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Vascular Surgery News

Stretching Eases Pain of Vessel Disease in Legs

Posted 5 May 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 5, 2017 – Stretching can increase blood flow and reduce leg pain in people with peripheral artery disease, according to a small, new study. "This is a very safe, easy intervention that can be done at home," said study senior author Judy Muller-Delp, a professor of biomedical sciences at Florida State University. "It has the potential to really improve your tolerance for walking and get you into a walking program," Muller-Delp said in an American Heart Association news release. Peripheral artery disease affects more than 8.5 million Americans, according to the heart association. A common symptom is painful muscle cramping in the hips, thighs or calves when walking, climbing stairs or exercising. This pain often goes away when you stop exercising. In this study, 13 people with peripheral artery disease, average age 71, stretched their calf muscle for 30 minutes a day using a ... Read more

Related support groups: Raynaud's Syndrome, Peripheral Arterial Disease, Intermittent Claudication, Erythromelalgia, Vascular Surgery, Thromboangiitis Obliterans, Peripheral Arteriography, Arterial Thrombosis

Women Fare Poorly With Aortic Aneurysm: Study

Posted 26 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 26, 2017 – Women with abdominal aortic aneurysms have far worse outcomes than men, and their treatment needs to be dramatically improved, British researchers report. An abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs when there is weakening and ballooning of the wall of the aorta – the largest artery which carries blood from the heart through the abdomen to the rest of the body. Patients with the condition are at risk for a potentially life-threatening rupture. The researchers reviewed international studies conducted since 2000 and found that women with abdominal aorta aneurysm fare worse than men at every stage of treatment. Women are less likely to be offered surgery to repair the problem, including keyhole surgery, which is linked with better outcomes. The keyhole technique, considered to be minimally invasive, involves inserting a tube-like graft through the leg artery to repair ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Aortic Aneurysm, Vascular Surgery

Preventive Mastectomy Rates Vary by State

Posted 29 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 29, 2017 – In certain areas of the United States, more women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer are choosing to have the unaffected breast removed, new research finds. The study also found that younger women are especially likely to have the second breast removed. Nearly half of women under age 45 diagnosed with early breast cancer in five states opted for the procedure, said the study's senior author, Dr. Ahmedin Jemal. He's vice president of the American Cancer Society's Surveillance and Health Services Research Program. The five states are Colorado, Iowa, Missouri, Nebraska and South Dakota. The study included records from 1.2 million women from 45 states and Washington, D.C. All patients were 20 and older. All had been diagnosed with early stage breast cancer in one breast and were treated with surgery between 2004 and 2012. Between those years, the ... Read more

Related support groups: Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Diagnosis and Investigation, Breast Cancer - Palliative, Vascular Surgery

U.S. Doctors Trained Overseas Have Slightly Better Patient Outcomes

Posted 6 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 3, 2017 – Death rates are lower for older Americans treated by doctors trained in other countries than by those who went to a U.S. medical school, a new study reports. That finding held true even though foreign-trained doctors are more likely to care for patients with more chronic health problems. The results of this study should dispel Americans' concerns about the quality of care provided by doctors trained in other countries, the researchers said. The study included information from more than 1.2 million Medicare patients aged 65 and older. All had been admitted to the hospital between 2011 and 2014. The 30-day death rate was 11.2 percent for patients treated by foreign-trained doctors and 11.6 percent for those treated by U.S.-trained doctors, the investigators found. There was no difference in patient hospital readmission rates. But the cost of care was slightly ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Hip Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Head & Neck Surgery, Vascular Surgery, Cardiothoracic Surgery

Emergency Surgery Riskier for Kids in Poorer Countries

Posted 13 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 13, 2016 – Children in poorer countries are much more likely to die after emergency abdominal surgery than those in wealthy nations, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed the outcomes of more than 1,400 children in 43 countries who had emergency abdominal surgery in 2014. The surgeries were for conditions such as appendicitis, congenital abnormalities and hernia. Compared to children in wealthy countries, those in middle-income nations were four times more likely to die within 30 days of surgery, and those in poor countries were seven times more likely to die, the study found. Rates of serious complications were just over 11 percent among children in poor countries, compared with just over 6 percent for those in middle-income and rich countries. Rates of wound infection were 21 percent for children in poor countries, 9.6 percent for those in middle-income countries, and ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Appendectomy, Surgical Prophylaxis, Vascular Surgery, Gastrointestinal Surgery

