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Celestone Phosphate (betamethasone) Disease Interactions

There are 23 disease interactions with Celestone Phosphate (betamethasone):

Major

Corticosteroids (Includes Celestone Phosphate) ↔ (+) Tuberculin Test

Severe Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Tuberculosis -- Latent, History - Tuberculosis

In patients with latent tuberculosis or tuberculin reactivity, the use of pharmacologic dosages of corticosteroids may cause a reactivation of the disease. Close monitoring for signs and symptoms of tuberculosis is recommended if corticosteroid therapy is administered to patients with a history of tuberculosis or tuberculin reactivity. During prolonged corticosteroid therapy, tuberculosis chemoprophylaxis may be considered.

References

  1. "Product Information. Decadron (dexamethasone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  2. "Product Information. Medrol (methylprednisolone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  3. "Product Information. Deltasone (prednisone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  4. "Product Information. Celestone (betamethasone)." Schering Corporation, Kenilworth, NJ.
  5. "Product Information. Florinef Acetate (fludrocortisone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  6. "Product Information. Hydrocortone (hydrocortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  7. "Product Information. Hydeltrasol (prednisolone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  8. Swartz SL, Dluhy RG "Corticosteroids: clinical pharmacology and therapeutic use." Drugs 16 (1978): 238-55
  9. "Product Information. Cortone Acetate (cortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  10. "Product Information. Kenalog (triamcinolone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
View all 10 references
Major

Corticosteroids (Includes Celestone Phosphate) ↔ Electrolyte Imbalance

Severe Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Hypernatremia, Hypocalcemia, Hypokalemia, Seizures, Electrolyte Abnormalities

Corticosteroids can cause hypernatremia, hypokalemia, and fluid retention. These mineralocorticoid effects are most significant with fludrocortisone, followed by hydrocortisone and cortisone, then by prednisone and prednisolone. The remaining corticosteroids, betamethasone, dexamethasone, methylprednisolone, and triamcinolone, have little mineralocorticoid activities. However, large doses of any corticosteroid can demonstrate these effects, particularly if given for longer than brief periods. All corticosteroids also increase excretion of calcium and can cause hypocalcemia. Therapy with corticosteroids should be administered cautiously in patients with preexisting electrolyte disturbances. Caution is also advised when treating patients with seizure disorders, since electrolyte disturbances may trigger seizure activity.

References

  1. "Product Information. Medrol (methylprednisolone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  2. "Product Information. Celestone (betamethasone)." Schering Corporation, Kenilworth, NJ.
  3. Morris GC, Egan JG, Jones MK "Hypokalaemic paralysis induced by bolus prednisolone in Graves' disease." Aust N Z J Med 22 (1992): 312
  4. "Product Information. Kenalog (triamcinolone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  5. Ramsahoye BH, Davies SV, el-Gaylani N, Sandeman D, Scanlon MF "The mineralocorticoid effects of high dose hydrocortisone." BMJ 310 (1995): 656-7
  6. "Product Information. Florinef Acetate (fludrocortisone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  7. Lieberman P, Patterson R, Kunske R "Complications of long-term steroid therapy for asthma." J Allergy Clin Immunol 49 (1972): 329-36
  8. Powell JR "Steroid and hypokalemic myopathy after corticosteroids for ulcerative colitis. Systemic and tropical application." Am J Gastroenterol 52 (1969): 425-32
  9. "Product Information. Deltasone (prednisone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  10. Seale JP, Compton MR "Side-effects of corticosteroid agents." Med J Aust 144 (1986): 139-42
  11. Thomas TP "The complications of systemic corticosteroid therapy in the elderly." Gerontology 30 (1984): 60-5
  12. "Product Information. Hydeltrasol (prednisolone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  13. "Product Information. Hydrocortone (hydrocortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  14. "Product Information. Decadron (dexamethasone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  15. "Product Information. Cortone Acetate (cortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
View all 15 references
Major

Corticosteroids (Includes Celestone Phosphate) ↔ Gi Perforation

Severe Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Intestinal Anastomoses, Diverticulitis, Ulcerative Colitis

Corticosteroids may cause gastrointestinal perforation and hemorrhage, usually when given in high dosages or for prolonged periods. They may also mask symptoms of complications such as peritonitis or intraabdominal sepsis. Therapy with corticosteroids should be administered cautiously in patients with diverticulitis, nonspecific ulcerative colitis (if there is a probability of impending perforation, abscess, or other pyogenic infection), or recent intestinal anastomoses.

References

  1. Fadul CE, Lemann W, Thaler HT, Posner JB "Perforation of the gastrointestinal tract in patients receiving steroids for neurologic disease." Neurology 38 (1988): 348-52
  2. "Product Information. Deltasone (prednisone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  3. "Product Information. Celestone (betamethasone)." Schering Corporation, Kenilworth, NJ.
  4. "Product Information. Medrol (methylprednisolone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  5. Baethge BA, Lidsky MD, Goldberg JW "A study of adverse effects of high-dose intravenous (pulse) methylprednisolone therapy in patients with rheumatic disease." Ann Pharmacother 26 (1992): 316-20
  6. Chrousos GA, Kattah JC, Beck RW, Cleary PA "Side effects of glucocorticoid treatment. Experience of the Optic Neuritis Treatment Trial." JAMA 269 (1993): 2110-2
  7. Swartz SL, Dluhy RG "Corticosteroids: clinical pharmacology and therapeutic use." Drugs 16 (1978): 238-55
  8. Seale JP, Compton MR "Side-effects of corticosteroid agents." Med J Aust 144 (1986): 139-42
  9. "Product Information. Kenalog (triamcinolone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  10. "Product Information. Cortone Acetate (cortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  11. ReMine SG, McIlrath DC "Bowel perforation in steroid-treated patients." Ann Surg 192 (1980): 581-6
  12. "Product Information. Hydrocortone (hydrocortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  13. Bohrer H, Schmidt H, Bach A, Bottiger BW, Motsch J "Masking of the symptoms of esophageal and bowel perforation by combination treatment of sepsis with polyvalent immunoglobulins and low-dose hydrocortisone." Hepatogastroenterology 43 (1996): 515-8
  14. "Product Information. Florinef Acetate (fludrocortisone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  15. "Product Information. Decadron (dexamethasone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  16. Thomas TP "The complications of systemic corticosteroid therapy in the elderly." Gerontology 30 (1984): 60-5
  17. "Product Information. Hydeltrasol (prednisolone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  18. Heimdal K, Hirschberg H, Slettebo H, Watne K, Nome O, Sletteb H "High incidence of serious side effects of high-dose dexamethasone treatment in patients with epidural spinal cord compression." J Neurooncol 12 (1992): 141-4
View all 18 references
Major

