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Healthier Diet, Less Salt: The Recipe to Beat High Blood Pressure

Posted 10 days ago by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Nov. 12, 2017 - Cutting back on salt, along with following the highly recommended "DASH" diet, can beat back high blood pressure in adults, new research shows. After just a month, the results for people adopting this strategy were "striking and reinforce the importance of dietary changes" for those with problematic blood pressure. So says a team of researchers led by Dr. Stephen Juraschek, of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. Millions of Americans fight a daily battle with high blood pressure, which can greatly increase their odds for stroke and other heart events. What's the best dietary strategy to lower those blood pressure numbers? One key factor that's long been linked to blood pressure is salt (sodium) intake. In the new study, 412 people with high blood pressure (or in danger of high blood pressure) were assigned to one of three daily salt-intake regimens. ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Sodium Chloride, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, HalfLytely and Bisacodyl, Hyper-Sal, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Dextrose/Sodium Chloride, Ayr Saline Nasal, Rhinaris, Potassium Chloride/Sodium Chloride, Saline Nasal Mist, Thermotabs, SaltAire, Saline Mist, Salinex, Broncho Saline

Want to Avoid Salt? Turn Up the Spice

Posted 31 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 31, 2017 – If your taste buds lean toward spicy, you might be doing your heart a favor, new research suggests. Spicy foods may increase salt sensitivity, thereby dampening the desire to consume heart-harming salty food, researchers in China say. "High salt intake increases blood pressure and contributes to cardiovascular disease," said study author Dr. Zhiming Zhu. "Thus, reducing salt intake is very important for health. "We find that the enjoyment of spicy foods significantly reduced individual salt preference, daily salt intake and blood pressure," he added. Zhu is director of Daping Hospital's Center for Hypertension and Metabolic Diseases at Third Military Medical University in Chongqing. The research team conducted a mouse study alongside a human trial of more than 600 Chinese adults. Both correlated blood pressure levels with intake of spicy and salty dishes. Foods ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Dietary Supplementation, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation and Deficiency, Sodium Chloride, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, HalfLytely and Bisacodyl, Hyper-Sal, Dextrose/Sodium Chloride, Ayr Saline Nasal, Rhinaris, Potassium Chloride/Sodium Chloride, Saline Nasal Mist, Thermotabs, Hypertensive Heart Disease, SaltAire, Saline Mist, Salinex, Broncho Saline

Increasing Salt Intake Tied to Diabetes Risk

Posted 15 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 14, 2017 – High levels of salt consumption may increase an adult's risk of developing diabetes, researchers say. The new study included data from a few thousand people in Sweden. The findings showed that salt intake was associated with an average 65 percent increase in the risk of developing type 2 diabetes for each 2.5 extra grams of salt (slightly less than half a teaspoon) consumed per day. People with the highest salt intake (about 1.25 teaspoons of salt or higher) were 72 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those with the lowest intake, the investigators found. The study, led by Bahareh Rasouli of the Institute of Environmental Medicine at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, was scheduled for presentation Thursday at the annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Lisbon, Portugal. The current study didn't look ... Read more

Related support groups: Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Sodium Chloride, Diabetes Mellitus, Diagnosis and Investigation, HalfLytely and Bisacodyl, Hyper-Sal, Potassium Chloride/Sodium Chloride, Ayr Saline Nasal, Dextrose/Sodium Chloride, Saline Nasal Mist, Rhinaris, Thermotabs, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, NebuSal, Saljet Sterile, Altamist, Lymphoseek Diluent, NasoGel, Simply Saline

High Salt Intake May Double Heart Failure Risk

Posted 28 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 28, 2017 – A high-salt diet significantly increases the risk for heart failure. That's the conclusion of Finnish researchers who found that people who consume more than 13,700 milligrams of salt a day – about 2.5 teaspoons – had double the risk for heart failure than low-salt consumers. "High salt [sodium chloride] intake is one of the major causes of high blood pressure and an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke," said researcher Pekka Jousilahti. "The heart does not like salt," said Jousilahti, a research professor at the National Institute for Health and Welfare in Helsinki. "High salt intake markedly increases the risk of heart failure," he added in a news release from the European Society of Cardiology. In addition to coronary heart disease and stroke, heart failure is a major cardiovascular disease globally, but the role of high salt ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Sodium Chloride, Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Hyper-Sal, HalfLytely and Bisacodyl, Potassium Chloride/Sodium Chloride, Saline Nasal Mist, Dextrose/Sodium Chloride, Rhinaris, Ayr Saline Nasal, Thermotabs, Left Ventriculography, Thermoject, Saljet Rinse, Pediamist, Little Noses, NasoGel

