamivudine) in patients with asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic human immunodeficiency virus infection: a phase I/II study." J Infect Dis 171 (1995): 1166-71
  3. van Leeuwen R, Lange JM, Hussey EK, Donn KH, Hall ST, Harker AJ, Jonker P, Danner SA "The safety and pharmacokinetics of a reverse transcriptase inhibitor, 3TC, in patients with HIV infection: a phase I study." AIDS 6 (1992): 1471-5
  4. Yarchoan R, Mitsuya H, Pluda JM, et al "The National Cancer Institute phase I study of 2',3'-dideoxyinosine administration in adults with AIDS-related complex: analysis of activity and toxicity profiles." Rev Infect Dis 12 (1990): s522-33
  5. Dolin R, Lambert JS, Morse GD, et al "2',3'-dideoxyinosine in patients with AIDS or AIDS-related complex." Rev Infect Dis 12 (1990): s540-51
  6. Pike IM, Nicaise C "The didanosine Expanded Access Program: safety analysis." Clin Infect Dis 16 (1993): S63-8
  7. "Product Information. Epivir (lamivudine)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.
  8. Shelton MJ, O'Donnell AM, Morse GD "Didanosine." Ann Pharmacother 26 (1992): 660-70
  9. "Product Information. HIVID (zalcitabine)." Roche Laboratories, Nutley, NJ.
  10. Matthews SJ, Cersosimo RJ, Spivack ML "Zidovudine and other reverse transcriptase inhibitors in the management of human immunodeficiency virus-related disease." Pharmacotherapy 11 (1991): 419-49
  11. Whittington R, Brogden RN "Zalcitabine: a review of its pharmacology and clinical potential in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)." Drugs 44 (1992): 656-83
  12. Schindzielorz A, Pike I, Daniels M, Pacelli L, Smaldone L "Rates and risk factors for adverse events associated with didanosine in the expanded access program." Clin Infect Dis 19 (1994): 1076-83
  13. Grasela TH, Walawander CA, Beltangady M, Knupp CA, Martin RR, Dunkle LM, Barbhaiya RH, Pittman KA, Dolin R, Valentine FT, "Analysis of potential risk factors associated with the development of pancreatitis in phase i patients with AIDS or AIDS-related complex receiving didanosine." J Infect Dis 169 (1994): 1250-5
  14. Bouvet E, Casalino E, Prevost MH, Vachon F "Fatal case of 2',3'-dideoxyinosine-associated pancreatitis." Lancet 336 (1990): 1515
  15. Montaner JSG, Rachlis A, Beaulieu R, Gill J, Schlech W, Phillips P, Auclair C, Boulerice F, Schindzielorz A, Smaldone L, Wainber "Safety profile of didanosine among patients with advanced HIV disease who are intolerant to or deteriorate despite zidovudine therapy: results of the canadian open ddi treatment program." J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 7 (1994): 924-30
  16. "Product Information. Videx (didanosine)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  17. Moore RD, Fortgang I, Keruly J, Chaisson RE "Adverse events from drug therapy for human immunodeficiency virus disease." Am J Med 101 (1996): 34-40
  18. Maxson CJ, Greenfield SM, Turner JL "Acute pancreatitis as a common complication of 2',3'-dideoxyinosine therapy in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome." Am J Gastroenterol 87 (1992): 708-13
View all 18 references
Major

Nrtis (Includes Dutrebis) ↔ Renal Dysfunction

Severe Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Renal Dysfunction

Patients with clinically significant renal impairment may be at greater risk for toxicities and adverse effects from nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) due to decreased drug clearance. Dosage adjustments are recommended. In addition, these patients should be monitored closely during NRTI therapy, and dosages adjusted further if necessary.

References

  1. "Product Information. HIVID (zalcitabine)." Roche Laboratories, Nutley, NJ.
  2. "Product Information. Zerit (stavudine)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  3. "Product Information. Retrovir (zidovudine)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.
  4. "Product Information. Epivir (lamivudine)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.
View all 4 references
Moderate

Raltegravir (Includes Dutrebis) ↔ Hemodialysis

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: hemodialysis

There were no clinically important pharmacokinetic differences between subjects with severe renal impairment and healthy subjects. No dosage adjustment is necessary for these patients. Because the extent to which raltegravir may be dialyzable is unknown, dosing before a dialysis session should be avoided.

Moderate

Raltegravir (Includes Dutrebis) ↔ Liver Disease

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Liver Disease

There were no clinically important pharmacokinetic differences between subjects with moderate hepatic impairment and healthy subjects. No dosage adjustment is necessary for patients with mild to moderate hepatic impairment. Therapy with raltegravir should be administered with caution in patients with severe hepatic impairment, as the pharmacokinetics of raltegravir have not been studied in this population. Liver transaminases and bilirubin should regularly be monitored during therapy.

Moderate

Raltegravir (Includes Dutrebis) ↔ Myopathy/Rhabdomyolysis

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Myopathy

The use of raltegravir has been associated with creatine kinase elevations. There have been reports of myopathy and rhabdomyolysis in patients taking raltegravir. Therapy with raltegravir should be used with caution in patients at increased risk of myopathy or rhabdomyolysis, such as patients receiving concomitant medications known to cause these conditions or patients with a history of rhabdomyolysis, myopathy or increased serum creatine kinase levels.

Moderate

Raltegravir (Includes Dutrebis) ↔ Pku

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Phenylketonuria

Isentress (brand of raltegravir) chewable tablets contain phenylalanine. The 25 mg chewable tablet contains approximately 0.05 mg phenylalanine and the 100 mg contains approximately 0.10 mg phenylalanine. The phenylalanine content should be considered when this product is used in patients who must restrict their intake of phenylalanine (i.e. phenylketonuria).

Dutrebis (lamivudine / raltegravir) drug Interactions

There are 155 drug interactions with Dutrebis (lamivudine / raltegravir)

Dutrebis (lamivudine / raltegravir) alcohol/food Interactions

There is 1 alcohol/food interaction with Dutrebis (lamivudine / raltegravir)

Drug Interaction Classification

The classifications below are a general guideline only. It is difficult to determine the relevance of a particular drug interaction to any individual given the large number of variables.
Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.
Unknown No information available.

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider.

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Multum is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. Multum's information is a reference resource designed as supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge, and judgement of healthcare practitioners in patient care. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for any given patient. Multum Information Services, Inc. does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. Copyright 2000-2018 Multum Information Services, Inc. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist.

Hide