Corticosteroids (Includes Celestone Phosphate) ↔ Infections

Severe Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Infection - Bacterial/Fungal/Protozoal/Viral

The immunosuppressant and anti-inflammatory effects of corticosteroids, particularly in higher dosages, may decrease host resistance to infectious agents, decrease the ability to localize infections, and mask the symptoms of infection. Secondary infections may be more likely to develop. In general, corticosteroids should not be used in patients with active infections, especially systemic fungal infections, unless they are medically necessary and effective antimicrobial therapy or other appropriate treatment has been instituted. However, for corticosteroid-dependent patients who develop a severe or life-threatening infection, continuation of corticosteroid therapy with at least physiologic replacement dosages should be considered, since these patients may have secondary adrenocortical insufficiency. Removal of external steroid during periods of stress may be detrimental to these patients.

References

  1. Swartz SL, Dluhy RG "Corticosteroids: clinical pharmacology and therapeutic use." Drugs 16 (1978): 238-55
  2. "Product Information. Hydeltrasol (prednisolone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  3. "Product Information. Cortone Acetate (cortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  4. "Product Information. Hydrocortone (hydrocortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  5. "Product Information. Decadron (dexamethasone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  6. Seale JP, Compton MR "Side-effects of corticosteroid agents." Med J Aust 144 (1986): 139-42
  7. Berger BB, Weinberg RS, Tessler HH, Wyhinny GJ, Vygantas CM "Bilateral cytomegalovirus panuveitis after high-dose corticosteroid therapy." Am J Ophthalmol 88 (1979): 1020-5
  8. Baethge BA, Lidsky MD, Goldberg JW "A study of adverse effects of high-dose intravenous (pulse) methylprednisolone therapy in patients with rheumatic disease." Ann Pharmacother 26 (1992): 316-20
  9. "Product Information. Deltasone (prednisone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  10. "Product Information. Medrol (methylprednisolone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  11. Borges AA, Krasnow SH, Wadleigh RG, Cohen MH "Nocardiosis after corticosteroid therapy for malignant thymoma." Cancer 71 (1993): 1746-50
  12. Fauci AS, Braunwald E, Isselbacher KJ, Wilson JD, Martin JB, Kasper DL, Hauser SL, Longo DL, eds. "Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine. 14th ed." New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Health Professionals Division (1998):
  13. "Product Information. Florinef Acetate (fludrocortisone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  14. Weissman DE, Dufer D, Vogel V, Abeloff MD "Corticosteroid toxicity in neuro-oncology patients." J Neurooncol 5 (1987): 125-8
  15. "Product Information. Kenalog (triamcinolone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  16. Cisneros JR, Murray KM "Corticosteroids in tuberculosis." Ann Pharmacother 30 (1996): 1298-303
  17. DeMaria EJ, Reichman W, Kenney PR, Armitage JM, Gann DS "Septic complications of corticosteroid administration after central nervous system trauma." Ann Surg 202 (1985): 248-52
  18. Carrel TP, Schaffner A, Schmid ER, Schneider J, Bauer EP, Laske A, von Segesser LK, Turina MI "Fatal fungal pericarditis after cardiac surgery and immunosuppression." J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 101 (1991): 161-4
  19. "Product Information. Celestone (betamethasone)." Schering Corporation, Kenilworth, NJ.
View all 19 references
Major

Corticosteroids (Includes Celestone Phosphate) ↔ Mi

Severe Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Myocardial Infarction, Post MI Syndrome

The use of corticosteroids may be associated with left ventricular free-wall rupture in patients who have had a recent myocardial infarction. Pharmacologic dosages of corticosteroids should be administered with great caution in such patients.

References

  1. "Product Information. Decadron (dexamethasone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  2. "Product Information. Cortone Acetate (cortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  3. "Product Information. Medrol (methylprednisolone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  4. "Product Information. Deltasone (prednisone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  5. "Product Information. Florinef Acetate (fludrocortisone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  6. "Product Information. Kenalog (triamcinolone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  7. "Product Information. Celestone (betamethasone)." Schering Corporation, Kenilworth, NJ.
  8. "Product Information. Hydeltrasol (prednisolone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  9. "Product Information. Hydrocortone (hydrocortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
View all 9 references
Major

Corticosteroids (Includes Celestone Phosphate) ↔ Ocular Herpes Simplex

Severe Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Ocular Herpes Simplex

Pharmacologic dosages of corticosteroids should be used cautiously in patients with ocular herpes simplex because of the risk of corneal perforation.

References

  1. "Product Information. Deltasone (prednisone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  2. "Product Information. Celestone (betamethasone)." Schering Corporation, Kenilworth, NJ.
  3. "Product Information. Medrol (methylprednisolone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  4. "Product Information. Florinef Acetate (fludrocortisone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  5. "Product Information. Kenalog (triamcinolone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  6. "Product Information. Hydeltrasol (prednisolone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  7. "Product Information. Cortone Acetate (cortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  8. "Product Information. Decadron (dexamethasone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  9. "Product Information. Hydrocortone (hydrocortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
View all 9 references
Major

Corticosteroids (Includes Celestone Phosphate) ↔ Pud

Severe Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: History - Peptic Ulcer, Peptic Ulcer

Corticosteroids may cause peptic ulcer disease and gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage, usually when given in high dosages or for prolonged periods. However, even conventional dosages may aggravate symptoms in patients with a history of peptic ulcers. Delayed healing of ulcers has also been reported. Therapy with corticosteroids should be administered cautiously in patients with active or latent peptic ulcers or other risk factors for GI bleeding. Some clinicians recommend the use of prophylactic antacids or H2-antagonists between meals when large doses of corticosteroids are necessary.

