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Thyroid Disease News

Researchers Pinpoint More Genes Linked to Vitiligo

Posted 12 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 – Researchers say they've identified more genes linked to the autoimmune disease vitiligo, which causes patches of white skin and hair. An international team of scientists pinpointed 23 new locations on the genome associated with susceptibility to vitiligo. That doubles the number of known genes connected with vitiligo, the researchers said. Vitiligo may be related to several other autoimmune diseases, including thyroid disease, pernicious anemia, rheumatoid arthritis, adult-onset type 1 diabetes, Addison's disease and lupus, the scientists said. Learning more about the causes of vitiligo could lead to treatment breakthroughs for the other conditions, the researchers said. They found links between genes involved in vitiligo and some of the other conditions. While it's unclear whether this indicates shared causes, the findings suggest promising areas for future ... Read more

Related support groups: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Thyroid Disease, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Diabetes, Type 1, Lupus Erythematosus, Addison's Disease, Vitiligo, Diabetes Mellitus, Diagnosis and Investigation

Can You Blame Your Headaches on Your Thyroid?

Posted 2 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 29, 2016 – People with migraines and other headache disorders have a greater risk of a thyroid disease known as hypothyroidism, a new study suggests. Hypothyroidism occurs when the body doesn't produce sufficient amounts of thyroid hormone. This can cause mood swings, weight gain, hair loss, fatigue, constipation and irregular menstrual cycles, according to researchers at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. The study included more than 8,400 people. The volunteers were followed for 20 years as part of a medical monitoring project. People with pre-existing headache disorders – such as cluster or tension headaches – had a 21 percent higher risk of hypothyroidism, the investigators found. And people with a possible migraine disorder had a 41 percent greater risk. The findings suggest that people with migraines are particularly susceptible to hypothyroidism. ... Read more

Related support groups: Headache, Migraine, Thyroid Disease, Migraine Prevention, Hashimoto's Disease, Cluster Headaches, Hyperthyroidism, Migraine Prophylaxis, New Daily Persistent Headache, Goiter, Chronic Lymphocytic Thyroiditis

Thyroid Levels in High-Normal Range May Be Linked to Cardiac Arrest

Posted 6 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 6, 2016 – People with higher levels of thyroid hormone in their bloodstream may be at greater risk of sudden cardiac death, even if those levels aren't abnormally high, a new study suggests. "Our study shows that the risk of sudden cardiac death increases with higher thyroid hormone levels, even in the normal range," said lead researcher Dr. Layal Chaker, a research fellow in endocrinology and epidemiology at Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam in the Netherlands. Sudden cardiac death occurs when a person's heart stops due to a malfunction in the electrical system that drives the heartbeat. Researchers found that people with thyroid hormone levels at the high end of the normal range were 2.5 times more likely to die from sudden cardiac death, compared with people at the lower end of the range. In addition, the 10-year risk of sudden cardiac death was four times ... Read more

Related support groups: Thyroid Disease, Hyperthyroidism, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Thyrotoxicosis

Restrictive Diets May Cause Thyroid Troubles in Young Kids

Posted 10 May 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 10, 2016 – Two cases of children who developed iodine deficiency highlight the risks of putting too many restrictions on young kids' diets, researchers say. The doctors said that the children – aged 2 and 5 – developed iodine deficiency because their diets lacked salt, dairy products, bread and other sources of the mineral. Iodine deficiency is common in developing countries, but was virtually eliminated in the United States after iodized salt was introduced almost a century ago. However, it can still happen if a child's diet is strictly limited, said study author Dr. Brigid Gregg. She is a pediatric endocrinologist at the University of Michigan's C.S. Mott Children's Hospital. "Parents should be aware that if they're really restricting the foods their children eat, iodine deficiency is a possibility," Gregg said. The body needs iodine to make thyroid hormones, which ... Read more

Related support groups: Thyroid Disease, Hypothyroidism, Underactive Thyroid, Iodine, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation and Deficiency, Celiac Disease, Goiter, Lugol's, Lugols Strong Iodine, Lugols Solution, Strong Iodine, Iodine Mild, Iodine/Potassium Iodide, Iodine Tincture

Thyroid Cancer Cases in U.S. Level Off, Perhaps Reflecting Diagnostic Changes

Posted 15 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 14, 2016 – Fewer thyroid cancers are diagnosed in the United States now than in the recent past, perhaps signaling a change in physician practices, a new study says. And many thyroid growths won't even be called "cancer" any more, according to another new report. The tripling of thyroid cancer cases over the past 30 years "used to be a mystery," said Dr. Luc Morris, lead author of a report published online April 14 in the journal JAMA Otolaryngology--Head & Neck Surgery. But recently, many researchers attributed the rise largely to technological advances that allow doctors to identify and biopsy small, harmless nodules in the thyroid gland, said Morris. He is a surgical oncologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. "Up to 30 percent of healthy persons have small cancers in their thyroid glands, and nearly all of these would not go on to cause ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Thyroid Disease, Hyperthyroidism, Thyroid Cancer, Thyroid Tumor

