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Ticagrelor News

Statins Often Interact With Other Heart Drugs

Posted 17 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 – Cholesterol-lowering statins can interact with other drugs prescribed for heart disease. But there are ways to navigate the problem, according to new recommendations from the American Heart Association. Statins are among the mostly widely prescribed drugs in the United States. Roughly one-quarter of Americans age 40 and up are on a statin, according to a 2014 study by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The drugs are prescribed to people who either have atherosclerosis (clogged arteries) or are at risk of it, which means many statin users also take other cardiovascular drugs, the heart association says. The benefits of those drug combinations will generally outweigh the risks, said Barbara Wiggins, a clinical pharmacy specialist in cardiology at the Medical University of South Carolina. But doctors and patients should be aware of how the drugs ... Read more

Related support groups: Warfarin, Coumadin, Amlodipine, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Crestor, Diltiazem, Atorvastatin, Norvasc, Pravastatin, Verapamil, Amiodarone, Digoxin, Nifedipine, Cardizem, Zocor, Azor, Lovastatin, Exforge, Rosuvastatin

Brintellix (vortioxetine) Renamed Trintellix (vortioxetine) in U.S. to Avoid Name Confusion

Posted 4 May 2016 by Drugs.com

Deerfield, Ill., and Osaka, Japan (May 2, 2016) – Takeda Pharmaceuticals U.S.A., Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited (TSE:4502) (collectively “Takeda”), and Lundbeck announced today that Brintellix(vortioxetine) will be marketed in the United States under the new name Trintellix(vortioxetine) starting in June of 2016. The vortioxetine product is a prescription medicine approved to treat Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) in adults. The formulation, indication and dosages of Trintellix remain the same as that of Brintellix. This name change comes after receiving reports of name confusion in the marketplace between Brintellix and the anti-blood clotting therapy Brilinta® (ticagrelor). In response, Takeda and Lundbeck, in coordination with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), determined that a name change would be the best way to minimize future pr ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Brintellix, Brilinta, Vortioxetine, Trintellix, Ticagrelor

FDA Medwatch Alert: Brintellix (vortioxetine): Drug Safety Communication - Brand Name Change to Trintellix, to Avoid Confusion With Antiplatelet Drug Brilinta (ticagrelor)

Posted 4 May 2016 by Drugs.com

ISSUE:  FDA has approved a brand name change for the antidepressant Brintellix (vortioxetine) to decrease the risk of prescribing and dispensing errors resulting from name confusion with the blood-thinning medicine Brilinta (ticagrelor). The new brand name of the drug will be Trintellix, and it is expected to be available starting in June 2016. No other changes will be made to the label or packaging, and the medicine is exactly the same. Because of the lag time associated with manufacturing bottles with the new brand name, health care professionals and patients may continue to see bottles labeled with the brand name Brintellix during the transition period. In a July 2015 MedWatch Alert, FDA warned that name confusion between Brintellix and Brilinta had resulted in prescribing and dispensing errors since Brintellix was approved in September 2013. Due to continued reports of name ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Brintellix, Brilinta, Vortioxetine, Ticagrelor

FDA Approves Expanded Indication for Brilinta to Include Long-Term Use in Patients with a History of Heart Attack

Posted 8 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

Thursday, 3 September 2015 – AstraZeneca today announced that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Brilinta (ticagrelor) tablets at a new 60mg dose to be used in patients with a history of heart attack beyond the first year. With this expanded indication, Brilinta is now approved to reduce the rate of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction (MI, also known as heart attack) and stroke in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) or a history of MI. Brilinta is an oral antiplatelet treatment that works by inhibiting platelet activation and was first approved by the FDA in July 2011 on the basis of data from the PLATO study. For at least the first 12 months following ACS, it is superior to clopidogrel and is the first and only oral antiplatelet to demonstrate superior reductions in cardiovascular death. Brilinta also reduces the rate of stent thrombosis in ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Attack, Brilinta, Acute Coronary Syndrome, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ticagrelor

FDA Medwatch Alert: Brintellix (vortioxetine) and Brilinta (ticagrelor): Drug Safety Communication - Name Confusion

Posted 2 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

ISSUE: FDA is warning health care professionals and patients that reports of confusion between the antidepressant Brintellix and anti-blood clotting medication Brilinta have resulted in the wrong medication being prescribed or dispensed. FDA determined that the main reason for the confusion between these two medications is the similarity of their brand (proprietary) names. None of the reports indicates that a patient ingested the wrong medication; however, reports of prescribing and dispensing errors continue.  BACKGROUND: Brintellix (vortioxetine) is used to treat a certain type of depression called major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults.  It is in a class of antidepressants called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Brilinta (ticagrelor) is an antiplatelet, anti-blood clotting medication used to lower the risk of having another heart attack, or dying from a heart prob ... Read more