References

  1. Thomas TP "The complications of systemic corticosteroid therapy in the elderly." Gerontology 30 (1984): 60-5
  2. Heimdal K, Hirschberg H, Slettebo H, Watne K, Nome O, Sletteb H "High incidence of serious side effects of high-dose dexamethasone treatment in patients with epidural spinal cord compression." J Neurooncol 12 (1992): 141-4
  3. Weissman DE, Dufer D, Vogel V, Abeloff MD "Corticosteroid toxicity in neuro-oncology patients." J Neurooncol 5 (1987): 125-8
  4. "Product Information. Kenalog (triamcinolone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  5. Lieberman P, Patterson R, Kunske R "Complications of long-term steroid therapy for asthma." J Allergy Clin Immunol 49 (1972): 329-36
  6. "Product Information. Florinef Acetate (fludrocortisone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  7. "Product Information. Celestone (betamethasone)." Schering Corporation, Kenilworth, NJ.
  8. Fauci AS, Braunwald E, Isselbacher KJ, Wilson JD, Martin JB, Kasper DL, Hauser SL, Longo DL, eds. "Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine. 14th ed." New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Health Professionals Division (1998):
  9. Seale JP, Compton MR "Side-effects of corticosteroid agents." Med J Aust 144 (1986): 139-42
  10. "Product Information. Decadron (dexamethasone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  11. "Product Information. Medrol (methylprednisolone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  12. Baethge BA, Lidsky MD, Goldberg JW "A study of adverse effects of high-dose intravenous (pulse) methylprednisolone therapy in patients with rheumatic disease." Ann Pharmacother 26 (1992): 316-20
  13. Messer J, Reitman D, Sacks HS, et al "Association of adrenocorticosteroid therapy and peptic-ulcer disease." N Engl J Med 309 (1983): 21-4
  14. Pang S, Clark AT, Freeman LC, Dolan LM, Immken L, Mueller OT, Stiff D, Shulman DI "Maternal side effects of prenatal dexamethasone therapy for fetal congenital adrenal hyperplasia." J Clin Endocrinol Metab 75 (1992): 249-53
  15. "Product Information. Hydrocortone (hydrocortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  16. "Product Information. Hydeltrasol (prednisolone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  17. Swartz SL, Dluhy RG "Corticosteroids: clinical pharmacology and therapeutic use." Drugs 16 (1978): 238-55
  18. "Product Information. Cortone Acetate (cortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  19. Chrousos GA, Kattah JC, Beck RW, Cleary PA "Side effects of glucocorticoid treatment. Experience of the Optic Neuritis Treatment Trial." JAMA 269 (1993): 2110-2
  20. Allan SG, Leonard RC "Dexamethasone antiemesis and side-effects." Lancet 1 (1986): 1035
  21. "Product Information. Deltasone (prednisone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
View all 21 references
Major

Corticosteroids (Includes Celestone Phosphate) ↔ Scleroderma

Severe Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Systemic Sclerosis

In patients with scleroderma, corticosteroids may precipitate renal crisis with malignant hypertension, possibly via steroid-induced increases in renin substrate and angiotensin II levels and decreases in vasodilator prostaglandin production. Renal failure may ensue. Therapy with corticosteroids should be administered cautiously in patients with scleroderma. In addition, they should be limited to short-term use.

References

  1. "Product Information. Decadron (dexamethasone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  2. "Product Information. Deltasone (prednisone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  3. "Product Information. Celestone (betamethasone)." Schering Corporation, Kenilworth, NJ.
  4. "Product Information. Florinef Acetate (fludrocortisone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  5. "Product Information. Medrol (methylprednisolone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  6. "Product Information. Kenalog (triamcinolone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  7. "Product Information. Hydeltrasol (prednisolone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  8. "Product Information. Cortone Acetate (cortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  9. "Product Information. Hydrocortone (hydrocortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  10. Fauci AS, Braunwald E, Isselbacher KJ, Wilson JD, Martin JB, Kasper DL, Hauser SL, Longo DL, eds. "Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine. 14th ed." New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Health Professionals Division (1998):
View all 10 references
Major

Corticosteroids (Includes Celestone Phosphate) ↔ Strongyloidiasis

Severe Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Strongyloidiasis

Unlike most helminths, Strongyloides stercoralis has the ability to replicate in the human host. In patients with strongyloidiasis, the use of pharmacologic or immunosuppressive dosages of corticosteroids may result in Strongyloides hyperinfection and dissemination with widespread larval migration, often accompanied by severe enterocolitis and potentially fatal gram-negative septicemia. Therapy with corticosteroids should be administered with extreme caution, if at all, in these patients.

References

  1. "Product Information. Cortone Acetate (cortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  2. "Product Information. Decadron (dexamethasone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  3. "Product Information. Hydrocortone (hydrocortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  4. "Product Information. Medrol (methylprednisolone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  5. "Product Information. Deltasone (prednisone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  6. "Product Information. Celestone (betamethasone)." Schering Corporation, Kenilworth, NJ.
  7. Fauci AS, Braunwald E, Isselbacher KJ, Wilson JD, Martin JB, Kasper DL, Hauser SL, Longo DL, eds. "Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine. 14th ed." New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Health Professionals Division (1998):
  8. "Product Information. Florinef Acetate (fludrocortisone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  9. "Product Information. Kenalog (triamcinolone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  10. Swartz SL, Dluhy RG "Corticosteroids: clinical pharmacology and therapeutic use." Drugs 16 (1978): 238-55
  11. "Product Information. Hydeltrasol (prednisolone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
View all 11 references
Major

Corticosteroids (Includes Celestone Phosphate) ↔ Vaccination

Severe Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Vaccination

The administration of live or live attenuated vaccines is contraindicated in patients receiving large or immunosuppressive doses of corticosteroids. Inactivated viral or bacterial vaccines should be used with caution, since their administration may pose a risk of neurological complications in these patients. Additionally, a diminished or inadequate serum antibody response may be anticipated. Immunization may be undertaken in patients receiving corticosteroids as replacement therapy, such as for Addison's disease.

