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Venomous Spider Bite News

Health Tip: Dealing With a Bee Sting

Posted 26 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Most bee stings involve less-than-severe allergic reactions that don't require emergency medical care. To treat most bee stings, the Mayo Clinic advises: Use tweezers to remove the stinger from the skin as quickly as you can. The faster it's removed, the less venom is likely to enter the body. Use soap and water to gently cleanse the area. Sooth swelling and pain with a cold compress or ice pack. If the area is swollen, itchy or red, apply calamine lotion. Take an antihistamine containing diphenhydramine or chlorpheniramine if the itching or swelling is uncomfortable. Don't scratch the affected area. Doing so can lead to an infection. Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Tylenol PM, Fexofenadine, Chlorpheniramine, Periactin, Xyzal

Do You Need a Doctor for Bug Bites and Bee Stings?

Posted 25 May 2015 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, May 24, 2015 – Summer is fast approaching, along with its usual bonanza of bugs. Fortunately, most of those inevitable bites and stings aren't serious. But, experts from the American Academy of Dermatology advise going to the emergency room right away if you notice any of the following symptoms soon after a bug bite or sting: Difficulty breathing, The feeling that your throat is closing, Swelling of lips, tongue or face, Chest pain, A racing heartbeat for more than a few minutes, Dizziness or headache, Vomiting. Also beware of a red rash that looks like a donut or bullseye target after a tick bite, or a fever with a spreading red or black spotty rash. These can be signs of serious tick-related illness. "Although most bug bites and stings do not turn into a severe or even fatal illness like Rocky Mountain spotted fever, it's important to pay attention to your symptoms," Dr. ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Angioedema, Fexofenadine, Chlorpheniramine, Periactin, Xyzal, Anaphylaxis

Brown Recluse Spider Bites on the Rise, Expert Warns

Posted 29 Jul 2014 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 29, 2014 – Although the bite of a brown recluse spider is poisonous, these wounds usually heal well if left alone, an expert notes. It's still important to recognize the warning signs of an adverse reaction to a brown recluse spider bite, warned Dr. Donna Seger, medical director of the Tennessee Poison Center, particularly since these potentially dangerous bites are on the rise. "As physicians, it is hard for us to do nothing. The [bite] has classic characteristics, but if physicians are not familiar with this bite, the tendency is to debride [remove infected tissue] and cut out the lesion," she explained in a Vanderbilt University Medical Center news release. "This actually slows the healing process, and can result in disfigurement that would not occur if the lesion were left alone." Ointments, antibiotics and the anti-infective medication dapsone should not be applied ... Read more

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