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Wound Cleansing News

Elder Abuse Often Missed In ER

Posted 8 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 25, 2016 – About 10 percent of American seniors suffer elder abuse, yet the problem is often missed in hospital emergency departments, a new study finds. Researchers reviewed national data and found that emergency doctors make a formal diagnosis of such cases in only 1 of 7,700 visits by seniors. "These findings indicate that the vast majority of victims of elder abuse pass through the emergency department without the problem being identified," study senior author Dr. Timothy Platts-Mills, an assistant professor of emergency medicine at the University of North Carolina's School of Medicine, said in a school news release. "Emergency physicians strive to make sure that for each patient who comes through the door, all serious and life-threatening conditions are identified and addressed. For elder abuse, EDs across the country are falling short," he added. Platts-Mills is also ... Read more

Related support groups: Fracture, bone, Wound Cleansing, Wound Debridement

Safety Group Releases Annual Dangerous Toys List

Posted 18 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 16, 2016 – With the holiday season approaching, the consumer watchdog group World Against Toys Causing Harm (WATCH) has released it annual list of the most dangerous toys. The organization urges parents to be cautious when buying toys this holiday season, noting that since January 2015 there have been recalls involving more than 800,000 individual products, including 500,000 this year alone. According to WATCH, every three minutes a child is treated in a U.S. emergency room for a toy-related injury. Since January 2015, there have been at least 19 toys with safety defects recalled in the United States. These recalls involved more than 800,000 units of toys – including 500,000 this year, the group said in a news release. "Consumers can inspect new toys as well as toys already in homes and schools for dangerous hazards and stay away from any toys that may have been ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Eye Dryness/Redness, Fracture, bone, Corneal Abrasion, Visual Defect/Disturbance, Wound Cleansing, Wound Sepsis, Prevention of Fractures, Wound Debridement

Health Tip: Control a Bleeding Wound

Posted 9 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Rinsing a wound with cold water helps clean it, but it may not be enough to prevent infection. Bleeding is the body's natural way of cleansing a wound. Then again, too much bleeding isn't healthy either. Here's how to stop heavy bleeding, courtesy of the American Academy of Family Physicians: If available, use a sterile or clean piece of cloth, gauze or tissue. Hold the material over the wound, gently applying pressure. Have another piece of clean material on hand. If the bleeding soaks the first piece, apply another clean piece on top, but don't remove the first piece. Hold the clean material in place for another 20 minutes with firm pressure. Raise a bleeding leg or arm above the level of your heart. Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Scrapes, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Wound Cleansing, Minor Cuts, Wound Debridement, Minor Skin Conditions

Few Young U.S. Burn Patients Transferred to Specialized Centers

Posted 5 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 5, 2016 – Few American children with significant burns are transferred to burn centers, despite current recommendations, a new study finds. Clearer guidelines are needed on the care of pediatric burn patients, said the researchers after analyzing 2012 data from emergency departments across the United States. The investigators found that nearly 127,000 children suffered burn injuries that year, and more than half (69,000) had significant burns. That means significant burns occur to about 189 U.S. children a day. The American Burn Association recommends that children with significant burns be referred to a burn center for evaluation and care. But this study found that among children with significant burns seen at hospitals that handle few such cases, about 90 percent were treated and released from the emergency department. Four percent were admitted to the hospital and not ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Burns - External, Wound Cleansing, Wound Debridement

Fast Action Can Prevent Sepsis Death: CDC

Posted 23 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 23, 2016 – Many cases of life-threatening sepsis could be recognized and treated long before it causes severe illness or death, U.S. health officials report. Sepsis, or septicemia, occurs when the body has an extreme response to an infection. Without prompt treatment, organ failure can quickly follow. Researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that about 70 percent of patients with sepsis had used health care services recently or had chronic diseases that required regular medical care. That means there are many opportunities for health care providers to intercept sepsis along its potentially deadly course, according to the CDC report. "When sepsis occurs, it should be treated as a medical emergency," CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden said in an agency news release. "Doctors and nurses can prevent sepsis and also the devastating effects of ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Sepsis, Bacteremia, Septicemia, Wound Cleansing, Wound Sepsis, Wound Debridement

Health Tip: When You Get a Cut

Posted 9 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Most minor cuts can be cared for at home, but there are times when a cut needs a doctor's attention. The American Academy of Family Physicians says potential warning signs include a cut that: Has dirt inside that you can't remove. Bleeds excessively, meaning it soaks a bandage in less than 20 minutes, spurts blood or still bleeds despite 20 minutes of firm pressure. Causes numbness, inflammation or tenderness. Oozes a gray, creamy, thick fluid. Is accompanied by a fever of greater than 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Displays red streaks around the edges. Is on your face or prevents you from moving comfortably. Is deep, and you haven't had a tetanus shot in the past five years. Read more

Related support groups: Wound Cleansing, Wound Debridement, Wound Sepsis

Tricycle Accidents Send More Than 9,000 Tots to ER a Year: Study

Posted 14 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 14, 2015 – The lowly tricycle can be a dangerous ride, sending more than 9,300 children to U.S. emergency rooms each year, a new study finds. Kids 1 and 2 years old accounted for 52 percent of those tricycle-related ER visits in 2012-2013, researchers found. Boys were injured more often than girls, and most injuries involved cuts, usually on the face. "Parents need to take a good hard look at what their kids are playing on to make sure they don't get injured," said study co-author Dr. Hany Atallah, an assistant professor of emergency medicine at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta. Check the safety features and the age recommendations, he said. Although no trike deaths were reported during the study period, the researchers said two dozen children died from tricycle injuries between 2005 and 2012. The deaths were due to falling or drowning. For the study, ... Read more