References

  1. "Product Information. Kenalog (triamcinolone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  2. "Product Information. Florinef Acetate (fludrocortisone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  3. "Product Information. Hydeltrasol (prednisolone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  4. Swartz SL, Dluhy RG "Corticosteroids: clinical pharmacology and therapeutic use." Drugs 16 (1978): 238-55
  5. "Product Information. Hydrocortone (hydrocortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  6. "Product Information. Cortone Acetate (cortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  7. "Product Information. Decadron (dexamethasone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  8. "Product Information. Medrol (methylprednisolone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  9. "Product Information. Celestone (betamethasone)." Schering Corporation, Kenilworth, NJ.
  10. "Product Information. Deltasone (prednisone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
View all 10 references
Moderate

Corticosteroids (Includes Celestone Phosphate) ↔ Cirrhosis

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Cirrhosis

Corticosteroids may have enhanced effects on patients with cirrhosis due to decreased metabolism of these agents. Patients with cirrhosis should be monitored more closely for excessive cortisol effects. Dosage adjustments may be required in these patients.

Moderate

Corticosteroids (Includes Celestone Phosphate) ↔ Depression/Psychoses

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Depression, Psychosis

Corticosteroids may aggravate the symptoms of psychosis and emotional instability. Patients with these conditions should be monitored for increased or worsened symptoms during corticosteroid therapy.

References

  1. "Product Information. Hydrocortone (hydrocortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  2. Swartz SL, Dluhy RG "Corticosteroids: clinical pharmacology and therapeutic use." Drugs 16 (1978): 238-55
  3. Chrousos GA, Kattah JC, Beck RW, Cleary PA "Side effects of glucocorticoid treatment. Experience of the Optic Neuritis Treatment Trial." JAMA 269 (1993): 2110-2
  4. "Product Information. Cortone Acetate (cortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  5. Sechi GP, Piras MR, Demurtas A, Tanca S, Rosati G "Dexamethasone-induced schizoaffective-like state in multiple sclerosis: prophylaxis and treatment with carbamazepine." Clin Neuropharmacol 10 (1987): 453-7
  6. "Product Information. Decadron (dexamethasone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  7. Campbell IA "Aggressive psychosis in AIDS patient on high-dose steroids." Lancet 2 (1987): 750-1
  8. "Product Information. Deltasone (prednisone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  9. Seale JP, Compton MR "Side-effects of corticosteroid agents." Med J Aust 144 (1986): 139-42
  10. Goldstein ET, Preskorn SH "Mania triggered by a steroid nasal spray in a patient with stable bipolar disorder." Am J Psychiatry 146 (1989): 1076-7
  11. "Product Information. Medrol (methylprednisolone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  12. Baethge BA, Lidsky MD, Goldberg JW "A study of adverse effects of high-dose intravenous (pulse) methylprednisolone therapy in patients with rheumatic disease." Ann Pharmacother 26 (1992): 316-20
  13. Pies R "Persistent bipolar illness after steroid administration." Arch Intern Med 141 (1981): 1087
  14. Travlos A, Hirsch G "Steroid psychosis: a cause of confusion on the acute spinal cord injury unit." Arch Phys Med Rehabil 74 (1993): 312-5
  15. Alpert E, Seigerman C "Steroid withdrawal psychosis in a patient with closed head injury." Arch Phys Med Rehabil 67 (1986): 766-9
  16. "Product Information. Celestone (betamethasone)." Schering Corporation, Kenilworth, NJ.
  17. Kaufmann M, Kahaner K, Peselow ED, Gershon S "Steroid psychoses: case report and brief overview." J Clin Psychiatry 43 (1982): 75-6
  18. Raskin DE "Steroid-induced panic disorder." Am J Psychiatry 141 (1984): 1647
  19. Phelan MC "Beclomethasone mania." Br J Psychiatry 155 (1989): 871-2
  20. "Product Information. Kenalog (triamcinolone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  21. "Product Information. Hydeltrasol (prednisolone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  22. Swinburn CR, Wakefield JM, Newman SP, Jones PW "Evidence of prednisolone induced mood change ('steroid euphoria') in patients with chronic obstructive airways disease." Br J Clin Pharmacol 26 (1988): 709-13
  23. d'Orban PT "Steroid-induced psychosis." Lancet 2 (1989): 694
  24. Perry PJ, Tsuang MT, Hwang MH "Prednisolone psychosis: clinical observations." Drug Intell Clin Pharm 18 (1984): 603-9
  25. Klein JF "Adverse psychiatric effects of systemic glucocorticoid therapy." Am Fam Physician 46 (1992): 1469-74
  26. "Product Information. Florinef Acetate (fludrocortisone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  27. Greeves JA "Rapid-onset steroid psychosis with very low dosage of prednisolone." Lancet 05/19/84 (1984): 1119-20
View all 27 references
Moderate

Corticosteroids (Includes Celestone Phosphate) ↔ Diabetes

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Diabetes Mellitus, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

Corticosteroids can raise blood glucose level by antagonizing the action and suppressing the secretion of insulin, which results in inhibition of peripheral glucose uptake and increased gluconeogenesis. Therapy with corticosteroids should be administered cautiously in patients with diabetes mellitus, glucose intolerance, or a predisposition to hyperglycemia. Patients with diabetes mellitus should be monitored more closely during corticosteroid therapy, and their antidiabetic regimen adjusted accordingly.

