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Pseudogout

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW:

Pseudogout is a type of arthritis. It is also called calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPDD). Pseudogout causes calcium crystals to form in cartilage and collect in fluid called synovial fluid that surrounds joints. The crystals damage the cartilage and can cause swelling that leads to pain in the joint. This is called a flare. Pseudogout usually affects large joints, such as in the knee.

DISCHARGE INSTRUCTIONS:

Medicines:

  • NSAIDs , such as ibuprofen, help decrease swelling, pain, and fever. This medicine is available with or without a doctor's order. NSAIDs can cause stomach bleeding or kidney problems in certain people. If you take blood thinner medicine, always ask your healthcare provider if NSAIDs are safe for you. Always read the medicine label and follow directions.
  • Steroid medicine may be prescribed to reduce severe swelling.
  • Antigout medicine may be given to prevent gout attacks.
  • Take your medicine as directed. Call your healthcare provider if you think your medicine is not helping or if you have side effects. Tell him if you are allergic to any medicine. Keep a list of the medicines, vitamins, and herbs you take. Include the amounts, and when and why you take them. Bring the list or the pill bottles to follow-up visits. Carry your medicine list with you in case of an emergency.

Return to the emergency department if:

  • You have severe joint pain that you cannot tolerate.
  • You have a fever or redness that spreads beyond the joint area.
  • Your joint pain and swelling do not go away, even after treatment.

Contact your healthcare provider if:

  • You have new symptoms, such as a rash, after you start treatment.
  • You have questions or concerns about your condition or care.

Follow up with your healthcare provider or rheumatologist as directed:

Write down your questions so you remember to ask them during your visits.

Manage pseudogout:

  • Rest your painful joint so it can heal. Your healthcare provider may recommend crutches or a walker if the affected joint is in a leg.
  • Apply ice to your joint. Ice decreases pain and swelling. Use an ice pack, or put crushed ice in a plastic bag. Cover the ice pack or bag with a towel and apply it to your painful joint for 15 to 20 minutes every hour, or as directed.
  • Elevate your joint. Elevation helps reduce swelling and pain. Raise your joint above the level of your heart as often as you can. Prop your painful joint on pillows to keep it above your heart comfortably.
  • Go to physical or occupational therapy as directed. A physical therapist can teach you exercises to improve flexibility and range of motion. You may also be shown non-weight-bearing exercises that are safe for your joints, such as swimming. Exercise can help keep your joints flexible and reduce pain. An occupational therapist can help you learn to do your daily activities when your joints are stiff or sore.
  • Drink liquids as directed. Liquids help prevent dehydration. Ask how much liquid to drink each day and which liquids are best for you.

© 2016 Truven Health Analytics Inc. Information is for End User's use only and may not be sold, redistributed or otherwise used for commercial purposes. All illustrations and images included in CareNotes® are the copyrighted property of A.D.A.M., Inc. or Truven Health Analytics.

The above information is an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatments. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before following any medical regimen to see if it is safe and effective for you.

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