FDA Medwatch Alert: 0.9 Percent Sodium Chloride Injection by ICU Medical: Recall - Presence of Particulate Matter

Posted 1 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

[Posted 07/31/2017] ISSUE: ICU Medical, Inc. is voluntarily recalling one lot of 0.9% Sodium Chloride Injection, USP 1000 mL to the hospital/user level due to a confirmed customer complaint of particulate matter identified as stainless steel within a single flexible container. Injection of particulate matter could potentially lead to limited adverse events such as allergic reactions, local irritation and inflammation in organs or tissues, or other serious adverse health consequences. BACKGROUND: 0.9% Sodium Chloride Injection, USP 1000 mL is an intravenous solution indicated for parenteral replenishment of fluid. The affected product lot was manufactured in the U.S. by Hospira, a Pfizer company, on February 1, 2016 and was distributed nationwide to Hospira customers between April 14, 2016 and February 2, 2017. The affected lot is: NDC 0409-7983-09, Lot # 61-841-FW Expires January 01, ... Read more

Related support groups: Sodium Chloride, Hyper-Sal, Saljet Rinse, Thermoject, Tip-Lok Diluent, Normal Saline Flush, Swabflush, Lymphoseek Diluent, Saljet Sterile, NebuSal, PulmoSal, Broncho Saline

Health Tip: Don't Pass the Salt, Please

Posted 10 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Like many people, you may be trying to cut back on the amount of salt in your diet. The problem is, lots of packaged foods are loaded with salt. The U.S. National, Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute says there are several steps you can take: In general, using fresh foods without adding salt is the way to go. If you do use canned or frozen vegetables or other "convenience" foods, make sure they are labeled "no salt added." Be sure to check the sodium content listed on different brands. Rinsing canned foods, like tuna, often reduces sodium content. Read more

Related support groups: Sodium Chloride, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, HalfLytely and Bisacodyl, Hyper-Sal, Ayr Saline Nasal, Potassium Chloride/Sodium Chloride, Rhinaris, Thermotabs, Saline Nasal Mist, Dextrose/Sodium Chloride, Normal Saline Flush, Simply Soothing, Nasal Saline, Ocean Complete, NasoGel, Dextrose/Sodium Chloride/Potassium Chloride, Swabflush, Humist, SaltAire

Americans Buying Less Salt-Laden Foods

Posted 5 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 5, 2017 – Americans' addiction to salt may be waning, as food manufacturers gradually cut amounts in their products and consumers opt for less salty fare, a new study suggests. A survey of more than 172,000 households found that between 2000 and 2014 the amount of salt in the packaged food and drinks people bought was reduced by nearly 400 milligrams (mg) a day, dropping from more than 2,300 mg to less than 2,000 mg a day. At the same time, the salt content of packaged foods consumers purchased decreased 12 percent, said lead researcher Jennifer Poti, a nutritional epidemiologist and research assistant professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. "Our findings suggest that U.S. households are getting less sodium from the grocery store than they did 15 years ago, yet sodium levels in packaged foods are still too high," she said. The researchers also found ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Sodium Chloride, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Hyper-Sal, HalfLytely and Bisacodyl, Potassium Chloride/Sodium Chloride, Saline Nasal Mist, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Dextrose/Sodium Chloride, Rhinaris, Ayr Saline Nasal, Thermotabs, Thermoject, Saljet Rinse, Pediamist, Little Noses, NasoGel

Just 5 Percent of Daily Salt Gets Added at the Table

Posted 9 May 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 8, 2017 – Tossing out the salt shaker may not be enough for your heart health. Most of the salt that Americans consume comes from processed foods and restaurant meals, a new study finds. In a sampling of 450 U.S. adults, only 10 percent of salt, or sodium, in their diet came from food prepared at home. About half of that was added at the table. Instead, restaurant meals and store-bought foods – including crackers, breads and soups – accounted for 71 percent of salt intake, the study found. "Care must be taken when food shopping and eating out to steer clear of higher-sodium foods," said lead researcher Lisa Harnack. For prevent harmful high blood pressure, Americans are advised to limit salt intake to 2,300 milligrams (mg) daily, said Harnack, a professor at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health. That's the equivalent of one teaspoon. But, more than eight ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Sodium Chloride, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Hyper-Sal, HalfLytely and Bisacodyl, Potassium Chloride/Sodium Chloride, Saline Nasal Mist, Dextrose/Sodium Chloride, Ayr Saline Nasal, Rhinaris, Thermotabs, Sea Soft, Nasal Moist, NasoGel, Normal Saline Flush, Simply Soothing, Nasal Saline, Ocean Complete

Is a Low-Salt Diet Always Healthy?

