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Wound Sepsis News

Safety Group Releases Annual Dangerous Toys List

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 16, 2016 – With the holiday season approaching, the consumer watchdog group World Against Toys Causing Harm (WATCH) has released it annual list of the most dangerous toys. The organization urges parents to be cautious when buying toys this holiday season, noting that since January 2015 there have been recalls involving more than 800,000 individual products, including 500,000 this year alone. According to WATCH, every three minutes a child is treated in a U.S. emergency room for a toy-related injury. Since January 2015, there have been at least 19 toys with safety defects recalled in the United States. These recalls involved more than 800,000 units of toys – including 500,000 this year, the group said in a news release. "Consumers can inspect new toys as well as toys already in homes and schools for dangerous hazards and stay away from any toys that may have been ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Eye Dryness/Redness, Fracture, bone, Corneal Abrasion, Visual Defect/Disturbance, Wound Cleansing, Wound Sepsis, Prevention of Fractures, Wound Debridement

Patients May Quickly Lose Beneficial Gut Bacteria in the ICU

Posted 31 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 31, 2016 – Intensive care patients have a significant loss of helpful gut bacteria within days of entering the hospital, a new study finds. These bacteria help keep people well. Losing them puts patients at risk for hospital-acquired infections that may lead to sepsis, organ failure and even death, according to the researchers. For the study, the investigators analyzed gut bacteria from 115 intensive care unit (ICU) patients at four hospitals in the United States and Canada. Measurements were taken 48 hours after admission and after either 10 days in the ICU or leaving the hospital. Compared with healthy people, the ICU patients had lower levels of helpful bacteria and higher levels of potentially harmful bacteria, the findings showed. "The results were what we feared them to be. We saw a massive depletion of normal, health-promoting species," study leader Dr. Paul ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Gastrointestinal Disorders, Sepsis, Organ Transplant, Septicemia, Wound Sepsis

Fast Action Can Prevent Sepsis Death: CDC

Posted 23 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 23, 2016 – Many cases of life-threatening sepsis could be recognized and treated long before it causes severe illness or death, U.S. health officials report. Sepsis, or septicemia, occurs when the body has an extreme response to an infection. Without prompt treatment, organ failure can quickly follow. Researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that about 70 percent of patients with sepsis had used health care services recently or had chronic diseases that required regular medical care. That means there are many opportunities for health care providers to intercept sepsis along its potentially deadly course, according to the CDC report. "When sepsis occurs, it should be treated as a medical emergency," CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden said in an agency news release. "Doctors and nurses can prevent sepsis and also the devastating effects of ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Sepsis, Bacteremia, Septicemia, Wound Cleansing, Wound Sepsis, Wound Debridement

Persistent Critical Illness May Keep Patients From Leaving ICU

Posted 5 May 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 4, 2016 – A small group of patients uses one-third of intensive care unit resources, a new study contends. Researchers analyzed data from more than one million ICU patients in Australia and New Zealand, and found that just 5 percent of them accounted for 33 percent of all days that ICU beds got used. These are critically ill patients who go from one health crisis to another and may never get well enough to leave the ICU, according to the study authors. The findings could lead to better care and efforts to find ways to prevent patients from slipping into this situation, which the researchers called persistent critical illness. "We have found that this truly is a separate 'thing' – a state patients transition into where you're there because you're there, stuck in this cascade that we can't get you out of," said study leader Dr. Theodore Iwashyna. He is a University of ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Sepsis, Bacteremia, ICU Agitation, Septicemia, Wound Sepsis

Health Tip: When You Get a Cut

Posted 9 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Most minor cuts can be cared for at home, but there are times when a cut needs a doctor's attention. The American Academy of Family Physicians says potential warning signs include a cut that: Has dirt inside that you can't remove. Bleeds excessively, meaning it soaks a bandage in less than 20 minutes, spurts blood or still bleeds despite 20 minutes of firm pressure. Causes numbness, inflammation or tenderness. Oozes a gray, creamy, thick fluid. Is accompanied by a fever of greater than 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Displays red streaks around the edges. Is on your face or prevents you from moving comfortably. Is deep, and you haven't had a tetanus shot in the past five years. Read more

Related support groups: Wound Cleansing, Wound Debridement, Wound Sepsis

Recent Hospitalization Might Raise Blood Infection Risk, Study Says

Posted 3 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 3, 2015 – A routine hospital stay may put older adults at risk for a potentially deadly condition called sepsis, according to a new study. Sepsis is a catastrophic, whole-body response to infection, according to the researchers. The study looked at data from nearly 11,000 older Americans. Over 12 years, there were 43,000 hospitalizations. The researchers found people were three times more likely to develop sepsis within three months after leaving the hospital than at any other time. The analysis also showed that the risk of sepsis three months after a hospital stay was 30 percent higher for those who received care for any type of infection. The risk of sepsis three months after hospitalization was 70 percent higher for those who had an intestinal infection caused by Clostridium difficile (or C. difficile) bacteria, the study revealed. One in 10 C. difficile infection ... Read more

