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Plastic Surgeons Urge Giving Up E-Cigs Before Procedure

Posted 1 day 23 hours ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 2, 2016 – Plastic surgery patients should avoid smoking e-cigarettes for at least four weeks before their procedures, two plastic surgeons advise. Patients who smoke are believed to face a higher risk of skin flap failure, apparently because nicotine reduces blood flow, the surgeons said. "Based on our current best knowledge, it seems reasonable to advise plastic surgery candidates to cease e-cigarette use," said Dr. Peter Taub,, of Mount Sinai Medical Center and Dr. Alan Matarasso of Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Both are in New York City. "Refraining from [e-cigarette] use four weeks before surgery is a prudent course of action, despite the fact that it has yet to be determined if the effects are similar to traditional cigarettes," they added. The doctors noted that there are still plenty of unanswered questions about the safety of e-cigarettes, which produce ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Smoking, Skin Infection, Smoking Cessation, Nicotine, Nicorette, Nicoderm CQ, Nicotrol Inhaler, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Commit, Habitrol, Vascular Surgery, History - Skin Cancer, Nicotrol TD, Nicorelief, Nicorette DS, Nicotrol NS, ProStep

Drug-Coated Stents Don't Improve Patient Survival, Large Study Reports

Posted 31 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 31, 2016 – The largest trial ever conducted on stents – tiny tubes that help keep heart arteries open – suggests that pricey drug-coated (or eluting) versions may perform no better for patients over the long-term, in terms of patient survival, compared to cheaper, "bare metal" versions. "The evidence in favor of contemporary drug-eluting stents over bare-metal stents may not be as strong as has been thought," said study author Dr. Kaare Harald Bonaa. He's from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim, Norway. Bare-metal stents were used in the early days of stenting. But, arteries sometimes re-closed around the stent. That meant surgeons often had to go back in and re-open the vessel – a procedure called revascularization. Then came drug-eluting stents. These devices were coated with drugs to prevent the vessel re-closure that plagued so many ... Read more

Related support groups: Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Acute Coronary Syndrome, Acute Coronary Syndrome - Prophylaxis, Percutaneous Coronary Intervention, Revascularization Procedures - Prophylaxis, Vascular Surgery, Revascularization Procedures, Coronary Arteriography

Severe Obesity May Boost Infection Risk After Heart Surgery

Posted 1 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 1, 2016 – Severely obese people may have a higher risk of certain complications after heart bypass surgery than normal-weight patients, a new study suggests. The researchers found that severe obesity was linked to much higher odds of developing an infection soon after heart bypass surgery. And severely obese patients were also more likely to have longer hospital stays than normal-weight patients. For the study, the investigators reviewed data from more than 7,500 Canadians who had coronary artery bypass surgery between 2003 and 2014. This surgery redirects blood flow to the heart around clogged arteries. People with a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or more were considered severely obese. BMI is a rough estimate of a person's body fat based on height and weight. A BMI between 35 and 39.9 is considered severe obesity, while 30 to 34.9 is obesity. A normal BMI is 18.5 to ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Surgery, Obesity, Surgical Prophylaxis, Vascular Surgery, Cardiothoracic Surgery

Many Heart Bypass Patients Don't Take Needed Meds

Posted 4 May 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 4, 2016 – Many heart bypass patients are skipping medications meant to maintain smooth blood flow in their repaired veins, a new study finds. "It is important for patients to understand that bypass surgery is a second chance, not a cure for their disease," Dr. Michael Savage, a professor of cardiology at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, said in a university news release. Research has shown that taking statins and aspirin helps keep vein grafts used in bypass surgery open over the long term, and the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association recommend taking both medications unless they are unsafe for a patient. But among the more than 400 patients in the study, only 52 percent were taking the recommended combination of statins and aspirin. Sixty-seven percent were taking just a statin and 75 percent were using aspirin only. Those who ... Read more

Related support groups: Aspirin, High Cholesterol, Heart Attack, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Crestor, Atorvastatin, Pravastatin, Angina, Excedrin, Zocor, Lovastatin, Myocardial Infarction, Aggrenox, Rosuvastatin, Alka-Seltzer, Fiorinal, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Excedrin Migraine, Pravachol

Celebrity Cases May Help Spur Rise in Double Mastectomies

Posted 22 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, April 22, 2016 – Media coverage of celebrities who battle breast cancer is not always balanced or thorough, and this skewed view may be one factor in the growing popularity of double mastectomies, a new study suggests. "Celebrities do have a significant impact on medical decision-making, but in this case it might be a negative effect," said study author Dr. Michael Sabel. He is chief of surgical oncology at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center. "The media coverage represents a kind of bias that makes people think this [double mastectomy] is the [best] treatment for breast cancer," Sabel said. Still, the study didn't prove that media coverage actually caused the increase in double mastectomies seen in the past decade. In the study, Sabel and his team gathered information on 17 celebrities who publicly disclosed their breast cancer diagnosis between 2000 and ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Vascular Surgery

