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Take Heart, Coffee Lovers, Morning Joe May Help Your Ticker

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 13, 2017 – Coffee fiends, rejoice: Every cup of joe you guzzle could drive down your risk for heart problems, a new preliminary study suggests. "Drinking that cup of coffee that you love may be associated with decreased risk of stroke, heart failure and coronary heart disease," said lead researcher Laura Stevens. She's a data scientist for the American Heart Association's Institute for Precision Cardiovascular Medicine in Dallas. Each cup of coffee consumed a week could decrease your risk of heart failure by 7 percent, stroke by 8 percent and heart disease by 5 percent, according to a sophisticated analysis of data from long-term heart studies. In a more surprising finding, the research also suggested that red meat might be linked to lower risk of heart failure and stroke, said Stevens, who is also a doctoral student at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in ... Read more

Related support groups: Ischemic Stroke, Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Transient Ischemic Attack, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis, Acute Coronary Syndrome

'Upside' to Diabetes Really Isn't

Posted 13 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 13, 2017 – Type 2 diabetes can reduce your chances for a rare but potentially fatal weakness of blood vessels, a new study says. But while this may sound like good news, it's not. Swedish investigators found that type 2 diabetes significantly decreases the long-term risks of aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection, two conditions that can lead to internal bleeding due to rupture of blood vessels. But the mechanism that reduces risk for these rare conditions also increases your risk of developing hardened arteries, a much more serious health problem that can lead to heart attack and stroke. "We have to make sure people don't think, 'Oh, good, I have diabetes type 2, this is good news – because it's not," said Dr. Derek Brinster, director of aortic surgery at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "You are at high risk if you have diabetes type 2 for dying earlier than you ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Aortic Aneurysm, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis, Ischemic Heart Disease, Aortic Insufficiency

Uptick in U.S. Stroke Deaths Sets Off Alarms: CDC

Posted 6 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 6, 2017 – Progress in preventing stroke deaths in the United States has stalled after 40 years of decline, and may even be reversing, government health officials say. Stroke deaths increased significantly among Hispanics and in the South between 2013 and 2015, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Wednesday. "This report is a wake-up call because 80 percent of strokes are preventable," said lead author Quanhe Yang, a CDC research scientist. "More than ever, we need to direct our efforts to reduce stroke risk factors and improve the quality of care," he said. According to prior research, high blood pressure is the most important preventable and treatable risk factor for stroke. But high cholesterol, smoking and physical inactivity play a role, too. While stroke death rates declined 38 percent from 2000 to 2015, researchers said the average decline ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Obesity, Hypertension, Ischemic Stroke, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis, Hypertensive Heart Disease

There May Be a Big Medical Upside to Being Short

Posted 6 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 5, 2017 – There may be at least one advantage to being short: a lower risk for dangerous blood clots in the veins, a new study shows. These clots, called venous thromboembolisms, include blockages known as DVTs (deep vein thrombosis), which typically start in the legs and can travel to the lungs, raising a person's odds for stroke. Sometimes DVTs occur after long-haul flights, so they've been dubbed "economy class syndrome." But new research suggests a slight advantage for shorter people in avoiding the clots. Why the effect? "It could just be that because taller individuals have longer leg veins there is more surface area where problems can occur," theorized study lead author Dr. Bengt Zoller. "There is also more gravitational pressure in leg veins of taller persons that can increase the risk of blood flow slowing or temporarily stopping," noted Zoller, an associate ... Read more

Related support groups: Plan B, Blood Disorders, Nexplanon, Mirena, Depo-Provera, NuvaRing, Provera, Sprintec, Implanon, Ortho Tri-Cyclen, Microgestin Fe 1/20, Tri-Sprintec, Yasmin, Plan B One-Step, Loestrin 24 Fe, Ortho Evra, Ischemic Stroke, TriNessa, Mononessa, Lutera

Calcium in Arteries May Best Predict Risk of Heart Attack, Stroke

Posted 1 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 31, 2017 – People with no calcium buildup in their arteries seem to have a significantly lower risk of heart attack and stroke, a new study finds. Calcium collects in the arteries after plaque builds up and hardens over time, the study authors explained. For the study, researchers looked at nearly 6,200 people, aged 45 to 84, and found that those whose arteries were free of calcium deposits had a less than 3 percent chance of heart attack or stroke over the next decade. That's well below the 7.5 percent heart risk level used as a guideline to begin treatment with cholesterol-lowering statin drugs, the researchers noted. The study finding held true even among people who had other risk factors, such as diabetes, high blood pressure or high levels of bad cholesterol. About half of the study participants showed no calcium deposits in their arteries. "The event rates when ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Hypertension, Heart Attack, High Cholesterol, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Atorvastatin, Crestor, Pravastatin, Insulin Resistance, Lovastatin, Zocor, Pre-Diabetes, Myocardial Infarction, Rosuvastatin, Red Yeast Rice, Pravachol, Diabetes Mellitus, Livalo

