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Zika Virus Infection News

Related terms: Zika Fever, Zika Disease, Zika

Impaired Eyesight May Be First Sign of Zika Damage in Babies

Posted 8 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 17, 2017 – Infants exposed to the Zika virus in the womb should have their eyes examined for possible virus-related abnormalities, according to a new report. "All infants with potential Zika virus exposure should undergo screening eye examinations regardless of [central nervous system] abnormalities, timing of maternal infection during pregnancy, or laboratory confirmation," said Dr. Andrea Zin and colleagues. Zin is with the National Institute of Women's Health in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. In some cases, evidence of Zika infection may only show up in the eyes, the study found. The results were published July 17 in the journal JAMA Pediatrics. "Eye abnormalities may be the only initial finding in congenital Zika virus infection," Zin said in a journal news release. Zika, a mosquito-borne virus, usually causes only mild symptoms in healthy adults. But fetal exposure during ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Eye Conditions, Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Hydrocephalus, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Visual Defect/Disturbance, Zika Virus Infection

Experimental Vaccines Might Shield Fetus From Zika

Posted 13 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 13, 2017 – Two experimental vaccines might help protect human fetuses against the Zika virus, a new mouse study suggests. Researchers found female mice that were vaccinated before they got pregnant had babies with no sign of Zika infection. "There are several vaccines in human trials right now, but to date, none of them has been shown to protect during pregnancy. We tested two different vaccines, and they both provided substantial protection," said co-senior study author Dr. Michael Diamond, a professor at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Though Zika doesn't make most people seriously ill, it can be devastating for fetuses, causing problems with brain development, including an abnormally small head. Zika can also restrict babies' growth in the womb or trigger a miscarriage, researchers said. The team tested the ability of two experimental vaccines ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Viral Infection, Insect Bites, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Zika Virus Infection

Malaria Drug Protected Mouse Fetus From Zika: Study

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 11, 2017 – A malaria drug protected mice fetuses from the Zika virus, researchers report. In humans, Zika infection during pregnancy can cause severe brain damage in infants. In this study with pregnant mice, investigators found that the malaria drug hydroxychloroquine prevented Zika from crossing the placenta. "We found that the malaria drug hydroxychloroquine effectively blocks viral transmission to the fetus," said senior author Indira Mysorekar. She's an associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology, and of pathology and immunology at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. "This drug already is used in pregnant women to treat malaria, and we suggest that it warrants evaluation in primates and women to diminish the risks of Zika infection and disease in developing fetuses," Mysorekar said in a school news release. Even though hydroxychloroquine ... Read more

Related support groups: Plaquenil, Hydroxychloroquine, Malaria, Malaria Prevention, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Malaria Prophylaxis, Zika Virus Infection, Quineprox, Plaquenil Sulfate

Health Tip: Do I Need a Zika Test?

Posted 18 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Zika is a viral disease contracted from an infected mosquito. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests Zika testing if you: Show any symptoms, such as red eyes, sore muscles, joint pain, rash, fever or headache. It's important to be tested, particularly if you are pregnant. Visited an area where Zika infection is widespread. Had unprotected sex with someone with symptoms of Zika, or who recently traveled to where Zika is widespread. You should be tested even if you don't have symptoms. Read more

Related support groups: Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Diagnosis and Investigation, Zika Virus Infection

Tissue Testing Can Spot Zika at Birth: CDC

Posted 22 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 22, 2017 – Exposure to the Zika virus in pregnancy can wreak havoc on babies, but diagnosing the infection before birth remains a challenge. Now, there's some good news: U.S. health officials say testing placental and fetal tissue after a child is born can confirm or rule out infection. Such testing found that only 1 in 10 who were in danger of being infected actually were, and infection didn't automatically mean birth defects, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday. "Testing of placental tissues from live births can continue to be considered when results of maternal Zika virus testing are not definitive or testing is not performed within the optimal time," said the researchers led by Dr. Sarah Reagan-Steiner, of the CDC's National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases. Zika infection is most often spread by ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Infections, Contraception, Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Viral Infection, Insect Bites, Diagnosis and Investigation, Cesarean Section, Zika Virus Infection, Wound Infection