Posted 25 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 25, 2017 – Steering clear of salty foods might not be as helpful for your heart health as previously thought, a new study claims. Participants in a long-range heart study did not appear to derive any health advantage from a low-salt diet, said lead researcher Lynn Moore. "People who were on a lower-sodium [salt] diet in general over the next 20 or 30 years actually had no benefit, specifically in terms of their blood pressure or their risk of developing heart disease," said Moore, an associate professor with the Boston University School of Medicine. On the other hand, these people did enjoy better health when they increased their intake of potassium, a mineral that helps the heart in a couple of ways, Moore and her colleagues found. "Higher intakes of potassium were strongly associated with both a lower blood pressure and a lower risk of heart disease," Moore said. "The ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Sodium Chloride, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, HalfLytely and Bisacodyl, Hyper-Sal, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Dextrose/Sodium Chloride, Ayr Saline Nasal, Rhinaris, Potassium Chloride/Sodium Chloride, Saline Nasal Mist, Thermotabs, SaltAire, Saline Mist, Salinex, Broncho Saline

The Saltiest Foods May Surprise You

Posted 31 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 30, 2017 – You probably know that Americans consume way too much salt, but a new U.S. government report points the finger at some surprising sources of salt in the diet. The report said the top 5 culprits were: Bread. Pizza. Sandwiches. Cold cuts and cured meats. Soup. Surprisingly, potato chips, pretzels and other obviously salty snacks didn't make it into the top five, though they did ring in at number 7. "Most Americans are consuming too much salt and it's coming from a lot of commonly consumed foods – about 25 foods contribute the majority of salt," said lead researcher Zerleen Quader. She's an analyst from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Knowing which foods contribute the most salt is important for reducing your salt intake, she said. Sodium is an essential mineral that helps the body maintain fluid balance, according to the American Heart ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Sodium Chloride, HalfLytely and Bisacodyl, Hyper-Sal, Potassium Chloride/Sodium Chloride, Ayr Saline Nasal, Dextrose/Sodium Chloride, Rhinaris, Thermotabs, Saline Nasal Mist, Normal Saline Flush, Simply Soothing, Nasal Saline, Ocean Complete, NasoGel, Bisacodyl/Polyethylene Glycol 3350/Potassium Chloride/Sodium Bicarbonate/Sodium Chloride, Swabflush, Humist, SaltAire

Americans With High Blood Pressure Still Eating Too Much Salt

Posted 8 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 8, 2017 – For Americans with high blood pressure, cutting back on salt is an important way to help keep the condition under control. Yet, new research shows that these patients are getting more salt in their diet than they did in 1999. Between 1999 and 2012, salt (sodium) consumption rose from about 2,900 milligrams a day (mg/day) to 3,350 mg/day. That's more than double the ideal upper limit of 1,500 mg/day of sodium recommended by the American Heart Association for people with high blood pressure (or "hypertension"). One teaspoon of table salt contains about 2,300 mg of sodium. Salt also contains chloride, but it's the sodium that's concerning for heart and blood pressure problems. Sodium is an essential nutrient that helps control water balance in the body. But too much can cause excess water to build up, increasing blood pressure, and putting a strain on the heart ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Ischemic Stroke, Sodium Chloride, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Hyper-Sal, HalfLytely and Bisacodyl, Potassium Chloride/Sodium Chloride, Saline Nasal Mist, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Rhinaris, Dextrose/Sodium Chloride, Thermotabs, Ayr Saline Nasal, Hypertensive Congestive Heart Failure, Ocean, Ocean Kids, Afrin Saline