References

  1. "Product Information. Celestone (betamethasone)." Schering Corporation, Kenilworth, NJ.
  2. Black DM, Filak AT "Hyperglycemia with non-insulin-dependent diabetes following intraarticular steroid injection." J Fam Pract 28 (1989): 462-3
  3. Gunnarsson R, Lundgren G, Magnusson G, Ost L, Groth CG "Steroid diabetes--a sign of overtreatment with steroids in the renal graft recipient?" Scand J Urol Nephrol Suppl 54 (1980): 135-8
  4. Fauci AS, Braunwald E, Isselbacher KJ, Wilson JD, Martin JB, Kasper DL, Hauser SL, Longo DL, eds. "Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine. 14th ed." New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Health Professionals Division (1998):
  5. Ludvik B, Clodi M, Kautzky-Willer A, Capek M, Hartter E, Pacini G, Prager R "Effect of dexamethasone on insulin sensitivity, islet amyloid polypeptide and insulin secretion in humans." Diabetologia 36 (1993): 84-7
  6. "Product Information. Kenalog (triamcinolone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  7. Greenstone MA, Shaw AB "Alternate day corticosteroid causes alternate day hyperglycaemia." Postgrad Med J 63 (1987): 761-4
  8. Lieberman P, Patterson R, Kunske R "Complications of long-term steroid therapy for asthma." J Allergy Clin Immunol 49 (1972): 329-36
  9. "Product Information. Hydeltrasol (prednisolone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  10. "Product Information. Hydrocortone (hydrocortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  11. "Product Information. Florinef Acetate (fludrocortisone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  12. "Product Information. Cortone Acetate (cortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  13. "Product Information. Decadron (dexamethasone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  14. Seale JP, Compton MR "Side-effects of corticosteroid agents." Med J Aust 144 (1986): 139-42
  15. "Product Information. Medrol (methylprednisolone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  16. Allan SG, Leonard RC "Dexamethasone antiemesis and side-effects." Lancet 1 (1986): 1035
  17. "Product Information. Deltasone (prednisone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
View all 17 references
Moderate

Corticosteroids (Includes Celestone Phosphate) ↔ Fluid Retention

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Congestive Heart Failure, Fluid Retention, Hypertension, Renal Dysfunction

Corticosteroids may cause hypernatremia, hypokalemia, fluid retention, and elevation in blood pressure. These mineralocorticoid effects are most significant with fludrocortisone, followed by hydrocortisone and cortisone, then by prednisone and prednisolone. The remaining corticosteroids, betamethasone, dexamethasone, methylprednisolone, and triamcinolone, have little mineralocorticoid activities. However, large doses of any corticosteroid can demonstrate these effects, particularly if given for longer than brief periods. Therapy with corticosteroids should be administered cautiously in patients with preexisting fluid retention, hypertension, congestive heart failure, and/or renal dysfunction. Dietary sodium restriction and potassium supplementation may be advisable.

References

  1. Klepikov PV, Kutyrina IM, Tareyeva IE "Steroid-induced hypertension in patients with nephrotic syndrome." Nephron 48 (1988): 286-90
  2. "Product Information. Kenalog (triamcinolone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  3. Pang S, Clark AT, Freeman LC, Dolan LM, Immken L, Mueller OT, Stiff D, Shulman DI "Maternal side effects of prenatal dexamethasone therapy for fetal congenital adrenal hyperplasia." J Clin Endocrinol Metab 75 (1992): 249-53
  4. Jackson SH, Beevers DG, Myers K "Does long-term low-dose corticosteroid therapy cause hypertension?" Clin Sci 61 (1981): s381-3
  5. Lieberman P, Patterson R, Kunske R "Complications of long-term steroid therapy for asthma." J Allergy Clin Immunol 49 (1972): 329-36
  6. "Product Information. Hydeltrasol (prednisolone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  7. "Product Information. Hydrocortone (hydrocortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  8. "Product Information. Cortone Acetate (cortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  9. Swartz SL, Dluhy RG "Corticosteroids: clinical pharmacology and therapeutic use." Drugs 16 (1978): 238-55
  10. Seale JP, Compton MR "Side-effects of corticosteroid agents." Med J Aust 144 (1986): 139-42
  11. "Product Information. Deltasone (prednisone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  12. Baethge BA, Lidsky MD, Goldberg JW "A study of adverse effects of high-dose intravenous (pulse) methylprednisolone therapy in patients with rheumatic disease." Ann Pharmacother 26 (1992): 316-20
  13. "Product Information. Florinef Acetate (fludrocortisone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  14. Thomas TP "The complications of systemic corticosteroid therapy in the elderly." Gerontology 30 (1984): 60-5
  15. "Product Information. Decadron (dexamethasone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  16. "Product Information. Medrol (methylprednisolone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  17. "Product Information. Celestone (betamethasone)." Schering Corporation, Kenilworth, NJ.
  18. Ramsahoye BH, Davies SV, el-Gaylani N, Sandeman D, Scanlon MF "The mineralocorticoid effects of high dose hydrocortisone." BMJ 310 (1995): 656-7
View all 18 references
Moderate

Corticosteroids (Includes Celestone Phosphate) ↔ Hyperadrenocorticalism

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Hyperadrenocorticism, Hyperaldosteronism, Adrenal Tumor

Corticosteroids mimic the effects of endogenous cortisol and aldosterone. The use of these agents may aggravate conditions of hyperadrenocorticalism in a dose-dependent manner.

References

  1. "Product Information. Kenalog (triamcinolone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  2. Lieberman P, Patterson R, Kunske R "Complications of long-term steroid therapy for asthma." J Allergy Clin Immunol 49 (1972): 329-36
  3. "Product Information. Hydeltrasol (prednisolone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  4. Swartz SL, Dluhy RG "Corticosteroids: clinical pharmacology and therapeutic use." Drugs 16 (1978): 238-55
  5. "Product Information. Hydrocortone (hydrocortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  6. "Product Information. Cortone Acetate (cortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  7. Seale JP, Compton MR "Side-effects of corticosteroid agents." Med J Aust 144 (1986): 139-42
  8. "Product Information. Decadron (dexamethasone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  9. "Product Information. Deltasone (prednisone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  10. Tsuruoka S, Sugimoto K, Fujimura A "Drug-induced Cushing syndrome in a patient with ulcerative colitis after betamethasone enema: Evaluation of plasma drug concentration." Ther Drug Monit 20 (1998): 387-9
  11. "Product Information. Medrol (methylprednisolone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  12. "Product Information. Celestone (betamethasone)." Schering Corporation, Kenilworth, NJ.
  13. "Product Information. Florinef Acetate (fludrocortisone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  14. Kimmerle R, Rolla AR "Iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome due to dexamethasone nasal drops." Am J Med 79 (1985): 535-7
View all 14 references
Moderate

Corticosteroids (Includes Celestone Phosphate) ↔ Hyperlipidemia

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Hyperlipidemia

Corticosteroids may elevate serum triglyceride and LDL cholesterol levels if used for longer than brief periods. Patients with preexisting hyperlipidemia may require closer monitoring during prolonged corticosteroid therapy, and adjustments made accordingly in their lipid-lowering regimen.