Zika-Bearing Mosquitoes More Widespread in U.S. Than Expected

Posted 20 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 20, 2017 – The latest buzz from federal health officials is that mosquitoes that can spread Zika, dengue and chikungunya viruses are in more counties in the southern United States than previously thought. After a Zika outbreak in Florida last summer, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention expanded mosquito-collection measures across the South. The new study revealed a 21 percent increase in the number of counties with Zika-carrying mosquitoes (Aedes aegypti). There was also a 10 percent increase in counties with dengue-spreading mosquitoes (Aedes albopictus). The results don't mean these mosquitoes are abundant or madly transmitting the viruses. But the "findings highlight the need for continued and improved mosquito surveillance," wrote the team led by Micah Hahn. Hahn is with the CDC's division of vector-borne diseases in Fort Collins, ... Read more

Related support groups: Varicella-Zoster, Insect Bites, Zika Virus Infection, Dengue Fever, Varicella-Zoster - Prophylaxis

Health Tip: Keep Mosquitos Out of Your Yard

Posted 12 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

-- In addition to being a nuisance and a source of itch, mosquitos can carry a host of serious diseases, including Zika and West Nile. So how do you rid them from your yard? The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests: Every week, empty and clean any outside containers that may hold water. These may include trash cans, bird baths or planters. Mosquitoes lay their eggs in water. If your outside container doesn't have a lid, cover with a wire mesh. Make sure the mesh is smaller than the size of an adult mosquito. If you have a large container that you can't empty, treat it with larvicide (but don't let any person or pet drink the water). Repair any cracks or holes in your septic tank, and cover any plumbing or vent pipes with fine wire mesh. Apply insecticide in your yard. Read more

Related support groups: Viral Infection, West Nile Virus, Insect Bites, Zika Virus Infection, Diethyltoluamide

Vaginal Bacteria May Affect Herpes and Zika Transmission

Posted 9 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 9, 2017 – Vaginal bacteria may affect the sexually transmitted Zika virus and herpes simplex virus-2, possibly helping to protect women from these infections, a new study suggests. "The human vagina has a wide array of bacterial species living in communities called the microbiome; these are very important for a woman's health," study lead author Megan Amerson said. She's a doctoral student at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. The researchers ran a series of laboratory experiments to see how different bacterial environments affected how well the viruses survived and replicated. Amerson's team used transplanted vaginal microbiome samples from healthy donors. Cultures with more Lactobacillus bacteria were considered the more healthy environment. Lactobacillus is normally found in the mix of bacteria in a healthy vagina, the researchers explained. They found ... Read more

Related support groups: Herpes Simplex - Suppression, Herpes Simplex, Zika Virus Infection, Herpes Simplex - Prophylaxis

Experimental Zika Vaccine Protects Mice Against Virus: Study

Posted 9 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 9, 2017 – Just one dose of an experimental Zika vaccine provided mice with 100 percent protection against a potentially lethal dose of the virus, researchers report. The quick spread of the Zika virus and its devastating effects on the brain development of babies have made the need for a vaccine to protect against this mosquito-borne virus a global issue. Currently, the main way to ward off the virus is to avoid mosquito bites. The vaccine relies on technology previously used to create experimental vaccines for HIV and Ebola virus. It was developed by GeoVax, a company specializing in vaccines based in Atlanta. Tests of the vaccine were done at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Colorado, with funding by a grant from the CDC. The new vaccine targets a specific Zika virus protein called NS1. This protein interferes with the mosquito immune system, which ... Read more

Related support groups: Zika Virus Infection, Vaccination and Prophlaxis

1 in 20 Pregnant Women Infected With Zika Have Babies With Birth Defects: CDC

Posted 9 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 8, 2017 – One in 20 women in the U.S. territories who were infected with Zika during pregnancy had babies with serious birth defects, officials reported Thursday. The exact percentage of infants born with these Zika-linked defects depended on when during pregnancy the woman was infected, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report. Among women infected in the first trimester, 8 percent had a baby with defects; 5 percent in second trimester, and 4 percent in third trimester. The findings also showed that birth defects could occur even in women who had no symptoms of Zika infection, CDC officials stressed. In fact, 5 percent of those with symptoms gave birth to an infant with a birth defect, while 7 percent of those who had no symptoms had a baby born with a birth defect, said CDC Acting Director Dr. Anne Schuchat. "Just because you don't have ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Hydrocephalus, Insect Bites, Brain Anomalies incl Congenital, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Zika Virus Infection

