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Traveler's Diarrhea Prophylaxis News

Health Tip: Keeping Foods Separate During Grilling

Posted 26 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

-- It's important to prevent cross-contamination of food while grilling. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics advises: Make sure your grill is clean before you begin. Remove any leftover food particles. Don't put cooked food back on the same plate that held raw food. Wash with hot soapy water first, or use a different plate. Use separate grilling utensils to turn food once it's cooked, or thoroughly clean utensils after handling raw food. Never use marinade that contained raw meat to baste cooked meat. Read more

Related support groups: Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea Prophylaxis

Health Tip: Packing for a Picnic

Posted 5 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Don't let contaminated food spoil your summer picnic. Make sure your edibles are safely packed. The Foodsafety.gov website recommends: Packing food in an insulated cooler with ice or frozen gel packs. This includes deli meat, raw seafood, poultry or meat, pasta, egg, tuna, seafood salad, dairy products, and fruit and vegetables. Filling the cooler completely to help it stay cold. Store it in a shady spot, not in direct sunlight. Trying not to open the cooler frequently. Keeping food cold until it's time to cook. Keeping raw meat, seafood and poultry away from prepared foods. Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea Prophylaxis

Food Safety Should Come 1st on the 4th

Posted 5 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 4, 2016 – While having fun this Fourth of July, don't forget about food safety. "Because foodborne bacteria thrive and multiply more quickly in warmer temperatures, foodborne illness can spike during summer," said Al Almanza, deputy undersecretary for food safety at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). "This is likely because people are spending more time outside – away from the sink and equipment in the kitchen that help consumers keep food safe," he added in a USDA news release. Each year, about one in six Americans (48 million people) suffers from foodborne illnesses, resulting in about 128,000 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Always keep cold foods cold (below 40 degrees Fahrenheit) and hot foods hot (above 140 degrees F), says the USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service. Without refrigeration ... Read more

Related support groups: Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea Prophylaxis

When Cooking Outside, Don't Let Food Safety Slide

Posted 1 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 1, 2016 – Food is a big part of many Fourth of July celebrations. But take care when making and storing your meal, so that a bout of food poisoning doesn't ruin the rest of your holiday plans, a dietary expert advises. When having a picnic or barbecue, it's important to keep cold foods cold and hot foods hot. "Cold foods should be ideally put in shallow containers and then kept on ice to keep them below 40 degrees Fahrenheit. Hot foods should be kept warm – above 160 degrees – to prevent bacteria from growing on food," said Liz Weinandy, a dietitian at Ohio State University's Wexner Medical Center. Use a thermometer when cooking. In general, ground meats like hamburgers should be cooked through to an internal temperature of at least 160 degrees F, and poultry like chicken breasts to 165 degrees. "Make sure to use separate cutting boards, utensils, tongs and plates for ... Read more

Related support groups: Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea Prophylaxis

Celery-Onion Blend Is Cause of E.Coli Outbreak Tied to Costco Chicken Salad: CDC

Posted 29 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 27, 2015 – A celery-onion blend included in a rotisserie chicken salad from Costco stores is the probable culprit behind an ongoing E.coli outbreak and has been recalled, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday. According to a CDC news release, the Montana Public Health Laboratory tested the diced celery-onion blend and found results that "indicated the presence of E. coli O157:H7." As a result, "Taylor Farms Pacific, Inc., voluntarily recalled multiple products containing celery," the agency said. The E. coli outbreak that has so far sickened 19 people in seven states has been linked to rotisserie chicken salad made and sold at Costco stores. Most of the illnesses have occurred in the western United States. Affected states are California, Colorado, Missouri, Montana, Utah, Washington and Virginia. Five patients have been hospitalized and two have ... Read more

Related support groups: Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea Prophylaxis

Multistate Foodborne Illness Outbreaks the Most Deadly: CDC

Posted 3 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 3, 2015 – Multistate outbreaks caused by contaminated food account for more than half of all foodborne illness deaths in the United States, even though they only represent 3 percent of all reported outbreaks, a new government report shows. The findings prompted U.S. health officials to urge the food industry to play a larger role in preventing multistate outbreaks, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. "Americans shouldn't have to worry about getting sick from the food they eat," CDC director Dr. Tom Frieden said during a news conference Tuesday. But each year one in six Americans is sickened by contaminated food, he said, adding that, "food industries play a critical role in improving our food safety." The food industry can help stop outbreaks by keeping better records to allow officials to trace contaminated food faster and by alerting consumers to ... Read more

Related support groups: Poisoning, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Salmonella Enteric Fever, Traveler's Diarrhea, Salmonella Gastroenteritis, Meningitis - Listeriosis, Traveler's Diarrhea Prophylaxis, Enterocolitis, Salmonella Extraintestinal Infection

Beach Sand, Not Water, More Likely to Make You Sick

Posted 17 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 17, 2015 – Heading to the beach this weekend? A new study finds that when it comes to germs, beachgoers may have more to fear from the sand they sit on than the water they swim in. Studies done with water and sand from Hawaiian beaches found a "higher abundance" of bacteria indicating fecal contamination – bugs such a E. coli, for example – in the sand than in the water. In fact, "wastewater-contaminated marine beach sand may act as a chronic source of wastewater bacteria to the beach seawater," writes a team led by Tao Yan of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Public health experts have long known that wastewater from sewage and other sources can contaminate seawater, some days necessitating beach closures. Swimmers who come into contact with or accidentally swallow fecal-contaminated water can suffer stomach ache, diarrhea and rashes, Yan's team noted. However, the ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Gastroenteritis, Skin and Structure Infection, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Infection Prophylaxis, Traveler's Diarrhea Prophylaxis

Health Tip: Competing in Marathon Races

Posted 22 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Marathon races often take place in areas that may pose a danger of illness from contaminated water. To help you avoid getting sick, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests: Avoid swallowing water in which you're swimming, even if it doesn't appear muddy. As soon as you finish competing and before eating or drinking, wash your hands and face with soap and water. If you have diarrhea or are vomiting on the day of the race, don't compete. This will help protect the health of other participants. Read more

Related support groups: Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Traveler's Diarrhea Prophylaxis

Health Tip: Prepare for Illness if Traveling Abroad

Posted 15 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Getting sick while traveling doesn't have to lead to disaster. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends: Determine if you need special insurance, such as evacuation or travel health insurance. Register with the nearest U.S. embassy once you reach your destination. Pack all medications you will need, including extras. Always have with you a small card, written in the host language, that lists your health conditions, blood type, allergies and medications. If you have a serious chronic medical condition, wear a MedicAlert bracelet. Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Traveler's Diarrhea Prophylaxis

Health Tip: Reduce the Risk of Traveler's Diarrhea

Posted 12 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Traveler's diarrhea can put a damper on any trip, but there are a few safer foods that can help reduce your risk. The Cleveland Clinic suggests: Soup, tea and hot coffee, if served steaming hot. Noncarbonated water served in unopened bottles or cans. Carbonated soda, mineral water or beer served in unopened bottles or cans. Butter and processed cheese served in the original package. Dry bread. Read more

Related support groups: Traveler's Diarrhea, Traveler's Diarrhea Prophylaxis

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