References

  1. "Product Information. Florinef Acetate (fludrocortisone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  2. "Product Information. Kenalog (triamcinolone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  3. "Product Information. Hydeltrasol (prednisolone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  4. "Product Information. Hydrocortone (hydrocortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  5. "Product Information. Decadron (dexamethasone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  6. "Product Information. Cortone Acetate (cortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  7. "Product Information. Deltasone (prednisone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  8. "Product Information. Celestone (betamethasone)." Schering Corporation, Kenilworth, NJ.
  9. Seale JP, Compton MR "Side-effects of corticosteroid agents." Med J Aust 144 (1986): 139-42
  10. "Product Information. Medrol (methylprednisolone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
View all 10 references
Moderate

Corticosteroids (Includes Celestone Phosphate) ↔ Hypothyroidism

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Hypothyroidism

Corticosteroids may have enhanced effects in hypothyroidism due to decreased metabolism of these agents. Patients with hypothyroidism should be monitored more closely for excessive cortisol effects. Dosage adjustments may be required secondary to changes in their thyroid condition.

References

  1. "Product Information. Celestone (betamethasone)." Schering Corporation, Kenilworth, NJ.
  2. "Product Information. Kenalog (triamcinolone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  3. "Product Information. Medrol (methylprednisolone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  4. "Product Information. Florinef Acetate (fludrocortisone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  5. "Product Information. Cortone Acetate (cortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  6. "Product Information. Hydrocortone (hydrocortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  7. "Product Information. Deltasone (prednisone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  8. O'Connor P, Feely J "Clinical pharmacokinetics and endocrine disorders. Therapeutic implications." Clin Pharmacokinet 13 (1987): 345-64
  9. "Product Information. Hydeltrasol (prednisolone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  10. "Product Information. Decadron (dexamethasone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
View all 10 references
Moderate

Corticosteroids (Includes Celestone Phosphate) ↔ Liver Disease

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Liver Disease

Corticosteroids are primarily metabolized by the liver and may have enhanced effects in patients with liver disease. Dosage adjustments may be necessary in these patients.

References

  1. "Product Information. Medrol (methylprednisolone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  2. "Product Information. Deltasone (prednisone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  3. "Product Information. Celestone (betamethasone)." Schering Corporation, Kenilworth, NJ.
  4. "Product Information. Hydeltrasol (prednisolone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  5. "Product Information. Kenalog (triamcinolone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  6. "Product Information. Decadron (dexamethasone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  7. "Product Information. Hydrocortone (hydrocortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  8. Cunliffe WJ, Burton JL, Holti G, Wright V "Hazards of steroid therapy in hepatic failure." Br J Dermatol 93 (1975): 183-5
  9. "Product Information. Cortone Acetate (cortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  10. "Product Information. Florinef Acetate (fludrocortisone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
View all 10 references
Moderate

Corticosteroids (Includes Celestone Phosphate) ↔ Myasthenia Gravis

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Myasthenia Gravis

Although corticosteroids are commonly used in the treatment of myasthenia gravis to increase muscle strength, these agents should nevertheless be administered with caution in such setting. Patients should be treated in an intensive care unit and receive respiratory support, since muscle strength may markedly decrease initially, particularly with high dosages. Preferably, therapy should begin with relatively low dosages (15 to 25 mg/day of prednisone or equivalent) and be increased stepwise as tolerated (approximately 5 mg/day of prednisone or equivalent at 2- to 3-day intervals until marked clinical improvement or a dosage of 50 mg/day is reached). Improvement may be delayed and gradual. Thus, it is important not to discontinue therapy prematurely.

References

  1. Fauci AS, Braunwald E, Isselbacher KJ, Wilson JD, Martin JB, Kasper DL, Hauser SL, Longo DL, eds. "Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine. 14th ed." New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Health Professionals Division (1998):
Moderate

Corticosteroids (Includes Celestone Phosphate) ↔ Myopathy

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Myoneural Disorder, Myopathy

Toxic myopathy has been observed with the chronic use or the administration of large doses of corticosteroids, often in patients with disorders of neuromuscular transmission such as myasthenia gravis or in patients receiving neuromuscular blocking agents. Fluorinated corticosteroids such as betamethasone, dexamethasone, and triamcinolone appear to cause more severe muscle atrophy and weakness than the nonfluorinated agents. Moreover, multiple-daily doses are more toxic than once-daily or, preferably, alternate-day morning doses. Steroid myopathy is generalized and sometimes accompanied by respiratory weakness and dyspnea. In some cases, it has resulted in quadriparesis. Elevations of creatine kinase may also occur, albeit infrequently. After withdrawal of corticosteroid therapy, recovery may be slow and incomplete. Therapy with corticosteroids should be administered cautiously in patients with preexisting myopathy or myoneural disorders, since these conditions may confound the diagnosis of steroid-induced myopathy. The presence of a normal serum CK level, minimal or no changes of myopathy on EMG, and type 2 muscle fiber atrophy on biopsy are helpful in suggesting steroid-induced weakness. If steroid myopathy is suspected, a dosage reduction or discontinuation of the steroid should be considered.