Zika's Set to Return to Mainland U.S., But Budget Cuts Threaten Response

Posted 2 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 1, 2017 – The Zika virus will strike the continental United States again this summer, and looming federal budget cuts will make it hard for local officials to curb its spread, public health experts said Wednesday. The experts believe it's a foregone conclusion that more local Zika outbreaks will occur on the U.S. mainland in the coming months, much like what happened in Miami and Brownsville, Texas, last summer. "We can virtually guarantee there will be activity, particularly along the Gulf region," said Michael Osterholm. He directs the University of Minnesota's Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy. Local health departments will shoulder the burden of any response to a local Zika outbreak, infection control experts said during a media briefing hosted by the National Association of County & City Health Officials (NACCHO). Funding authorized by Congress last ... Read more

Related support groups: Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Hydrocephalus, Insect Bites, Brain Anomalies incl Congenital, Zika Virus Infection

Eye Problems May Be Tied to Zika, Lab Study Suggests

Posted 25 May 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 25, 2017 – Scientists exploring how the Zika virus passes from pregnant monkeys to their fetuses believe the infection may be more dangerous to human pregnancies than previously believed. "The results we're seeing in monkey pregnancies make us think that, as they grow, more human babies might develop Zika-related disease pathology than is currently appreciated," said lead researcher Ted Golos. Golos is professor of comparative biosciences and obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The researchers came to their conclusions after infecting four pregnant macaque monkeys with levels of the virus roughly equivalent to what they'd get from a mosquito bite. Some monkeys were infected in the first trimester and others in the third trimester of the pregnancies. The scientists found that the virus made its way to each monkey's fetus. "That is a very high ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Viral Infection, Diagnosis and Investigation, Zika Virus Infection, Visual Defect/Disturbance

Zika Arrived in Florida at Least Four Different Ways

Posted 24 May 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 24, 2017 – The 2016 Zika outbreak in Florida wasn't due to a single introduction and spread of the virus, but rather at least four separate events, researchers report. By analyzing the genetic material of Zika viruses found in people and mosquitoes in Florida, the scientists also concluded that local transmission of the Zika virus likely began in spring 2016 before the first local case was confirmed. The researchers said they also discovered that three of the Zika strains that affected Florida spread through the Caribbean islands first before reaching the state. The fourth spread through Central America, the study authors said. Based on their findings, the researchers believe that a similar Zika transmission pattern could happen again this year in Florida. There are a number of reasons why Florida is a likely hotspot for Zika outbreaks in the United States, study ... Read more

Related support groups: Viral Infection, Insect Bites, Diagnosis and Investigation, Zika Virus Infection

Zika Mosquito Can Transmit Other Viruses, Too

Posted 19 May 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 19, 2017 – The mosquito species that's the main carrier of the Zika virus might also transmit two other viruses – chikungunya and dengue – in a single bite, researchers report. "A mosquito, in theory, could give you multiple viruses at once," said Claudia Ruckert, a postdoctoral researcher at Colorado State University. The findings about the Aedes aegypti mosquito may help improve understanding of what is called coinfection, which may be fairly common in areas with mosquito-borne disease outbreaks. But, while the researchers found that mosquitoes in the lab can transmit all three viruses at once, they said this is probably extremely rare in nature. "Dual infections in humans, however, are fairly common, or more common than we would have thought," said Ruckert, who specializes in arthropod-borne and infectious diseases. The effects of coinfection are unclear, and there is ... Read more

Related support groups: Viral Infection, Insect Bites, Chikungunya Virus Infection, Zika Virus Infection, Dengue Fever

Mosquito-Borne Illnesses May Not Be Limited to Tropics

Posted 12 May 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 12, 2017 – Mosquito-borne illnesses like Zika, dengue and chikungunya can be spread in cooler temperatures than previously thought, researchers say. Based on data from Latin America and the Caribbean, transmission of the illnesses is highest at about 84 degrees Fahrenheit. Experts had long believed that 90 degrees F was their peak-transmission temperature. The findings could prove important as climate change causes temperatures to climb, the study authors said. "This means that future transmission is much more likely to occur in subtropical and even temperate areas, such as the southern United States and northern Mexico," study co-author Jeremy Cohen said in a University of South Florida news release. He is a postdoctoral researcher studying integrative biology at USF. Study co-author Jason Rohr, an associate professor of integrative biology at USF, said the findings could ... Read more

Related support groups: Viral Infection, Insect Bites, Chikungunya Virus Infection, Zika Virus Infection, Dengue Fever

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