Young Adults May Be Ignoring High Blood Pressure

Posted 28 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 28, 2017 – High blood pressure doesn't seem to be as much of a concern for young American adults as it is for their 40 and older counterparts, a new study finds. And, that seems to be especially true for young adult men, the study authors said. "While hypertension awareness, treatment and control have improved overall since the early 2000s, all three remain worse in young adults – those aged 18-39," said senior study author Dr. Andrew Moran. An assistant professor at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City, he made his comments in a news release from the American Heart Association. The heart association defines high blood pressure as 140/90 or higher. High blood pressure can lead to heart attack and stroke. The study included information from eight surveys completed sometime between 1999-2014. More than 41,000 Americans participated in the surveys. They ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Obesity, Hypertension, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Prevention of Falls

New Drug, Canakinumab, May Fight Heart Disease in Whole New Way

Posted 28 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 28, 2017 – Move over, statins: New research finds that a medication aimed at dampening the body's inflammatory response may be a new tool to curb heart disease. The findings were presented Sunday at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress in Barcelona, Spain, and published in two major medical journals, The Lancet and the New England Journal of Medicine. The trial focused on a new drug called canakinumab, which lowered by 15 percent the overall rate of heart events such as heart attack, stroke and cardiovascular death in people who'd already had a heart attack. The people in the study also had high levels of a compound called C-reactive protein in their blood – a marker that is indicative of a heightened inflammatory response. For years, heart researchers have wondered if a drug that lowered inflammation might help curb heart disease. Cardiologists had mixed ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, High Cholesterol, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Atorvastatin, Crestor, Pravastatin, Lovastatin, Zocor, Myocardial Infarction, Rosuvastatin, Hypertriglyceridemia, Red Yeast Rice, Pravachol, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Livalo, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis, Hyperlipoproteinemia

Undiagnosed Heart Condition 'AFib' May Be Common, Study Suggests

Posted 26 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, Aug. 26, 2017 – Many people at risk for atrial fibrillation probably do have the irregular heart rhythm but have not been diagnosed, a new study reports. Nearly 1 out of 3 patients in the study had undetected atrial fibrillation that was caught only through the use of long-term cardiac monitor implants, researchers say. Based on these results, it's likely there's probably a lot more undetected atrial fibrillation among seniors, said lead researcher Dr. James Reiffel. He's a cardiologist and professor at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City. "Continuous monitoring of such patients, as we did, can detect otherwise unsuspected AF, which can lead to treatment before complications arise," Reiffel said. "When monitored for 18 months, almost one in three patients had AF detected, as did 40 percent by 30 months." Atrial fibrillation involves ... Read more

Related support groups: Warfarin, Atrial Fibrillation, Coumadin, Ischemic Stroke, Xarelto, Pradaxa, Eliquis, Lovenox, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Heparin, Rivaroxaban, Apixaban, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Fragmin, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis, Clexane, Enoxaparin, Arixtra, Hep-Pak, Dalteparin

Meth Abuse Could Up Stroke Risk in Younger Users

Posted 24 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 24, 2017 – Younger adults who use methamphetamine may be at greater risk for stroke, a new review suggests. With use of the stimulant increasing, particularly in more potent forms, doctors in many countries are seeing more meth-related disease and harms, the Australian study authors said. This is especially true among younger people, who are the major users of the drug. "It is likely that methamphetamine abuse is making a disproportionate contribution to the increased incidence of stroke among young people observed over recent years," said researchers led by Julia Lappin. She's with the National Drug and Alcohol Research Center at the University of New South Wales in Sydney. These strokes can lead to disabilities or death, she and her colleagues pointed out. For the review, Lappin's team analyzed 77 studies that investigated the link between methamphetamine use and ... Read more

Related support groups: Ischemic Stroke, Methamphetamine, Transient Ischemic Attack, Desoxyn, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis, Desoxyn Gradumet

Stroke Rates Drop for U.S. Men, But Not Women

Posted 10 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 9, 2017 – The overall rate of strokes is declining in the United States, but appears to be going down mostly in men, a new study finds. "Our findings suggest that the decreases in rates of stroke over time are primarily driven by decreased stroke rates in men," said lead researcher Dr. Tracy Madsen. That makes doctors wonder why American women aren't seeing the same benefits from stroke prevention. "It may be that stroke prevention strategies are not as effective in women compared with men; for example, future research should investigate the possibility that stroke risk factors like elevated blood pressure, cholesterol and diabetes are more severe or are not controlled as well in women," Madsen said. Madsen is an assistant professor of emergency medicine at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, in Rhode Island. "Stroke is a debilitating yet preventable ... Read more

Related support groups: Ischemic Stroke, Transient Ischemic Attack, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis, Intracranial Hemorrhage

Is Shingles Tied to Heart, Stroke Risk?