References

  1. "Product Information. Decadron (dexamethasone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  2. Seale JP, Compton MR "Side-effects of corticosteroid agents." Med J Aust 144 (1986): 139-42
  3. "Product Information. Medrol (methylprednisolone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  4. "Product Information. Deltasone (prednisone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  5. Decramer M, Stas KJ "Corticosteroid-induced myopathy involving respiratory muscles in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or asthma." Am Rev Respir Dis 146 (1992): 800-2
  6. "Product Information. Kenalog (triamcinolone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  7. "Product Information. Florinef Acetate (fludrocortisone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  8. Dropcho EJ, Soong SJ "Steroid-induced weakness in patients with primary brain tumors." Neurology 41 (1991): 1235-9
  9. Powell JR "Steroid and hypokalemic myopathy after corticosteroids for ulcerative colitis. Systemic and tropical application." Am J Gastroenterol 52 (1969): 425-32
  10. "Product Information. Hydeltrasol (prednisolone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  11. "Product Information. Celestone (betamethasone)." Schering Corporation, Kenilworth, NJ.
  12. Ojeda VJ "Necrotizing myopathy associated with steroid therapy. Report of two cases." Pathology 14 (1982): 435-8
  13. Pacy PJ, Halliday D "Muscle protein synthesis in steroid-induced proximal myopathy: a case report." Muscle Nerve 12 (1989): 378-81
  14. "Product Information. Hydrocortone (hydrocortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  15. "Product Information. Cortone Acetate (cortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  16. Fauci AS, Braunwald E, Isselbacher KJ, Wilson JD, Martin JB, Kasper DL, Hauser SL, Longo DL, eds. "Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine. 14th ed." New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Health Professionals Division (1998):
  17. Hardman JG, Gilman AG, Limbird LE eds. "Goodman and Gilman's the Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics. 9th ed." New York, NY: McGraw-Hill (1995):
  18. Bowyer SL, LaMothe MP, Hollister JR "Steroid myopathy: incidence and detection in a population with asthma." J Allergy Clin Immunol 76 (1985): 234-42
  19. Weissman DE, Dufer D, Vogel V, Abeloff MD "Corticosteroid toxicity in neuro-oncology patients." J Neurooncol 5 (1987): 125-8
View all 19 references
Moderate

Corticosteroids (Includes Celestone Phosphate) ↔ Ocular Toxicities

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Glaucoma/Intraocular Hypertension, Cataracts

Prolonged use of corticosteroids may cause posterior subcapsular cataracts and elevated intraocular pressure, the latter of which may lead to glaucoma and/or damage to the optic nerves. Long-term therapy with corticosteroids should be administered cautiously in patients with a history of cataracts, glaucoma, or increased intraocular pressure.

References

  1. Kobayashi Y, Akaishi K, Nishio T, Kobayashi Y, Kimura Y "Posterior subcapsular cataract in nephrotic children receiving steroid therapy." Am J Dis Child 128 (1974): 671-3
  2. "Product Information. Decadron (dexamethasone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  3. Francois J "Corticosteroid glaucoma." Ann Ophthalmol 9 (1977): 1075-80
  4. "Product Information. Cortone Acetate (cortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  5. Seale JP, Compton MR "Side-effects of corticosteroid agents." Med J Aust 144 (1986): 139-42
  6. "Product Information. Medrol (methylprednisolone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  7. Debnath SC, Abomelha MS, Jawdat M, et al "Ocular side effects of systemic steroid therapy in renal transplant patients." Ann Ophthalmol 19 (1987): 435-7
  8. "Product Information. Celestone (betamethasone)." Schering Corporation, Kenilworth, NJ.
  9. "Product Information. Deltasone (prednisone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  10. McDonnell PJ, Kerr Muir MG "Glaucoma associated with systemic corticosteroid therapy." Lancet 08/17/85 (1985): 386-7
  11. "Product Information. Kenalog (triamcinolone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  12. Thomas TP "The complications of systemic corticosteroid therapy in the elderly." Gerontology 30 (1984): 60-5
  13. "Product Information. Hydeltrasol (prednisolone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  14. Swartz SL, Dluhy RG "Corticosteroids: clinical pharmacology and therapeutic use." Drugs 16 (1978): 238-55
  15. "Product Information. Hydrocortone (hydrocortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  16. Kitazawa Y "Increased intraocular pressure induced by corticosteroids." Am J Ophthalmol 82 (1976): 492-5
  17. Bluming AZ, Zeegen P "Cataracts induced by intermittent Decadron used as an antiemetic." J Clin Oncol 4 (1986): 221-3
  18. Godel V, Regenbogen L, Stein R "On the mechanism of corticosteroid-induced ocular hypertension." Ann Ophthalmol 10 (1978): 191-6
  19. "Product Information. Florinef Acetate (fludrocortisone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
View all 19 references
Moderate

Corticosteroids (Includes Celestone Phosphate) ↔ Osteoporosis

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Osteoporosis

Corticosteroids reduce osteoblastic function and inhibit the absorption of intestinal calcium, which can result in bone resorption and bone loss during prolonged therapy. In addition, bone matrix may be affected by the protein-catabolic effects of corticosteroids, especially when given in high dosages or for prolonged periods, leading to aseptic necrosis and fractures. Long-term or high-dose corticosteroid therapy should be administered cautiously and only if necessary in patients with or at risk for osteoporosis. Adverse skeletal effects may be minimized by alternate-day or intermittent administration. Any patient receiving prolonged therapy with the equivalent of 7.5 mg prednisone/day or more are at risk for glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis and should be managed according to The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) guidelines.