Early Stage Breast Cancer Does Need Treatment, Study Finds

Posted 15 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, April 15, 2016 – Early stage breast cancers known as DCIS (ductal carcinoma in situ) should be treated with surgery, not a "wait-and-watch" approach, according to new research. Experts have debated whether to treat early DCIS or simply monitor it to see if it progresses. The new study suggests excision of DCIS – cancer confined to the milk ducts in the breast – is best in nearly all cases. "Regardless of [tumor] grade, surveillance alone without surgery is not adequate," said Dr. Sadia Khan, advisor to the breast cancer program at Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian in Newport Beach, Calif. She presented the study results Thursday at the American Society of Breast Surgeons meeting in Dallas. Grade describes the degree of tumor-tissue abnormality and how likely it is to grow. Lower grades have better outlooks. With treatment, survival from DCIS is nearly 100 percent, Khan ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Surgical Prophylaxis, Vascular Surgery

More Americans Opting for Butt Implants, Lifts

Posted 27 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 26, 2016 – More Americans are putting their backsides to the front of the line when it comes to plastic surgery, a new report finds. Butt implants and lifts are now the fastest-growing types of plastic surgery in the United States, according to the latest data from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). The 2015 statistics also revealed another sign that men are not immune to vanity: More than 40 percent of breast reductions are now performed on males, the ASPS report found. Last year, more than 27,000 breast reduction surgeries were performed on men – 5 percent more than in 2014 and 35 percent more than in 2000. "As plastic surgery is becoming more common and accepted in men, we're seeing more of them undergo procedures to tighten and tone problem areas, like the breasts," ASPS president Dr. David Song said in a society news release. "This procedure is often ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Facial Wrinkles, Vascular Surgery, Facial Lipoatrophy, Lip Augmentation, Orbicularis Oculi

More American Women Opting for Mastectomy, Study Finds

Posted 23 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 22, 2016 – More women in the United States are undergoing mastectomies, even though the overall rate of breast cancer has remained stable, a new federal government report reveals. The rate at which American women opted for mastectomy jumped by more than a third (36 percent) from 2005 to 2013, according to data from the U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). In sheer numbers, the mastectomy rate increased from 66 to 90 per 100,000 women during the study period. There was a particularly steep climb in double mastectomies, which more than tripled: From nine to 30 per 100,000 women. By 2013, double mastectomies accounted for one-third of all mastectomies, the AHRQ said. Double mastectomies seem to be happening at a younger age, as well, the report found. In 2013, women who had double mastectomies were about 10 years younger than those who had single ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Breast Cancer - Palliative, Vascular Surgery

Surgery, Stents Equally Effective for Opening Neck Arteries: Study

Posted 19 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 18, 2016 – Surgery to open narrowed neck arteries and stenting to keep the arteries open are equally safe and effective at reducing stroke risk, a new study reveals. About 5 percent to 10 percent of all strokes in the United States are caused by narrowing of the so-called carotid arteries – the major arteries in the neck, explained lead investigator Dr. Thomas Brott. He is a neurologist and professor of neurosciences at the Mayo Clinic in Florida. "Since there are about 800,000 strokes a year, we're talking about 40,000 to 50,000 strokes a year. If we can find the best way to prevent those strokes, then we will have provided a service to those patients," Brott said in a clinic news release. Plaque buildup in the neck arteries can reduce blood flow and cause clotting, increasing the risk of stroke. Surgery removes the narrowed segment of the artery. Stenting involves ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Ischemic Stroke, Transient Ischemic Attack, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Head & Neck Surgery, Vascular Surgery

1 in 4 Breast Cancer Lumpectomies Requires Follow-Up Surgery

Posted 17 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 17, 2016 – Women with early stage breast cancer who opt for a breast-conserving surgery known as a lumpectomy have a one in four chance they will need a second operation within 90 days, researchers report. "The chance of getting a second surgery has gone down a little, but it is still high and it is substantial," said study author Dr. Art Sedrakyan. He is a professor of health care policy and research at Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York City. In a lumpectomy, the tumor tissue, along with a margin of surrounding tumor-free tissue, is removed. However, if the tissue in the margin is not completely free of tumor cells, a second operation is needed. During the study period, which ran from 2003 through 2013, the overall rate of re-operation within 90 days was almost 31 percent, Sedrakyan said. It declined from nearly 40 percent in 2003 through 2004, to 23 percent ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Breast Cancer, Tamoxifen, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Breast Cancer - Palliative, Surgical Prophylaxis, Vascular Surgery, Tamoxifen Hexal, Tamone, Tamoxen, Genox, Nolvadex D, Tamofen, Tamosin, Emblon, Nolvadex, Soltamox