Posted 4 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 4, 2017 – Shingles may be tied to an increased risk for heart disease, a new study suggests. About one-third of Americans will develop shingles in their lifetime. The painful skin rash can occur in anyone who's had chickenpox, and the risk increases with age. The new study looked at 2003-2013 medical records for more than 23,000 people in South Korea who had shingles. The researchers also reviewed data on a similar number of people without shingles. They found the shingles group had a 59 percent higher risk of heart attack and a 35 percent higher risk of stroke than the others. Stroke risk was highest among those under 40. The risks of both stroke and heart attack were highest the first year after the onset of shingles and decreased with time, according to the study. The results appear in a research letter published July 3 in the Journal of the American College of ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, Herpes Zoster, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis, Varicella-Zoster, Varicella Virus Vaccine, Ischemic Heart Disease, Measles Virus Vaccine/Mumps Virus Vaccine/Rubella Virus Vaccine/Varicella Virus Vaccine, ProQuad, Varicella-Zoster - Prophylaxis, Varivax

For Many, Friends Are Key to Happiness in Old Age

Posted 29 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 29, 2017 – As you age, the friends you keep wield an ever-greater impact on your health and sense of happiness, new research reveals. They may even outstrip family in terms of the sway they have over you, according to the pair of new studies. Lead investigator William Chopik cited several reasons why friendships might pack a bigger punch than blood relationships when it comes to influencing health and well-being. "We spend leisure time with friends. We freely choose to continue relationships with friends," said Chopik, an assistant professor of psychology at Michigan State University. If the friendships last until older adulthood, "clearly these are good friendships," he added. "As we age, we prune away at some of the friendships that are more superficial and acquaintance-like," he said. That means that as older adults, "we're left with the ones that are deeper and make ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Cancer, Major Depressive Disorder, Cough, Osteoarthritis, Hypertension, Ischemic Stroke, High Cholesterol, Bronchitis, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Maintenance, Transient Ischemic Attack, Dysthymia, Pre-Diabetes, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Acute, Diabetes Mellitus, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Bronchiectasis, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis

More Americans Are Walking for Exercise

Posted 29 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 29, 2017 – Call it a step in the right direction: More and more Americans are trying to walk their way to better health. The number of adults who took up walking for exercise or as a way to get from place to place increased significantly between 2005 and 2015, federal health officials reported Thursday. During that time, the percentage of women who walk increased from 57 percent to 65 percent. Among men, the percentage increased from 54 percent to 63 percent, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "People who are physically active have a lower risk of many chronic diseases – like heart disease, stroke and depression – and it supports the healthy aging process for older adults," said study lead author Emily Ussery, a CDC epidemiologist. On the downside, although more people are walking, the increase among men has stalled a bit in recent years, ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Heart Disease, Dysthymia, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis, Ischemic Heart Disease

Heavy Teens May Be Setting Themselves Up for a Stroke

Posted 28 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 28, 2017 – As more young adults are hospitalized for stroke each year in the United States, new research from Sweden hints at a reason why: Teens who become overweight during adolescence appear to face a higher stroke risk later. "According to our results, avoiding excessive BMI increase between 8 and 20 years of age would lower the risk of stroke and cardiovascular diseases," said study author Dr. Jenny Kindblom, of the University of Gothenburg. BMI, or body mass index, is a measure of body fat. The investigators noted that excessive weight gain during puberty may lead to elevated blood pressure, a strong risk factor for stroke. "We see a strong association between BMI change during puberty and a diagnosis of hypertension [high blood pressure]," said study co-author Dr. Claes Ohlsson, from the same university. Overall, stroke rates in the United States have declined ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Obesity, Hypertension, Weight Loss, Ischemic Stroke, Transient Ischemic Attack, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis

Early Care by Cardiologist May Lower Stroke Risk for A-Fib Patients

Posted 26 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 26, 2017 – Patients with a common heart rhythm disorder who receive a cardiologist's care soon after diagnosis are less likely to suffer a stroke, a new study finds. Atrial fibrillation, or A-fib, is an irregular, often rapid heart rate that increases the risk of stroke and other complications. It affects between 3 million and 5 million Americans. Researchers from Stanford University School of Medicine analyzed data on more than 184,000 people diagnosed with atrial fibrillation between 2004 and 2012. Within 90 days of diagnosis, 40 percent were cared for by a cardiologist and 60 percent by a primary care doctor only. Patients seen by cardiologists had a 9 percent lower risk of stroke and an 11 percent lower risk of early death, the study found. The lower stroke risk probably resulted from a higher rate of prescriptions for blood-thinning drugs that prevent blood clots, ... Read more

Related support groups: Atrial Fibrillation, Arrhythmia, Transient Ischemic Attack, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis

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