Plastic Surgeons Urge Giving Up E-Cigs Before Procedure

Posted 2 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 2, 2016 – Plastic surgery patients should avoid smoking e-cigarettes for at least four weeks before their procedures, two plastic surgeons advise. Patients who smoke are believed to face a higher risk of skin flap failure, apparently because nicotine reduces blood flow, the surgeons said. "Based on our current best knowledge, it seems reasonable to advise plastic surgery candidates to cease e-cigarette use," said Dr. Peter Taub,, of Mount Sinai Medical Center and Dr. Alan Matarasso of Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Both are in New York City. "Refraining from [e-cigarette] use four weeks before surgery is a prudent course of action, despite the fact that it has yet to be determined if the effects are similar to traditional cigarettes," they added. The doctors noted that there are still plenty of unanswered questions about the safety of e-cigarettes, which produce ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Smoking, Skin Infection, Smoking Cessation, Nicotine, Nicorette, Nicoderm CQ, Nicotrol Inhaler, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Commit, Habitrol, Vascular Surgery, History - Skin Cancer, Nicotrol TD, Nicorelief, Nicorette DS, Nicotrol NS, ProStep

Drug-Coated Stents Don't Improve Patient Survival, Large Study Reports

Posted 31 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 31, 2016 – The largest trial ever conducted on stents – tiny tubes that help keep heart arteries open – suggests that pricey drug-coated (or eluting) versions may perform no better for patients over the long-term, in terms of patient survival, compared to cheaper, "bare metal" versions. "The evidence in favor of contemporary drug-eluting stents over bare-metal stents may not be as strong as has been thought," said study author Dr. Kaare Harald Bonaa. He's from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim, Norway. Bare-metal stents were used in the early days of stenting. But, arteries sometimes re-closed around the stent. That meant surgeons often had to go back in and re-open the vessel – a procedure called revascularization. Then came drug-eluting stents. These devices were coated with drugs to prevent the vessel re-closure that plagued so many ... Read more

Related support groups: Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Acute Coronary Syndrome, Acute Coronary Syndrome - Prophylaxis, Percutaneous Coronary Intervention, Revascularization Procedures - Prophylaxis, Vascular Surgery, Revascularization Procedures, Coronary Arteriography

Severe Obesity May Boost Infection Risk After Heart Surgery

Posted 1 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 1, 2016 – Severely obese people may have a higher risk of certain complications after heart bypass surgery than normal-weight patients, a new study suggests. The researchers found that severe obesity was linked to much higher odds of developing an infection soon after heart bypass surgery. And severely obese patients were also more likely to have longer hospital stays than normal-weight patients. For the study, the investigators reviewed data from more than 7,500 Canadians who had coronary artery bypass surgery between 2003 and 2014. This surgery redirects blood flow to the heart around clogged arteries. People with a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or more were considered severely obese. BMI is a rough estimate of a person's body fat based on height and weight. A BMI between 35 and 39.9 is considered severe obesity, while 30 to 34.9 is obesity. A normal BMI is 18.5 to ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Surgery, Obesity, Surgical Prophylaxis, Vascular Surgery, Cardiothoracic Surgery

Many Heart Bypass Patients Don't Take Needed Meds

Posted 4 May 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 4, 2016 – Many heart bypass patients are skipping medications meant to maintain smooth blood flow in their repaired veins, a new study finds. "It is important for patients to understand that bypass surgery is a second chance, not a cure for their disease," Dr. Michael Savage, a professor of cardiology at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, said in a university news release. Research has shown that taking statins and aspirin helps keep vein grafts used in bypass surgery open over the long term, and the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association recommend taking both medications unless they are unsafe for a patient. But among the more than 400 patients in the study, only 52 percent were taking the recommended combination of statins and aspirin. Sixty-seven percent were taking just a statin and 75 percent were using aspirin only. Those who ... Read more

Related support groups: Aspirin, High Cholesterol, Heart Attack, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Crestor, Atorvastatin, Pravastatin, Angina, Excedrin, Zocor, Lovastatin, Myocardial Infarction, Aggrenox, Rosuvastatin, Alka-Seltzer, Fiorinal, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Excedrin Migraine, Angina Pectoris Prophylaxis

Celebrity Cases May Help Spur Rise in Double Mastectomies

Posted 22 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, April 22, 2016 – Media coverage of celebrities who battle breast cancer is not always balanced or thorough, and this skewed view may be one factor in the growing popularity of double mastectomies, a new study suggests. "Celebrities do have a significant impact on medical decision-making, but in this case it might be a negative effect," said study author Dr. Michael Sabel. He is chief of surgical oncology at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center. "The media coverage represents a kind of bias that makes people think this [double mastectomy] is the [best] treatment for breast cancer," Sabel said. Still, the study didn't prove that media coverage actually caused the increase in double mastectomies seen in the past decade. In the study, Sabel and his team gathered information on 17 celebrities who publicly disclosed their breast cancer diagnosis between 2000 and ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Vascular Surgery