Cutting Salt a Health Boost for Kidney Patients

Posted 17 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 16, 2017 – Encouraging people with kidney disease to reduce their salt intake may help improve blood pressure and cut excess fluid retention, at least for a while, a new study suggests. Study participants lowered their systolic blood pressure (the top number) by almost 11 points, on average, on a salt-restricted diet versus their usual diet. They also flushed out a liter of water (about one-quart) from their bodies, on average, by slashing salt in their diets, researchers said. Having high blood pressure and retaining excess salt and water in the body stresses the heart and blood vessels, explained lead author Dr. Rajiv Saran of the University of Michigan. For kidney disease patients, high blood pressure (or "hypertension") and excess fluid in the body can be a toxic combination. "They die predominantly of cardiovascular disease," said Saran, a professor of internal ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Renal Failure, Chronic Kidney Disease, Sodium Chloride, Diabetic Kidney Disease, Peritoneal dialysis, Diabetic Nephropathy, Anemia Associated with Chronic Renal Failure, HalfLytely and Bisacodyl, Hyper-Sal, Renal Osteodystrophy, Ayr Saline Nasal, Dextrose/Sodium Chloride, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Saline Nasal Mist, Rhinaris, Thermotabs, Potassium Chloride/Sodium Chloride, Altamist

Government-Backed Salt Reduction Efforts Could Deliver Big Health Pay Day

Posted 11 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 10, 2017 – Government-supported policies to reduce people's salt consumption are highly cost-effective worldwide, a new study reports. "We know that excess dietary salt causes hundreds of thousands of cardiovascular deaths each year," said study senior author Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian. He's dean of Tufts University's Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy in Boston. "The trillion-dollar question has been how to start to bring salt down, and how much such an effort would cost," Mozaffarian said in a university news release. Study first author Michael Webb is a doctoral student in economics at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif. He said, "We found that a government-supported national plan to reduce salt would be cost-effective in nearly every country in the world. This was true even if we assumed the estimated costs were much greater or the benefits less ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Sodium Chloride, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Hyper-Sal, HalfLytely and Bisacodyl, Dextrose/Sodium Chloride, Saline Nasal Mist, Potassium Chloride/Sodium Chloride, Ayr Saline Nasal, Rhinaris, Thermotabs, Sea Soft, Nasal Moist, NasoGel, Normal Saline Flush, Simply Soothing, Nasal Saline, Ocean Complete, Rhino-Mist

Craving Salt? Your Genes May Be the Reason, Study Suggests

Posted 13 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Nov. 13, 2016 – Some people carry a genetically driven "salt tooth" that could affect how heavily they season their food, potentially endangering their heart, a new study suggests. Genetic variations cause some people to be more keenly aware of bitter flavors, said lead researcher Jennifer Smith, a doctoral student at the University of Kentucky College of Nursing. These people are about twice as likely to exceed the daily limit of salt recommended by heart health specialists, according to study findings presented Sunday at the American Heart Association annual meeting in New Orleans. The research centers on a gene called TAS2R38. Variations of this gene have been shown to enhance a person's perception of bitter flavors. "We were looking at a gene that codes for taste receptors," Smith said. "People with one genotype will taste bitter more keenly than people who have the other ... Read more

Related support groups: Sodium Chloride, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, HalfLytely and Bisacodyl, Hyper-Sal, Ayr Saline Nasal, Potassium Chloride/Sodium Chloride, Rhinaris, Thermotabs, Saline Nasal Mist, Dextrose/Sodium Chloride, Normal Saline Flush, Simply Soothing, Nasal Saline, Ocean Complete, NasoGel, Dextrose/Sodium Chloride/Potassium Chloride, Swabflush, Humist, SaltAire

Many Kids Still Eating Too Much Salt

Posted 3 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 3, 2016 – American children's high salt intake puts them at risk for heart disease later in life, a new study warns. Nearly 90 percent of U.S. kids consume more than the recommended amount of salt for their age, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention discovered. Sodium-heavy breads, pizza, cold cuts, processed snacks and soups are among the major culprits, according to the report. "We already know that nearly all Americans regardless of age, race and gender consume more sodium than is recommended for a healthy diet, and the excess intake is of great concern among particular youths," lead author Zerleen Quader said. Quader is a data analyst in the CDC's Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention. The researchers analyzed 2011-2012 data from more than 2,100 children, aged 6 to 18, nationwide. The kids' average salt intake was 3,256 ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Obesity, Hypertension, Sodium Chloride, Hyper-Sal, HalfLytely and Bisacodyl, Dextrose/Sodium Chloride, Saline Nasal Mist, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Potassium Chloride/Sodium Chloride, Ayr Saline Nasal, Rhinaris, Thermotabs, Sea Soft, Nasal Moist, NasoGel, Normal Saline Flush, Simply Soothing, Nasal Saline, Ocean Complete

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