Related support groups: Fracture, bone, Wound Cleansing, Wound Debridement, Prevention of Fractures

Health Tip: Minimize Scarring

Posted 19 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Minor wounds and surgical scars should heal themselves, but there are things you can do to minimize scarring. The American Academy of Dermatology recommends: Use gentle soap and water to clean the area. Apply a bit of petroleum jelly to keep the skin moist. Use an adhesive bandage to cover a wound after it has been washed and protected with petroleum jelly. Change the bandage daily. Follow your doctor's recommendations for wounds that needed stitches. Once the skin has healed, protect it with sunscreen. Read more

Related support groups: Skin and Structure Infection, Keloids, Scrapes, Wound Cleansing, Minor Cuts, Wound Debridement, Minor Skin Conditions

Health Tip: Should I Bandage a Wound?

Posted 3 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Proper wound care can promote healing and ward off infection. The American Academy of Family Physicians advises: An unbandaged wound typically stays more dry and heals more quickly. Wounds that may become dirty or may be irritated by clothing should be bandaged. Use bandages with an adhesive strip and sterile gauze. Change the bandage daily. Use an occlusive bandage (air-tight and anti-bacterial) for a large wound to help it stay moist and clean. Read more

Related support groups: Wound Cleansing, Wound Debridement

Dermatologist's Tips for Reducing Scars After Cuts, Scrapes

Posted 15 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 15, 2015 – During the summer, people tend to get more scrapes, cuts and scratches, which can lead to scars. But there are a number of things you can do to reduce scarring, according to Dr. Ellen Marmur, an associate clinical professor of dermatology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. "The appearance of a scar often depends on how well your wound heals. While scars from surgery or over joints like the knees and elbows are hard to avoid, scars caused by minor cuts and scrapes can become less noticeable by properly treating your wound at home," she said in an American Academy of Dermatology news release. Marmur offered some tips for reducing the appearance of scars caused by minor skin injuries. Gently wash the injury site with mild soap and water to remove debris and keep out germs. Apply petroleum jelly to keep the wound from drying ... Read more

Related support groups: Keloids, Wound Cleansing, Wound Debridement

Health Tip: Prevent Dog Bites

Posted 4 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Educating children, parents and dog owners can help prevent dog bites. The ASPCA (American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals) suggests: Never allow a child to approach a dog that is sleeping, eating, taking care of puppies or chewing a toy or bone. Never allow a child to approach a dog that is barking, growling or seems afraid. Teach your child to ask permission to pet an unfamiliar dog. If the owner says it's OK, your child should allow the dog to sniff a closed hand, then gently pet it on the shoulders or chest instead of the top of the head. Explain to your child to never approach a loose dog. A child also should never try to pet a dog behind a fence or inside a car. Read more

Related support groups: Wound Cleansing, Wound Debridement

Tips for Preventing Dog Bites

Posted 25 May 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 25, 2015 – Dog bites are a serious public health issue, but many are preventable, experts say. About 4.7 million Americans – more than half of them children – suffer dog bites each year, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Even the friendliest dog may bite when startled or surprised. Be cautious; once a child is scarred they are scarred for life," said Dr. Gregory Evans, president of the American Society for Reconstructive Microsurgery. "Most children love dogs and like to put their faces up close to the dog's face. Parents should never permit this. Injuries to the face and hands can be disfiguring or disabling and require prompt, expert medical attention," Evans said in a society news release. Two-thirds of dog bites among children occur to the head and neck, and often require plastic surgery, according to the news release. Last year alone, ... Read more

Related support groups: Rabies Prophylaxis, Wound Cleansing, Wound Debridement, Wound Sepsis

Maggots Quickly Clean Up Wounds, Study Shows

Posted 20 Dec 2011 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 20 – The surgeons' scalpel may have new (and wriggling) competition in cleaning troublesome wounds: maggots. To the uninitiated the treatment may seem strange. But new French research suggests that bagging up live, sterile fly larvae in tightly meshed dressing packs and applying them to open sores can be a quick, safe and effective way to clear away dead tissue. Actually, "maggot debridement therapy" (MDT) has a long history in medicine. And the new investigation suggests that this approach – traditionally reserved for more severe wounds – can be a quick, first-line therapy for less severe lesions. "Twenty years ago, maggot therapy was performed mostly as a 'last resort' prior to amputation," for the treatment of non-healing wounds, explained Dr. Ronald A. Sherman, a "biotherapeutics" researcher at the University of California, Irvine, and the Los Angeles and Orange ... Read more

Related support groups: Wound Cleansing, Maggots, Wound Debridement

Scientists Engineering Advanced Wound Dressings

Posted 10 Jul 2010 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 9 – A revolutionary medical dressing that can detect and treat infection in wounds is being developed by an international team of scientists. When the dressing detects infection-related bacteria, it will release antibiotics from tiny embedded capsules, the researchers explained. The dressing will also change color in order to alert health-care providers that there is infection in the wound. "Your skin is normally home to billions of 'friendly' bacteria, which it needs to stay healthy," project leader Dr. Toby Jenkins, of the University of Bath in England, said in a university news release. "The dressing is only triggered by disease-causing bacteria, which produce toxins that break open capsules containing the antibiotics and dye. This means that antibiotics are only released when needed, which reduces the risk of the evolution of new antibiotic-resistant superbugs such as ... Read more

Related support groups: Wound Cleansing, Wound Debridement, Wound Sepsis

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