Early Stage Breast Cancer Does Need Treatment, Study Finds

Posted 15 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, April 15, 2016 – Early stage breast cancers known as DCIS (ductal carcinoma in situ) should be treated with surgery, not a "wait-and-watch" approach, according to new research. Experts have debated whether to treat early DCIS or simply monitor it to see if it progresses. The new study suggests excision of DCIS – cancer confined to the milk ducts in the breast – is best in nearly all cases. "Regardless of [tumor] grade, surveillance alone without surgery is not adequate," said Dr. Sadia Khan, advisor to the breast cancer program at Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian in Newport Beach, Calif. She presented the study results Thursday at the American Society of Breast Surgeons meeting in Dallas. Grade describes the degree of tumor-tissue abnormality and how likely it is to grow. Lower grades have better outlooks. With treatment, survival from DCIS is nearly 100 percent, Khan ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Surgical Prophylaxis, Vascular Surgery

More Americans Opting for Butt Implants, Lifts

Posted 27 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 26, 2016 – More Americans are putting their backsides to the front of the line when it comes to plastic surgery, a new report finds. Butt implants and lifts are now the fastest-growing types of plastic surgery in the United States, according to the latest data from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). The 2015 statistics also revealed another sign that men are not immune to vanity: More than 40 percent of breast reductions are now performed on males, the ASPS report found. Last year, more than 27,000 breast reduction surgeries were performed on men – 5 percent more than in 2014 and 35 percent more than in 2000. "As plastic surgery is becoming more common and accepted in men, we're seeing more of them undergo procedures to tighten and tone problem areas, like the breasts," ASPS president Dr. David Song said in a society news release. "This procedure is often ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Facial Wrinkles, Vascular Surgery, Facial Lipoatrophy, Lip Augmentation, Orbicularis Oculi

More American Women Opting for Mastectomy, Study Finds

Posted 23 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 22, 2016 – More women in the United States are undergoing mastectomies, even though the overall rate of breast cancer has remained stable, a new federal government report reveals. The rate at which American women opted for mastectomy jumped by more than a third (36 percent) from 2005 to 2013, according to data from the U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). In sheer numbers, the mastectomy rate increased from 66 to 90 per 100,000 women during the study period. There was a particularly steep climb in double mastectomies, which more than tripled: From nine to 30 per 100,000 women. By 2013, double mastectomies accounted for one-third of all mastectomies, the AHRQ said. Double mastectomies seem to be happening at a younger age, as well, the report found. In 2013, women who had double mastectomies were about 10 years younger than those who had single ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Breast Cancer - Palliative, Vascular Surgery

Surgery, Stents Equally Effective for Opening Neck Arteries: Study

Posted 19 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 18, 2016 – Surgery to open narrowed neck arteries and stenting to keep the arteries open are equally safe and effective at reducing stroke risk, a new study reveals. About 5 percent to 10 percent of all strokes in the United States are caused by narrowing of the so-called carotid arteries – the major arteries in the neck, explained lead investigator Dr. Thomas Brott. He is a neurologist and professor of neurosciences at the Mayo Clinic in Florida. "Since there are about 800,000 strokes a year, we're talking about 40,000 to 50,000 strokes a year. If we can find the best way to prevent those strokes, then we will have provided a service to those patients," Brott said in a clinic news release. Plaque buildup in the neck arteries can reduce blood flow and cause clotting, increasing the risk of stroke. Surgery removes the narrowed segment of the artery. Stenting involves ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Ischemic Stroke, Transient Ischemic Attack, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Head & Neck Surgery, Vascular Surgery

1 in 4 Breast Cancer Lumpectomies Requires Follow-Up Surgery

Posted 17 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 17, 2016 – Women with early stage breast cancer who opt for a breast-conserving surgery known as a lumpectomy have a one in four chance they will need a second operation within 90 days, researchers report. "The chance of getting a second surgery has gone down a little, but it is still high and it is substantial," said study author Dr. Art Sedrakyan. He is a professor of health care policy and research at Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York City. In a lumpectomy, the tumor tissue, along with a margin of surrounding tumor-free tissue, is removed. However, if the tissue in the margin is not completely free of tumor cells, a second operation is needed. During the study period, which ran from 2003 through 2013, the overall rate of re-operation within 90 days was almost 31 percent, Sedrakyan said. It declined from nearly 40 percent in 2003 through 2004, to 23 percent ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Breast Cancer, Tamoxifen, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Surgical Prophylaxis, Breast Cancer - Palliative, Vascular Surgery, Tamoxifen Hexal, Nolvadex, Tamone, Tamoxen, Genox, Nolvadex D, Tamofen, Tamosin, Emblon, Soltamox

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