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Carotid Artery Stent Insertion

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW:

Carotid artery stent insertion is a surgery to widen a narrowed carotid artery. A stent is a small cylinder-shaped tube that widens a blood vessel. The carotid artery is a large blood vessel found in your neck that carries blood and oxygen to your brain.


DISCHARGE INSTRUCTIONS:

Medicines:

  • Antiplatelets , such as aspirin, help prevent blood clots. Take your antiplatelet medicine exactly as directed. These medicines make it more likely for you to bleed or bruise. If you are told to take aspirin, do not take acetaminophen or ibuprofen instead.
  • Pain medicine: You may be given a prescription medicine to decrease pain. Do not wait until the pain is severe before you take this medicine.
  • Take your medicine as directed. Contact your healthcare provider if you think your medicine is not helping or if you have side effects. Tell him or her if you are allergic to any medicine. Keep a list of the medicines, vitamins, and herbs you take. Include the amounts, and when and why you take them. Bring the list or the pill bottles to follow-up visits. Carry your medicine list with you in case of an emergency.

Follow up with your healthcare provider as directed:

If you need an MRI, wait at least 6 to 8 weeks after stent placement, or as directed. Write down your questions so you remember to ask them during your visits.

Contact your healthcare provider if:

  • You have a fever.
  • You have chills or a cough, or you feel weak and achy.
  • Your skin is itchy, swollen, or has a rash.
  • You have questions or concerns about your condition or care.

Seek care immediately or call 911 if:

  • You have bleeding, increased bruising, or swelling where the catheter was inserted.
  • You are dizzy, weak, confused, or faint.
  • You lose feeling in a part of your body.
  • You suddenly feel lightheaded and short of breath.
  • You have chest pain when you take a deep breath or cough.
  • You cough up blood.
  • Your arm or leg feels warm, tender, and painful. It may look swollen and red.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

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