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Health Tip: Control Asthma

Posted 7 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Asthma medications can tame your symptoms and greatly improve your quality of life. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says benefits of controlling asthma include: Better breathing. Regaining the ability to participate in sports and other physical activities. Better sleep. Freedom from wheezing and coughing. Avoiding hospital stays. Read more

Related support groups: Asthma, Asthma - Maintenance, Fluticasone, Ribavirin, Qvar, Asthma - Acute, Budesonide, Flovent, Entocort, Tobramycin, Mometasone, Entocort EC, Acetylcysteine, Beclomethasone, Mucomyst, Alvesco, Pulmicort Flexhaler, Uceris, Asmanex Twisthaler, Pulmicort Turbuhaler

Many Parents Ill-Informed About Kids' Asthma Meds

Posted 31 May 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 31, 2016 – Only half of parents of children with asthma fully understand the use of their youngsters' asthma medications, a new study finds. A survey of parents of 740 children with probable persistent asthma found just 49 percent knew what kind of medication their child was prescribed and how often to use it. Following recommended guidelines is key to controlling asthma symptoms, experts say. "Adherence to the guidelines has demonstrated improved outcomes: decreased hospitalizations, emergency department visits and outpatient visits," said study primary author Dr. Ann Chen Wu, of the Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute in Boston. Parents were asked which asthma controller medications their child was prescribed and how often they should be taken. Responses were compared to instructions from their child's health care provider. Records showed that 77 percent of the ... Read more

Related support groups: Asthma, Asthma - Maintenance, Fluticasone, Ribavirin, Qvar, Asthma - Acute, Budesonide, Flovent, Entocort, Tobramycin, Mometasone, Entocort EC, Acetylcysteine, Beclomethasone, Mucomyst, Alvesco, Pulmicort Flexhaler, Uceris, Asmanex Twisthaler, Pulmicort Turbuhaler

Fewer Inhaled Steroids May Be OK for Asthmatic Children

Posted 27 May 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 27, 2016 – Inhaled steroid therapy is commonly used to treat asthmatic children with persistent, daily wheezing episodes. However, a new study suggests that the powerful medicines may not be needed on a daily basis for kids whose wheezing occurs sporadically, such as when they catch a cold. "It makes sense that these children with frequent symptoms require daily treatment, whereas those who wheeze just during viral illnesses may only need treatment during illnesses," study lead author Dr. Sunitha Kaiser, of the University of California, San Francisco, said in a university news release. Two experts who reviewed the study had different reactions to the findings, however. "The less-frequent use of steroids is good news for children, since chronic steroid use can stunt growth," said Dr. Len Horovitz, a pulmonary specialist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. Child asthma ... Read more

Related support groups: Asthma, Asthma - Maintenance, Symbicort, Fluticasone, Flonase, Advair HFA, Advair Diskus, Qvar, Asthma - Acute, Budesonide, Flovent, Entocort, Mometasone, Breo Ellipta, Entocort EC, Veramyst, Acetylcysteine, Beclomethasone, Mucomyst, Alvesco

Health Tip: Create an Asthma Action Plan

Posted 16 May 2016 by Drugs.com

-- An asthma action plan can help people with asthma handle an attack quickly and safely. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends: Creating the action plan with your doctor's assistance. Including in your plan the asthma treatments taken daily, including the type of medications and when taken. Including a plan for long-term asthma control. Including a plan for an asthma attack. Noting when it's appropriate to visit the doctor or go to the emergency room. If the plan is for a child, giving the plan to anyone who cares for that child, including daycare providers and teachers. Read more

Related support groups: Asthma, Albuterol, Asthma - Maintenance, Ventolin, Fluticasone, Ribavirin, Qvar, Asthma - Acute, Combivent, Budesonide, Flovent, Entocort, ProAir HFA, Tobramycin, Mometasone, Proventil, Entocort EC, Acetylcysteine, Beclomethasone, Ventolin HFA

