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Health Tip: Avoid These 5 Pre-Bedtime Don'ts

Posted 2 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Your habits just before you slip into bed could be sabotaging your night of sleep. The National Sleep Foundation says do NOT: Take any over-the-counter medications that contain pseudoephedrine, found in common cold medicines, which can keep you awake. Opt for a nighttime formula that may help you feel drowsy. Text, watch TV or spend time on the computer shortly before bed. Take a hot shower or bath just before bed. It's best to do so about an hour before you plan to sleep, as that gives your body temperature time to drop again. Indulge in a greasy, fattening, salty bedtime snack, which can be stimulating and trigger nightmares. Drink caffeine beyond the morning, as it can stay in your system for as long as 12 hours. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Sta-D, Caffeine, Pseudoephedrine, Fioricet, Excedrin, Claritin-D, Alert, Mucinex D, DayQuil, Fiorinal, Allegra-D, Excedrin Migraine, Cafergot, Bromfed DM, Tylenol Cold, Advil Cold and Sinus, Lodrane

Health Tip: Reduce Your Risk of Adverse Drug Reactions

Posted 20 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Over-the-counter (OTC) medications may be available without a prescription, but that doesn't mean they don't come with potential risks. Here's advice on how to reduce your risk of adverse effects from OTC meds, courtesy of the American Academy of Family Physicians: Only take an OTC medication if you really need it. Check with your doctor before you take such medication. Read product labels to understand the ingredients, risks and how the medication works. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have questions. Take the medications exactly as instructed with any supplied measuring device. Never mix a medication into food or drink unless the pharmacist or doctor says it's OK. Never take a medication with alcohol. If you take vitamins, don't take them at the same time as a medication. Make a list of any adverse reactions you have with a medication, and discuss with your doctor. Read more

Related support groups: Oxycodone, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Tramadol, OxyContin, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid, Opana ER, Roxicodone, MS Contin, Butrans, Ultram, Hydromorphone, Nucynta, Buprenorphine, Pseudoephedrine

Health Tip: Treating Your Child's Cold

Posted 12 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Your child has a nasty cold, but you've been told the toddler is too young for an over-the-counter cold medicine. So what do you do? The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends: Blowing the nose is best. Avoid antihistamines unless it's suspected that allergies are the cause. Using a saline nasal wash also can help a stuffed up nose. For stubborn mucus, carefully remove with a wet cotton swab. Offering warm, clear fluids to a baby aged 3 months to one year for a cough (never honey at this age.) Offer honey for children 1 year and older. For coughing, have the child breathe in a steamy bathroom. Offer plenty of fluids to help thin secretions. You can also run a humidifier. Read more

Related support groups: Cold Symptoms, Pseudoephedrine, Sudafed, Phenylephrine, Sore Throat, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Ephedrine, Afrin, Oxymetazoline, Astelin, Azelastine, Phenylpropanolamine, Otrivin, Dymista, Sudafed PE, 4-Way, Tetrahydrozoline, SudoGest, Olopatadine, Dexatrim

Ah-Choo! Sneeze 'Cloud' Quickly Covers a Room, Study Finds

Posted 23 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 23, 2015 – Just in time for cold and flu season, a new study finds the average human sneeze expels a high-velocity cloud that can contaminate a room in minutes. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) came to that conclusion by analyzing videos of two healthy people sneezing about 50 times over several days. It's well known that sneezes can spread infectious diseases such as measles or the flu, because viruses suspended in sneeze droplets can be inhaled by others or deposited on surfaces and later picked up as people touch them. But it wasn't clear how far sneeze droplets can spread, or why some people are more likely to spread illness through sneezes than others. In a prior study, the team led by MIT's Lydia Bourouiba found that within a few minutes, sneeze droplets can cover an area the size of a room and reach ventilation ducts at ceiling height. ... Read more

Related support groups: Influenza, Cold Symptoms, Pseudoephedrine, Sudafed, Phenylephrine, Sore Throat, Ephedrine, Afrin, Measles, Oxymetazoline, Astelin, Azelastine, Phenylpropanolamine, Sudafed PE, Otrivin, Dymista, Avian Influenza, SudoGest, 4-Way, Tetrahydrozoline