Surgeons' Experience Matters With Thyroid Removal

Posted 28 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 25, 2016 – If you need your thyroid gland removed, choosing a surgeon who performs more than 25 thyroid removals a year might minimize your risks, a new study suggests. "This is a very technical operation, and patients should feel empowered to ask their surgeons how many procedures they do each year, on average," said study senior author Dr. Julie Sosa, chief of endocrine surgery at Duke University, in Durham, N.C. "Surgeons have an ethical responsibility to report their case numbers. While this is not a guarantee of a positive outcome, choosing a more experienced surgeon certainly can improve the odds that the patient will do well," Sosa said in a university news release. The thyroid, located at the base of the throat, produces hormones that regulate your metabolism. Thyroid removal (thyroidectomy) is not uncommon and often done due to cancer or enlargement, Sosa and her ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Thyroid Disease, Thyroid Cancer, Head & Neck Surgery, Thyroid Storm, Myxedema Coma, Thyroid Tumor

Surgeon's Experience Tied to Success of Thyroid Removal: Study

Posted 8 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 8, 2015 – Patients who undergo thyroid removal may be less likely to suffer complications if their surgeon performs many such surgeries each year, a new study says. Removal of the thyroid gland, located at the base of the neck, is a common operation. More than 72,300 total thyroidectomies are performed in the United States annually, usually to treat thyroid cancer or benign thyroid diseases, the study authors said. The authors examined data from nearly 17,000 American adults who had their thyroid removed between 1998 and 2009. About half these patients had cancer, and the other half had thyroid disease. Overall, 6 percent of the patients had complications after their surgery, such as damage to voice box nerves, excessive bleeding, poor wound healing, breathing or heart problems, hormone deficiency and death. Complication rates were 4 percent among patients whose surgeon ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Thyroid Disease, Hypothyroidism, Underactive Thyroid, Hashimoto's Disease, Hypothyroidism - After Thyroid Removal, Hyperthyroidism, Thyroid Cancer, TSH Suppression, Goiter, Thyroid Suppression Test, Graves' Disease, Head & Neck Surgery, Thyroid Storm, Chronic Lymphocytic Thyroiditis, Myxedema Coma, Thyroid Tumor, Thyrotoxicosis, Myxedema, Thyroid Hemorrhage/Infarction

Better Imaging Scans Catching More Thyroid Cancers: Study

Posted 11 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 11, 2015 – Advanced imaging technology has helped doctors spot more cases of thyroid cancer over the past decade, a new study finds. But the Mayo Clinic researchers warn that nearly one-third of these cases involve people with low-risk tumors. "We are spotting more cancers, but they are cancers that are not likely to cause harm," study author Dr. Juan Brito Campana, an assistant professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., said in a Mayo news release. "Their treatment, however, is likely to cause harm, as most thyroid cancers are treated by surgically removing all or part of the thyroid gland. This is a risky procedure that can damage a patient's vocal cords or leave them with lifelong calcium deficiencies," he said. Treatment for thyroid cancer can also be a financial burden for patients and their families, Brito Campana added. In 2013 alone, the total ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Thyroid Disease, Thyroid Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Thyroid Tumor, Solid Tumors, Body Imaging, Head Imaging

Even Slightly Overactive Thyroid Linked to Higher Fracture Risk

Posted 26 May 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 26, 2015 – Even people who only have a mildly overactive thyroid gland face an elevated risk for fractures in the hips or spinal area, a new review suggests. "Subclinical hyperthyroidism" is a condition in which an overactive thyroid gland produces too much of the hormones that control basic metabolism but there is a lack of symptoms, and hormone readings are normal in blood tests. Past research has shown that more pronounced cases of hyperthyroidism are associated with a raised fracture risk, the reviewers explained. But it hasn't been entirely clear whether the same holds true for milder forms of the condition. The Swiss reviewers looked at 13 past studies involving more than 70,000 patients to try to answer that question. "There have been several studies that have previously suggested an increased risk for fractures, but up until now it wasn't clear if it was a real ... Read more

Related support groups: Thyroid Disease, Hyperthyroidism, Fracture, bone, Graves' Disease, Prevention of Fractures

Study Questions Close Monitoring of Thyroid Growths

Posted 3 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 3, 2015 – Harmless growths in the thyroid gland are common, and a new study suggests they don't need to be monitored as closely as current guidelines recommend. The thyroid is a gland in the neck that secretes hormones involved in metabolism. According to the American Thyroid Association, by age 60 about half of all people develop a thyroid nodule, an abnormal lump of cells within the gland. Most nodules cause no symptoms, the association says, and they are only detected by chance, when someone has an imaging test for an unrelated reason – such as a CT scan of the chest or an ultrasound of the carotid arteries in the neck. If the nodule is large enough, doctors will do a biopsy – using a fine needle to extract some cells – to see whether the lump is cancerous. More than 90 percent of the nodules are deemed benign, or harmless, the association says. "But the question ... Read more

