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Streptococcal Infection News

Related terms: Scarlatina, Scarlet fever

Health Tip: Recognize Signs of Strep Throat

Posted 10 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Strep throat is a contagious infection caused by streptococcal bacteria. Your doctor will prescribe an antibiotic, which you must finish to make sure the infection is killed completely. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention mentions these symptoms of strep: A very sore throat that starts suddenly and hurts when you swallow. A sore throat accompanied by fever. Swollen, red tonsils, which may have steaks of pus, or white patches. Small red dots on the roof of the mouth. Swollen lymph nodes in the front of the neck. Read more

Related support groups: Sore Throat, Streptococcal Infection

Health Tip: Understanding Antibiotics

Posted 9 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

-- By taking an antibiotic as prescribed, you can get well faster and help prevent germs from becoming resistant to your medication. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers these antibiotic guidelines: Never skip a dose of antibiotic. Always take it on schedule, as directed. Never stop taking an antibiotic early. Always take the entire prescription, unless your doctor tells you otherwise. Never save any antibiotic medication for a future illness. Never take an antibiotic that was prescribed for another person. Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Amoxicillin, Metronidazole, Doxycycline, Bacterial Infection, Cephalexin, Clindamycin, Bactrim, Azithromycin, Cipro, Ciprofloxacin, Augmentin, Levaquin, Flagyl, Keflex, Zithromax, Valtrex, Trimethoprim, Sulfamethoxazole, Acyclovir

Guinea Pigs Can Be Source of Serious Strep Infection

Posted 16 Dec 2014 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 16, 2014 – In the world of infectious diseases, one worrisome phenomenon is when an illness that originated in animals jumps over into people. The process – known as zoonosis – is not uncommon and keeps researchers on their toes as they look for signs that an animal-borne disease might make inroads into the human population. A new report focuses on just such a development – and the culprits in this case were guinea pigs. More specifically, they were guinea pigs infected with a bacteria known as Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus. "Animal to human transmission of this bacteria is pretty rare," stressed study author Karen Gruszynski, a veterinary epidemiologist at the Virginia Department of Health in Richmond. "There is nothing in our findings to be really alarmed about," she said. "But what we are trying to do is highlight the fact that a disease that we ... Read more

Related support groups: Streptococcal Infection

Mistaken Infection 'On The Prairie'?

Posted 4 Feb 2013 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 4 – Fans of the pioneer tales known as "Little House on the Prairie" are familiar with the ravages of scarlet fever. That's because Mary Ingalls – sister of the autobiographical series' author, Laura Ingalls Wilder – went blind, supposedly because of complications from the illness. But medical experts today think it's time that explanation went the way of the wagon wheel. "Scarlet fever is unlikely because there isn't eye involvement with that disease," said Sarah Allexan, coauthor of a new article detailing Mary's illness. The results of Allexan's detective work were released online Feb. 4 in the journal Pediatrics. In a book from the Little House series called By the Shores of Silver Lake, Ingalls Wilder wrote: "Mary and Carrie and baby Grace and Ma had all had scarlet fever. Far worst of all, the fever had settled in Mary's eyes and Mary was blind." Scarlet fever, ... Read more

Related support groups: Meningitis, Measles, Streptococcal Infection

Health Tip: Why Antibiotic Resistance Is Serious

Posted 16 Nov 2011 by Drugs.com

-- Antibiotic resistance occurs when a bacterium mutates and becomes immune to the effects of a specific antibiotic. You can help prevent antibiotic resistance by taking an antibiotic regimen only when necessary. Remember that antibiotics don't work against viral infections such as a cold or the flu. If you do begin taking an antibiotic, you should never skip a dose. Also, you should finish the entire amount that your doctor has prescribed, despite the fact that you might be feeling better. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says antibiotic-resistant bacteria are dangerous because: It may be difficult to find a medication that kills the bacteria. Resistant bacteria tend to spread more quickly between families and within communities. Infections become more difficult and more expensive to treat. People may die from a resistant infection before it can be treated ... Read more

Related support groups: Amoxicillin, Metronidazole, Doxycycline, Bacterial Infection, Cephalexin, Clindamycin, Penicillin, Bactrim, Azithromycin, Cipro, Ciprofloxacin, Augmentin, Levaquin, Flagyl, Keflex, Zithromax, Trimethoprim, Sulfamethoxazole, Nitrofurantoin, Erythromycin

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Streptococcemia, Bacterial Infection

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