Surgical Safety Checklists May Shorten Hospital Stays, Save Lives

Posted 3 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 3, 2016 – A surgical safety checklist reduced patients' risk of death over 90 days and shortened their hospital stay, a new study found. The findings suggest that surgical safety checklists can reduce health care costs by reducing the risk of complications or additional surgery to correct problems, said Dr. Matthias Bock, of Bolzano Central Hospital in Italy, and colleagues. The researchers examined outcomes for more than 10,700 surgery patient in the six months before and after a 17-to-24-item surgical safety checklist was introduced at a hospital in Italy. The study did not include heart surgery patients. The death rate within 90 days of surgery was 2.4 percent before and 2.2 percent after the checklist was introduced. The 30-day death rate fell from 1.4 percent to 1.3 percent. Average length of hospital stay was 10.4 days before and 9.6 days after the checklist was ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery, Neurosurgery, Surgical Prophylaxis, Vascular Surgery, Gastrointestinal Surgery, Cardiothoracic Surgery

Weight May Influence Outcomes After Lung Cancer Surgery

Posted 26 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 26, 2016 – Lung cancer surgery patients are most likely to have complications and to die if they're either too thin or fat, a new study suggests. The study included more than 41,000 people who had lung cancer surgery between 2009 and 2014. Patients were categorized according to their body mass index (BMI) – an estimate of body fat based on weight and height. While the study couldn't prove cause-and-effect, people who were either underweight or severely obese had the highest rates of complications and death following surgery, according to the study. The findings were to be presented Tuesday at the annual meeting of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons in Phoenix. Weight "is associated with a patient's overall physiology and health, but overweight people need to have more muscle to carry the extra weight around," study co-leader Dr. Trevor Williams of the University of ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Obesity, Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Vascular Surgery, Bronchogenic Carcinoma

Could a Scan Someday Replace Lymph Node Biopsy?

Posted 10 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 10, 2015 – Scientists are testing a noninvasive alternative to lymph node biopsy for detecting early signs that melanoma skin cancer has spread. Patients currently undergo surgical removal, often involving a radioactiver tracer, of these lymph nodes to screen for wayward cancer cells. But researchers say that in most cases this approach uncovers no sign of cancer spread while exposing patients to unnecessary risks. A team from Germany now reports that a new audio-visual imaging technique looks as effective as surgery for identifying melanoma metastasis. "Thanks to the new imaging procedure, surgery will not be necessary for many patients in the future," said study lead author Dr. Ingo Stoffels, of the department of dermatology at the Vein Center at University Hospital Essen. Nor is radiation a part of the experimental screening. The findings were published in the Dec. 9 ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Melanoma, Melanoma - Metastatic, Diagnosis and Investigation, Lymphatic obstruction, Vascular Surgery, Body Imaging

Transgender Transition Costs Make Economic Sense: Study

Posted 5 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 4, 2015 – Sex reassignment surgery and hormone treatment for transgender men and women is cost-effective, a new study indicates. "Providing health care benefits to transgender people makes economic sense," study leader William Padula, an assistant professor of health policy and management at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, said in a university news release. Most U.S. health plans don't pay for these treatments, but this Johns Hopkins-led investigation found that surgery and hormone treatment doesn't cost much more than treatment for depression, substance abuse and HIV/AIDS. These health problems are common among transgender people who can't undergo medical transition, according to the authors of the study published online recently in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. In the first five years, the cost of sex reassignment surgery and hormone treatment ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Surgery, HIV Infection, Dysthymia, Gender Dysphoria, Vascular Surgery, Genitourinary Surgical and Other Conditions

Patient's Mood During Medical Procedure May Affect Outcomes

Posted 3 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 3, 2015 – A patient's mood while undergoing a medical procedure can affect the results, a new study suggests. "Our study shows that mood matters," said lead researcher Dr. Elvira Lang, an interventional radiologist in Boston. The research included 120 women and 110 men (average age 55 years). The study participants each underwent a minimally invasive procedure in which a catheter was inserted through a blood vessel and threaded to an area of the body, such as a blocked artery, for treatment. Before their procedure, the patients completed a questionnaire to assess whether their mood was negative, neutral or positive, the study authors explained. Adverse events – such as low or high blood pressure, postoperative bleeding or abnormally slow heart rate – occurred in 22 percent of the study patients with high levels of negative mood. These negative feelings included stress, ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Diagnosis and Investigation, Surgical Prophylaxis, Vascular Surgery, Peripheral Angiography

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