Related support groups: Thyroid Disease, Thyroid Tumor

Childhood Abuse Linked to Later Thyroid Problems for Women

Posted 2 Aug 2013 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 2 – Women who suffered physical abuse during childhood are at increased risk for thyroid problems, according to a new study. "We found a significant association with thyroid disorders for women who were abused during childhood," lead author Esme Fuller Thomson, professor and chair at the University of Toronto's Faculty of Social Work, said in a university news release. "We originally thought the link would be explained by factors such as daily stress, smoking or alcohol abuse – characteristics associated with both childhood physical abuse and thyroid disorders – but even after adjusting for 14 potential explanatory factors, women who had been physically abused in childhood had 40 percent higher odds of thyroid disorders than their non-abused peers," Fuller Thomson said. Researchers analyzed data from about 13,000 Canadian adults. More than 1,000 of the women reported ... Read more

Related support groups: Thyroid Disease

Chemicals in Carpets, Cosmetics Tied to Thyroid Problems

Posted 19 Jul 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 17 – Exposure to a class of chemicals used to make a wide range of consumer products can cause changes in thyroid function, according to a new study. People have widespread exposure to perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs), which are used to manufacture items such as fabrics, carpets, cosmetics and paper coatings. These chemicals break down very slowly and take a long time to leave the body. For this study, researchers analyzed data from more than 1,100 people who took part in the 2007-2008 and 2009-2010 U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The study looked at levels of four different PFCs as well as participants' thyroid function. Along with finding that having higher levels of PFCs in the body can alter thyroid function in both men and women, the researchers also found that PFCs may increase the risk of mild hypothyroidism in women. Hypothyroidism occurs ... Read more

Related support groups: Thyroid Disease

Iodine Supplements May Be Too Much of a Good Thing

Posted 12 Jun 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 12 – Taking high doses of iodine and kelp supplements can be hazardous to your health, warns the American Thyroid Association. Adequate iodine intake is required for normal function of the thyroid, a gland in the neck that produces hormones that control the rate of many bodily activities. But too much iodine can lead to thyroid dysfunction. Daily supplements containing more than 500 micrograms of iodine should be avoided, the association recommended. Many iodine, potassium iodide and kelp supplements contain iodine amounts that are up to several thousand times higher than the daily tolerable upper limit of 1,100 micrograms per day, they noted. The recommended daily limit for iodine intake is 150 micrograms for men and non-pregnant women. The recommended daily intake is 220 to 250 micrograms for pregnant women and 250 to 290 micrograms for women who are breast-feeding. ... Read more

Related support groups: Thyroid Disease, Iodine

Thyroid Disorders Tied to Complications in Pregnancy

Posted 29 May 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 29 – Pregnant women with thyroid disorders are at greater risk for premature delivery and other pregnancy complications, a new study indicates. Researchers caution that these complications could have both short-term and long-term health consequences for women and their babies. Thyroid disease occurs when the thyroid gland – located at the front of the neck – doesn't supply the proper amount of hormones needed by the body. "In the United States, at least 80,000 pregnant women each year have thyroid diseases," study lead author, Dr. Tuija Mannisto, of the U.S. National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), said in a news release from the Endocrine Society. "These women are at increased risk of having serious adverse pregnancy outcomes, including hypertension and preterm birth. They also have a higher rate of labor inductions and other birth ... Read more

Related support groups: Thyroid Disease

People With Type 1 Diabetes at Risk of Thyroid Disease

Posted 15 Mar 2013 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 15 – People who have type 1 diabetes are more likely than others to develop an autoimmune thyroid condition. Though estimates vary, the rate of thyroid disease – either under- or overactive thyroid – may be as high as 30 percent in people with type 1 diabetes, according to Dr. Betul Hatipoglu, an endocrinologist with the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio. And the odds are especially high for women, whether they have diabetes or not, she said, noting that women are eight times more likely than men to develop thyroid disease. "I tell my patients thyroid disease and type 1 diabetes are sister diseases, like branches of a tree," she said. "Each is different, but the root is the same. And, that root is autoimmunity, where the immune system is attacking your own healthy endocrine parts." Hatipoglu also noted that autoimmune diseases often run in families. A grandparent may have had ... Read more

Related support groups: Thyroid Disease, Hypothyroidism, Underactive Thyroid, Diabetes, Type 1, Hyperthyroidism

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Underactive Thyroid, Hypothyroidism, Chronic Lymphocytic Thyroiditis, Hashimoto's Disease, Hyperthyroidism, Thyroid Cancer, Goiter, Thyroid Tumor, Thyrotoxicosis, Thyroid Hemorrhage / Infarction