Prepare Yourself for Cold, Flu Season

Posted 29 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 – Cold and flu season has arrived, but there are a number of things you can do to protect yourself from infection, an expert says. "People over the age of 65 should get a high-dose flu shot. People under the age of 65 should get a regular flu shot. People who are under 65 and allergic to eggs should get nasal flu spray," Dr. Howard Selinger, chair of family medicine in the School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University in Connecticut, said in a university news release. "Flu shots are safe, last for a year and are covered by insurance." People with chronic illnesses require even more protection, Selinger said. "People over 65 with any type of chronic illness, such as diabetes, high blood pressure or heart disease, should get two pneumonia vaccines: Pneumovax and Prevnar. These vaccinations are given separately and protect from 36 strains of pneumococcal pneumonia. ... Read more

Related support groups: Influenza, Cold Symptoms, Pseudoephedrine, Sudafed, Phenylephrine, Sore Throat, Ephedrine, Afrin, Astelin, Oxymetazoline, Azelastine, Phenylpropanolamine, Dymista, Sudafed PE, Otrivin, Avian Influenza, Influenza A, FluLaval, Tetrahydrozoline, 4-Way

Drugs May Be as Good as Surgery for Chronic Sinusitis

Posted 29 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 – If you struggle with chronic sinus infections and think surgery is the only way to end your misery, new research suggests that's not always the case. Sticking with treatments that can include nasal sprays, antibiotics and antihistamines may be as effective as surgery in helping some patients achieve a better quality of life, the small study found. Among 38 patients with chronic sinus infections who continued with medical therapy rather than have surgery, the annual cost of lost productivity dropped from more than $3,400 to about $2,700 over almost 13 months of treatment. Moreover, absenteeism was reduced from five days to two days and going to work sick was cut from 17 days to 15 days, the researchers reported. "Patients who have relatively minimally reduced productivity at work and minimally reduced quality of life from their underlying chronic sinusitis can ... Read more

Related support groups: Sinusitis, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Pseudoephedrine, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Sudafed, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Phenylephrine, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Chlorpheniramine

Colds, Flu Up Odds for Stroke in Kids, Though Risk Is Low: Study

Posted 30 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30, 2015 – Having a cold or the flu may sometimes trigger a stroke in children – particularly those with underlying health conditions – though the overall risk remains low, a new study indicates. Comparing two groups of more than 350 children – one set had suffered "ischemic" clot-based strokes and the other had not – researchers found that those with stroke were six times more likely to have had a minor infection the previous week than those who didn't have a stroke. Also, children who had most or all of their routine vaccinations were significantly less likely to suffer a stroke than children who received only some or no vaccinations, according to the study, published online Sept. 30 in the journal Neurology. "The findings are definitely revelatory in terms of expanding our understanding of childhood stroke compared to a decade ago," said study author Dr. Heather ... Read more

Related support groups: Influenza, Ischemic Stroke, Cold Symptoms, Pseudoephedrine, Sudafed, Transient Ischemic Attack, Phenylephrine, Sore Throat, Ephedrine, Swine Influenza, Afrin, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Astelin, Oxymetazoline, Azelastine, Phenylpropanolamine, Sudafed PE, Otrivin, Dymista, Tetrahydrozoline

Health Tip: Avoid These Things Before Bedtime

Posted 20 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

-- If you're not getting enough sleep, it could be due to your activities before you hit the hay. The National Sleep Foundation warns against: Taking medications that contain pseudoephedrine, a stimulant. If you need relief from cold or allergy symptoms, opt for an antihistamine designed for night-time use. Don't watch TV, work at a computer or use a tablet or smartphone. Light from these screens can over-stimulate your brain. Opt for a book or music instead. Don't take a hot bath just before bed. Bathe at least an hour before so your body has time to cool off before sleep. Don't go to sleep with a full belly, especially if it's loaded with foods high in fat and salt. Don't drink beverages that contain caffeine after the morning. Caffeine can stay in your system for up to 12 hours. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Sta-D, Promethazine, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Pseudoephedrine, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Sudafed, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, NyQuil, Claritin-D

Is It a Cold or an Allergy?

Posted 5 May 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 5, 2015 – It can be difficult for parents to tell whether their child has a cold or hay fever, but there are ways to distinguish between the two, experts say. "Runny, stuffy or itchy noses, sneezing, coughing, fatigue, and headaches can all be symptoms of both allergies and colds, but when parents pay close attention to minor details they will be able to tell the difference," Dr. Michelle Lierl, a pediatric allergist at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, said in a hospital news release. "Children who have springtime or fall allergies have much more itching of their noses; they often have fits of sneezing and usually rub their noses in an upward motion," Lierl explained. "They also complain about an itchy, scratchy throat or itchy eyes, whereas with a cold, they don't." Nasal discharge is usually clear if someone has allergies and yellowish if someone has a ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Sta-D, Promethazine, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Cold Symptoms, Pseudoephedrine, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Sudafed, Cyproheptadine