Related support groups: Sepsis, Clostridial Infection, Wound Sepsis

Tips for Preventing Dog Bites

Posted 25 May 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 25, 2015 – Dog bites are a serious public health issue, but many are preventable, experts say. About 4.7 million Americans – more than half of them children – suffer dog bites each year, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Even the friendliest dog may bite when startled or surprised. Be cautious; once a child is scarred they are scarred for life," said Dr. Gregory Evans, president of the American Society for Reconstructive Microsurgery. "Most children love dogs and like to put their faces up close to the dog's face. Parents should never permit this. Injuries to the face and hands can be disfiguring or disabling and require prompt, expert medical attention," Evans said in a society news release. Two-thirds of dog bites among children occur to the head and neck, and often require plastic surgery, according to the news release. Last year alone, ... Read more

Related support groups: Rabies Prophylaxis, Wound Cleansing, Wound Debridement, Wound Sepsis

Hospitalizations After Severe Blood Infections May Be Preventable

Posted 10 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 10, 2015 – When people survive life-threatening blood infections, it's common for them to land back in the hospital within a few months. But a new study suggests that could often be avoided. The research, published in the March 10 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, focused on older Americans who were hospitalized for a severe blood infection, also known as sepsis. Sepsis arises from a powerful immune reaction to an infection, such as pneumonia or urinary tract infection: Chemicals released to fight the bacteria or virus begin to trigger inflammatory responses throughout the body – potentially causing blood clots, leaky blood vessels and multiple organ failure. Severe sepsis is often fatal, but even when people survive, they commonly land back in the hospital within 90 days, said study author Dr. Hallie Prescott, a researcher at the University of ... Read more

Related support groups: Sepsis, Septicemia, Wound Sepsis

Freshwater Algae Can Infect Wounds, Study Shows

Posted 5 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 5, 2015 – The cases of two men who got injured while enjoying the great outdoors in Missouri and Texas are giving insight into a freshwater algae that can infect wounds. Reporting in the March 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, the researchers say it's the first time that the algae – a species common in rivers and lakes called Desmodesmus armatus – has been conclusively linked to wound infections. Both men were hospitalized for their wounds, and the germ triggered infection of the injured tissue while they were in the hospital. Both men recovered, but not until some of the affected tissue was removed, said study senior author Dr. Bradley Ford, director of clinical microbiology at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics in Iowa City. He stressed, however, that even though the algae is common, "we're [still] talking about an extremely rare type of ... Read more

Related support groups: Wound Sepsis

Hospital Infection Rates Falling, But More Improvement Needed: CDC

Posted 14 Jan 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 – Rates of many types of hospital-acquired infections are on the decline, but more work is needed to protect patients, according to a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report. "Hospitals have made real progress to reduce some types of health care-associated infections – it can be done," CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden said Wednesday in an agency news release. The study used national data to track outcomes at more than 14,500 health care centers across the United States. The researchers found a 46 percent drop in "central line-associated" bloodstream infections between 2008 and 2013. This type of infection occurs when a tube placed in a large vein is either not put in correctly or not kept clean, the CDC explained. During that same time, there was a 19 percent decrease in surgical site infections among patients who underwent the 10 types of surgery ... Read more

Related support groups: Sepsis, Septicemia, Wound Sepsis

Antibiotic Sponges Don't Benefit Heart Surgery Patients: Study

Posted 18 Aug 2010 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 17 – A surgically implanted antibiotic-infused sponge doesn't lower the rate of sternal wound infections in patients who've had heart surgery, a new U.S. study has found. The sternum (breastbone) is cut open during heart surgery. Previous research has suggested that infection risk can be reduced if a sponge containing the antibiotic gentamicin is inserted when surgeons are closing the incision. The gentamicin-collagen sponge is approved in 54 countries, and more than 2 million of the sponges have been used in more than 1 million people outside the United States who underwent a wide range of procedures. (The sponge isn't approved in the United States.) One study found that the sponge reduced surgical site infection by 50 percent in cardiac patients. However, this new study by Duke University Medical Center researchers found that the sponge doesn't reduce the risk of ... Read more

Related support groups: Cardiothoracic Surgery, Wound Sepsis

Scientists Engineering Advanced Wound Dressings

Posted 10 Jul 2010 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 9 – A revolutionary medical dressing that can detect and treat infection in wounds is being developed by an international team of scientists. When the dressing detects infection-related bacteria, it will release antibiotics from tiny embedded capsules, the researchers explained. The dressing will also change color in order to alert health-care providers that there is infection in the wound. "Your skin is normally home to billions of 'friendly' bacteria, which it needs to stay healthy," project leader Dr. Toby Jenkins, of the University of Bath in England, said in a university news release. "The dressing is only triggered by disease-causing bacteria, which produce toxins that break open capsules containing the antibiotics and dye. This means that antibiotics are only released when needed, which reduces the risk of the evolution of new antibiotic-resistant superbugs such as ... Read more

Related support groups: Wound Cleansing, Wound Debridement, Wound Sepsis

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