References

  1. Goldstein MF, Fallon JJ, Harning R "Chronic glucocorticoid therapy-induced osteoporosis in patients with obstructive lung disease." Chest 116 (1999): 1733-49
  2. Anderton JM, Helm R "Multiple joint osteonecrosis following short-term steroid therapy. Case report." J Bone Joint Surg Am 64 (1982): 139-41
  3. "Product Information. Decadron (dexamethasone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  4. "Product Information. Deltasone (prednisone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  5. Seale JP, Compton MR "Side-effects of corticosteroid agents." Med J Aust 144 (1986): 139-42
  6. Hahn TJ, Halstead LR, Baran DT "Effects of short term glucocorticoid administration on intestinal calcium absorption and circulating vitamin d metabolite concentrations in man." J Clin Endocrinol Metab 52 (1981): 111-5
  7. Packe GE, Douglas JG, McDonald AF, Robins SP, Reid DM "Bone density in asthmatic patients taking high dose inhaled beclomethasone diproprionate and intermittent systemic corticosteroids." Thorax 47 (1992): 414-7
  8. Rizzato G, Montemurro L "Reversibility of exogenous corticosteroid-induced bone loss." Eur Respir J 6 (1993): 116-9
  9. "Product Information. Celestone (betamethasone)." Schering Corporation, Kenilworth, NJ.
  10. Fordyce MJ, Solomon L "Early detection of avascular necrosis of the femoral head by MRI." J Bone Joint Surg Br 75 (1993): 365-7
  11. Taylor LJ "Multifocal avascular necrosis after short-term high-dose steroid therapy. A report of three cases." J Bone Joint Surg Br 66 (1984): 431-3
  12. "Product Information. Medrol (methylprednisolone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  13. Fast A, Alon M, Weiss S, Zer-Aviv FR "Avascular necrosis of bone following short-term dexamethasone therapy for brain edema. Case report." J Neurosurg 61 (1984): 983-5
  14. "Product Information. Florinef Acetate (fludrocortisone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  15. Thomas TP "The complications of systemic corticosteroid therapy in the elderly." Gerontology 30 (1984): 60-5
  16. Ledford D, Apter A, Brenner AM, Rubin K, Prestwood K, Frieri M, Lukert B "Osteoporosis in the corticosteroid-treated patient with asthma." J Allergy Clin Immunol 102 (1998): 353-62
  17. Elliott ME, Farrah RM, Binkley NC, Cames ML, Gudmundsson A "Management of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis in male veterans." Ann Pharmacother 34 (2000): 1380-4
  18. "Product Information. Kenalog (triamcinolone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  19. McCluskey J, Gutteridge DH "Avascular necrosis of bone after high doses of dexamethasone during neurosurgery." Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 284 (1982): 333-4
  20. Saisu T, Sakamoto K, Yamada K, Kashiwabara H, Yokoyama T, Iida S, Harada Y, Ikenoue S, Sakamoto M, Moriya H "High incidence of osteonecrosis of femoral head in patients receiving more than 2 g of intravenous methylprednisolone after renal transplantation." Transplant Proc 28 (1996): 1559-60
  21. Mizuta H, Kubota K, Shiraishi M, Kai K, Nakamura E, Takagi K "Steroid-related bilateral osteonecrosis of the patella." Arthroscopy 9 (1993): 114-6
  22. Black KA, Khangure MS, Owen ET "Dexamethasone and osteonecrosis." Aust N Z J Med 11 (1981): 521-5
  23. Weissman DE, Dufer D, Vogel V, Abeloff MD "Corticosteroid toxicity in neuro-oncology patients." J Neurooncol 5 (1987): 125-8
  24. "Product Information. Hydrocortone (hydrocortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  25. Marystone JF, Barrettconnor EL, Morton DJ "Inhaled and oral corticosteroids: their effects on bone mineral density in older adults." Am J Public Health 85 (1995): 1693-5
  26. "Product Information. Hydeltrasol (prednisolone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  27. Need AG, Philcox JC, Hartley TF, Nordin BE "Calcium metabolism and osteoporosis in cortiscosteroid-treated postmenopausal women." Aust N Z J Med 16 (1986): 341-6
  28. Cruess RL "Experience with steroid-induced avascular necrosis of the shoulder and etiologic considerations regarding osteonecrosis of the hip." Clin Orthop Jan-Feb(13 (1978): 86-93
  29. Williams IA, Mitchell AD, Rothman W, Tallett P, Williams K, Pitt P "Survey of the long term incidence of osteonecrosis of the hip and adverse medical events in rheumatoid arthritis after high dose intravenous methylprednisolone." Ann Rheum Dis 47 (1988): 930-3
  30. Sambrook PN, Hassall JE, York JR "Osteonecrosis after high dosage, short term corticosteroid therapy." J Rheumatol 11 (1984): 514-6
  31. Fentiman IS, Saad Z, Caleffi M, et al "Tamoxifen protects against steroid-induced bone loss." Eur J Cancer 28 (1992): 684-5
  32. "Product Information. Cortone Acetate (cortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  33. Fauci AS, Braunwald E, Isselbacher KJ, Wilson JD, Martin JB, Kasper DL, Hauser SL, Longo DL, eds. "Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine. 14th ed." New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Health Professionals Division (1998):
  34. Archer AG, Nelson MC, Abbondanzo SL, Bogumill GP "Case report 554: Osteonecrosis at multiple sites as noted." Skeletal Radiol 18 (1989): 380-4
  35. Mitchison HC, Bassendine MF, Malcolm AJ, et al "A pilot, double-blind, controlled 1-year trial of prednisolone treatment in primary biliary cirrhosis: hepatic improvement but greater bone loss." Hepatology 10 (1989): 420-9
  36. Bijlsma JW, Duursma SA, Bosch R, Raymakers JA, Huber-Bruning O "Acute changes in calcium and bone metabolism during methylprednisolone pulse therapy in rheumatoid arthritis." Br J Rheumatol 27 (1988): 215-9
View all 36 references
Moderate

Corticosteroids (Includes Celestone Phosphate) ↔ Thromboembolism

Moderate Potential Hazard, Low plausibility

Applies to: Thrombotic/Thromboembolic Disorder, History - Thrombotic/Thromboembolic Disorder

Corticosteroids may increase blood coagulability and have rarely been associated with the development of intravascular thrombosis, thromboembolism, and thrombophlebitis. Therapy with corticosteroids should be administered cautiously in patients with thrombotic or thromboembolic disorders.

References

  1. "Product Information. Kenalog (triamcinolone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  2. "Product Information. Hydeltrasol (prednisolone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  3. "Product Information. Florinef Acetate (fludrocortisone)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  4. Wadman B, Werner I "Thromboembolic complications during corticosteroid treatment of temporal arteritis." Lancet 1 (1972): 907
  5. "Product Information. Deltasone (prednisone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  6. "Product Information. Hydrocortone (hydrocortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  7. "Product Information. Cortone Acetate (cortisone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  8. "Product Information. Decadron (dexamethasone)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  9. "Product Information. Celestone (betamethasone)." Schering Corporation, Kenilworth, NJ.
  10. "Product Information. Medrol (methylprednisolone)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
View all 10 references

Celestone Phosphate (betamethasone) drug Interactions

There are 751 drug interactions with Celestone Phosphate (betamethasone)

Celestone Phosphate (betamethasone) alcohol/food Interactions

There are 2 alcohol/food interactions with Celestone Phosphate (betamethasone)

Drug Interaction Classification

The classifications below are a general guideline only. It is difficult to determine the relevance of a particular drug interaction to any individual given the large number of variables.
Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.
Unknown No information available.

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider.

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