Know What's in Your Child's Medications, FDA Warns

Posted 17 Mar 2013 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, March 17 – It's the time of year when cold season and allergy season overlap, and parents need to know the active ingredients in the medicines they give their children for these conditions, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns. Taking more than one medicine at a time could cause serious health problems if the drugs have the same active ingredient, which is the component that makes the medicine effective against a particular condition. For over-the-counter products, active ingredients are listed first on a medicine's Drug Facts label. For prescription medicines, active ingredients are listed in a patient package insert or consumer information sheet provided by the pharmacist, the FDA said. Many medicines have just one active ingredient. But combination medicines – such as those for allergy, cough or fever and congestion – may have more than one. Antihistamine is an ... Read more

Related support groups: Vicodin, Norco, Lortab, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Benadryl, Acetaminophen, Advil, Zyrtec, Sta-D, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Pseudoephedrine, Paracetamol, Fioricet, Motrin, Excedrin, Cetirizine

Boys More Prone to OTC Drug Abuse Than Girls, Study Suggests

Posted 31 Oct 2012 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 31 – Boys may be more likely than girls to abuse over-the-counter drugs, new study results suggest. University of Cincinnati researchers looked at over-the-counter (OTC) drug abuse among students in grades 7 through 12 in 133 schools across greater Cincinnati who took part in a 2009-2010 survey. Early analysis of the data showed that 10 percent of students said they abused over-the-counter drugs such as cough syrups and decongestants. This type of drug abuse can result in accidental poisoning, seizures and physical and mental addictions, the study authors pointed out in a university news release. High rates of over-the-counter drug abuse were found among male and female junior high school students. However, boys had a higher risk of longtime use of over-the-counter drugs compared with girls, the investigators found. Teens who reported abusing over-the-counter drugs were ... Read more

Related support groups: Sta-D, Pseudoephedrine, Sudafed, NyQuil, Dry Cough, Mucinex DM, Dextromethorphan, Claritin-D, Mucinex D, Alka-Seltzer, Substance Abuse, DayQuil, Delsym, Daytime, Allegra-D, C-Phen DM, Bromfed DM, Tylenol Cold, Advil Cold and Sinus, Lodrane

Health Tip: Alcohol Can Interact With Medications

Posted 25 Oct 2011 by Drugs.com

-- Over-the-counter medications may seem safer because they don't require a prescription. But they can still interact badly when alcohol enters the mix. The American Academy of Family Physicians mentions these popular medications that may have adverse effects if mixed with alcohol: NSAID pain relievers, which may lead to gastrointestinal bleeding if taken while consuming as few as two alcoholic drink per week. Acetaminophen, which may cause liver damage when taken with alcohol. Some OTC antihistamines can make you drowsy when taken with alcohol. Decongestants and cough medications that contain the cough suppressant dextromethorphan can increase drowsiness when taken with alcohol. Herbal supplements, such as kava kava, St. John's wort or valerian root, may increase drowsiness if taken with alcohol. Read more

Related support groups: Hydrocodone, Percocet, Vicodin, Norco, Codeine, Lortab, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Benadryl, Acetaminophen, Advil, Diclofenac, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Voltaren, Aleve, Promethazine, Claritin

FDA Bans Unapproved Prescription Cough, Cold and Allergy Meds

Posted 2 Mar 2011 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 2 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Wednesday that it plans to remove about 500 unapproved prescription cough, cold, and allergy medicines from pharmacy shelves. These drugs have not been evaluated by the FDA for safety and effectiveness, and they may be riskier to take than approved over-the-counter (OTC) drugs that treat these same conditions, agency officials explained. "This action is necessary to protect consumers from the potential risks posed by unapproved drugs, because we don't know what's in them, whether they work properly or how they are made," Deborah M. Autor, director of the agency's Office of Compliance at the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said during a morning news conference. Of particular concern are drugs that have time-release formulations, Autor said. "We know from experience that these type of products are complicated to ... Read more

Related support groups: Benadryl, Mucinex, Sta-D, Diphenhydramine, Cold Symptoms, Pseudoephedrine, Sudafed, NyQuil, Guaifenesin, Tylenol PM, Dry Cough, Cheratussin AC, Phenylephrine, Mucinex DM, Dextromethorphan, Claritin-D, Robitussin, Mucinex D, Chlorpheniramine, Unisom

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