Environmental Concerns Led to Jump in Cost of Asthma Inhalers: Study

Posted 11 May 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 11, 2015 – Federal action to protect the ozone layer has resulted in a dramatic increase in the cost of asthma inhalers in recent years, according to a new study. In 2008, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration banned asthma inhalers containing chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), substances that contribute to the depletion of ozone in the upper atmosphere. Immediately following the ban, the mean cost of asthma inhalers rose from $13.60 per prescription in 2004 to $25 in 2009, said lead study author Dr. Anupam Jena, an assistant professor of health care policy and medicine at Harvard Medical School in Boston. "We're talking about – at its peak – a 100 percent increase, a doubling of out-of-pocket costs," Jena said. The cost of asthma inhalers decreased slightly in the following months, dropping to an average $21 by the end of 2010, Jena said. Their price has hovered around that ... Read more

Related support groups: Asthma, Asthma - Maintenance, Fluticasone, Ribavirin, Qvar, Asthma - Acute, Flovent, Budesonide, Entocort, Tobramycin, Mometasone, Entocort EC, Beclomethasone, Pulmicort Flexhaler, Alvesco, Uceris, Asmanex Twisthaler, Pulmicort Turbuhaler, Allergic Asthma, Ribasphere

Women Hospitalized for Asthma More Often Than Men

Posted 5 May 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 5, 2015 – After seeking medical treatment in the emergency room for an asthma attack, women are much more likely than men to need hospitalization, researchers report. Scientists analyzed the likelihood that 2,000 patients treated in the ER for asthma would need to be admitted to the hospital. Although the men and women had similar risk factors for a flare-up of their condition, women were still 60 percent more likely to be hospitalized, according to the study, published May 5 in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. "It's long been known that after puberty, asthma is more common in women than men," Dr. James Sublett, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, said in a journal news release. "Only 10 percent of the women in this study had been seen by an allergist in the last year," Sublett added. "Those who see an allergist and use ... Read more

Related support groups: Asthma, Asthma - Maintenance, Fluticasone, Qvar, Asthma - Acute, Flovent, Budesonide, Entocort, Mometasone, Bronchial, Entocort EC, Beclomethasone, Pulmicort Flexhaler, Alvesco, Uceris, Asmanex Twisthaler, Pulmicort Turbuhaler, Allergic Asthma, Cromolyn, Flovent HFA

Child's Use of Certain Asthma Drugs Could Shorten Adult Height

Posted 4 Sep 2012 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 3 – Young adults who used inhaled steroid drugs to treat their asthma when they were children are slightly shorter – about half an inch – than those who didn't use the drugs, a new study finds. Researchers followed 943 children, ages 5 to 12, who were treated for mild to moderate asthma for more than four years. The children were divided into three groups. One group took the inhaled corticosteroid medication budesonide (brand names Pulmicort, Rhinocort) twice a day; the second group took the inhaled non-steroid medication nedocromil (brand name Tilade); and the third group took a placebo. All the children took albuterol, a fast-acting drug for relief of acute asthma symptoms, and oral corticosteroids as needed to treat asthma symptoms. The children were followed until they reached their full adult height – age 18 or older for females and age 20 or older for males. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Prednisone, Asthma, Methylprednisolone, Prednisolone, Hydrocortisone, Medrol, Cortisone, Triamcinolone, Dexamethasone, Fluticasone, Betamethasone, Qvar, Budesonide, Flovent, Decadron, Entocort, Mometasone, Solu-Medrol, Entocort EC, Cortef

Asthma and COPD Inhalers That Contain Ozone-depleting CFCs to be Phased Out; Alternative Treatments Available

Posted 14 Apr 2010 by Drugs.com

Asthma and COPD Inhalers That Contain Ozone-depleting CFCs to be Phased Out; Alternative Treatments Available ROCKVILLE, Md., April 13, 2010--The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today announced, in accordance with longstanding U.S. obligations under the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, seven metered-dose inhalers (MDI) used to treat asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) will be gradually removed from the U.S. marketplace. These inhalers contain ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), which are propellants that move medication out of the inhaler and into the lungs of patients. Alternative medications that do not contain CFCs are available. The affected products and their phase out schedule include:   Inhaler Medication Last Date to be manufactured, sold or dispensed in U.S. Manufacturer Tilade Inhaler (nedocromil)  June 14, 2 ... Read more

Related support groups: Combivent, Alupent, Maxair Autohaler, Azmacort, Aerobid, Intal Inhaler, Tilade

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