Related support groups: Brintellix, Brilinta, Vortioxetine, Ticagrelor

Wide Variations Seen in U.S. Stroke Care

Posted 7 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 7, 2015 – Americans' odds of receiving a drug that can halt strokes in progress may vary widely depending on their ZIP codes, a new study finds. Experts said the findings, reported in the July issue of the journal Stroke, help verify what everyone has suspected: There are disparities in emergency stroke care across the United States, specifically in the use of a clot-busting drug called tissue plasminogen activator, or tPA. And the magnitude of the disparities was "striking," said senior researcher Dr. James Burke, of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. In 20 percent of hospital markets, not a single stroke patient received tPA over four years, Burke's team found. In others, up to 14 percent of stroke patients received the drug. The big question is: Why? "We really don't know what's driving this," Burke said. The hospital markets that most often gave tPA were ... Read more

Related support groups: Aspirin, Plavix, Ischemic Stroke, Clopidogrel, Transient Ischemic Attack, Effient, Aggrenox, Brilinta, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Ecotrin, Cilostazol, Bayer Aspirin, Pletal, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis, Dipyridamole, Prasugrel, Ticagrelor, Persantine, Bufferin, Activase

FDA Approves New Crushing Option for the Administration of Brilinta

Posted 30 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

March 30, 2015 – AstraZeneca (NYSE: AZN) today announced that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a new administration option for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients who are unable to swallow Brilinta 90 mg tablets whole. Unlike other P2Y12 inhibitors, Brilinta has FDA approval to be crushed and administered in water by swallowing or via nasogastric tube. “We know that some patients who experience a heart attack are unable to swallow medications whole, yet it is important for these patients to receive and continue their oral antiplatelet therapy,” said Steven Zelenkofske, DO, Vice President, US Medical Affairs, Cardiovascular, AstraZeneca. “This label update, like the recent announcement of the PEGASUS TIMI-54 results, is an example of our ongoing commitment to addressing important unmet patient needs through advancing our understanding of Brilinta.” In the gener ... Read more

Related support groups: Brilinta, Acute Coronary Syndrome, Ticagrelor

Newer Blood Thinner May Improve Outcomes for Heart Attack Survivors

Posted 15 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, March 14, 2015 – Long-term use of the newer anti-clotting drug Brilinta cut heart attack survivors' future risk of heart attack, stroke or heart-related death, a new study found. The study was funded by Brilinta's maker, AstraZeneca, and was scheduled for presentation Saturday in San Diego at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology (ACC). One expert not connected to the new study said the findings are encouraging, even though Brilinta typically costs more than older, generic blood thinners. Long-term cost savings – due to Brilinta users avoiding more heart attacks or strokes – "might help offset the upfront cost of Brilinta compared to generic anti-clotting agents," explained Dr. David Friedman, chief of heart failure services at North Shore-LIJ's Franklin Hospital in Valley Stream, N.Y. The new study was led by Dr. Marc Sabatine, a cardiologist at Brigham ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Brilinta, Ticagrelor

Guidelines Issued for New Blood Thinner Brilinta

Posted 16 Jul 2012 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 16 – The new blood-thinning drug Brilinta should be considered along with older drugs to treat patients with unstable angina, according to updated guidelines. Unstable angina occurs when a partially blocked coronary artery deprives the heart of blood and oxygen. The updated guidelines were issued jointly by the American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines and the American College of Cardiology Foundation. "We have put it on equal footing with two other [blood-thinning] medications: clopidogrel (Plavix) and prasugrel (Effient)," lead author Dr. Hani Jneid, assistant professor of medicine and director of interventional cardiology research at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, said in an American Heart Association news release. The new guidelines state that Brilinta (ticagrelor), which was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2011, should ... Read more

Related support groups: Plavix, Angina, Clopidogrel, Effient, Brilinta, Prasugrel, Ticagrelor

Rx for Heart Patients: Healthier Living, Medication

Posted 3 Nov 2011 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 3 – A healthy lifestyle and appropriate medications can help people with heart disease live longer and avoid a heart attack or stroke, according to new guidelines from the American College of Cardiology Foundation and the American Heart Association. Following the updated recommendations can also improve quality of life, reduce the need for surgical procedures to open blocked arteries and lower the likelihood of a repeat heart attack or stroke if you've suffered one already, the authors said. "The full implementation of these cardiovascular protective therapies into clinical practice can markedly reduce the risk of death, disability and health care expenditures due to cardiovascular disease," said Dr. Gregg Fonarow, professor of cardiology at the University of California, Los Angeles and a spokesman for the American Heart Association. For the first time, the guidelines ... Read more

Related support groups: Aspirin, Heart Disease, Plavix, Smoking, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Smoking Cessation, Clopidogrel, Effient, Myocardial Infarction, Brilinta, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Ecotrin, Bayer Aspirin, Prasugrel, Ticagrelor, FluLaval, Afluria, Fluzone, Bufferin

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Acute Coronary Syndrome, Prevention of Atherothrombotic Events

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Brilinta

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