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Related terms: Cancer, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Skin Cancer, Squamous Cell, SCC

Heart Risks May Boost Women's Colon Cancer Risk, Too

Posted 1 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 1, 2017 – Even normal-weight women may be at greater risk for colon cancer if they have certain traits, such as elevated levels of blood fat, high blood sugar, high blood pressure and low levels of good cholesterol, a new study suggests. Among older women of normal weight, those with so-called metabolic risk factors had a 49 percent increased risk for cancers of the colon, rectum and sigmoid colon (the lower part of the intestine connecting the rectum and colon) compared with healthy counterparts. Current guidelines recommend colon cancer screening primarily based on a person's age. But identifying at-risk individuals by their metabolic type could help prevent these cancers and catch them at an earlier stage, saving more lives, the study authors concluded. The takeaway: "Know your own metabolic health, even if your weight is normal," said Juhua Luo, the study's senior ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Obesity, Cancer, Lisinopril, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Losartan, High Cholesterol, Heart Attack, Benicar, Diovan, Spironolactone, Ramipril, Cozaar, Micardis, Enalapril, Valsartan, Benazepril, Colorectal Cancer, Avapro

Men: Here Are Ways to Healthier, Younger-Looking Skin

Posted 19 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18, 2017 – Many men don't think about skin care but they should, a dermatologist says. The first step is to understand your skin type, according to Dr. Anthony Rossi. Sensitive skin may sting or burn after product use. Normal skin is clear and not sensitive. Dry skin is flaky, itchy or rough. Oily skin is shiny and greasy, and combination skin is dry in some places and oily in others, Rossi explained. "Understanding your skin type will help you learn how to take care of your skin and select skin care products that are right for you," Rossi said in an American Academy of Dermatology news release. Rossi is assistant professor of dermatology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Weill Cornell Medical College, both in New York City If you're prone to acne, choose cleansers and moisturizers that are "oil-free" or "noncomedogenic," which means they won't clog your ... Read more

Related support groups: Acne, Rosacea, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Facial Wrinkles, Fleet, Biafine, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Skin Care, Vaseline, Aquaphor, Aveeno, Ammonium Lactate, Lanolin, Hylatopic, Complex-15, Lubriderm, CeraVe, Concept

Many College Women Ignore Indoor Tanning's Risks

Posted 13 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 13, 2017 – Despite the known dangers, many white female college students continue to tan indoors, a new study finds. Indoor tanning can lead to premature skin aging and skin cancers, including potentially deadly melanoma. It's particularly risky for younger people and frequent users, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For this study, researchers at Indiana University surveyed 629 white female undergraduate and graduate students. Just about all of the young women knew that tanning can cause premature skin aging and skin cancer. Moreover, almost 80 percent did not believe that indoor tanning is safe or any safer than outdoor tanning. Still, about seven out of 10 said they like to get a tan even though they know tanning may harm their skin. Nearly 84 percent said tanning makes them feel more attractive. Those more likely to use tanning booths or ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Sunburn, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Sunscreen, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Prevention of Sunburn, History - Skin Cancer, Coppertone, Deeptan

U.S. Melanoma Rate Is Rising, Study Finds

Posted 22 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 21, 2016 – More Americans are developing the potentially deadly skin cancer known as melanoma than in the past, new research shows. In 2016, one out of every 54 Americans was expected to develop a potentially lethal, invasive melanoma over their lifetime – up from the one in 58 estimate when the same tally was performed in 2009. Overall, an estimated 76,380 Americans will be diagnosed with melanoma in 2016, said a team led by Dr. Alex Glazer of the National Society for Cutaneous Medicine in New York City. "The overall burden of disease for melanoma is increasing," Glazer's team reported in a study published online Dec. 21 in JAMA Dermatology. Skin cancers are by far the most common cancer for Americans. Most are easily treated and removed, but melanomas can be much more serious. According to the American Cancer Society, "melanoma accounts for only about 1 percent of ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Diagnosis and Investigation, History - Skin Cancer

A Little Training Helps Couples Ease Into Skin Cancer Checks

Posted 14 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 14, 2016 – Skin cancer checks between couples don't have to be a puzzle – or embarrassing, a new study shows. Over time, and with some training on spotting troublesome moles and potential skin cancer lesions, partners gained confidence and overcame their inhibitions about the checks, the researchers said. Embarrassment was especially an issue for women, said the team led by Dr. June Robinson, a professor of dermatology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. "These aren't parts of the body that most females like to have examined by their male partner, but at some point, they realized they're just looking at the moles, not the cellulite," Robinson said in a university news release. "We found that as long as the [health] benefit is strong enough, it overcomes whatever potential embarrassment there might be between the partners," she said. One ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Diagnosis and Investigation, History - Skin Cancer

Keeping Minors From Tanning Beds Would Save Thousands of Lives, Study Says

Posted 6 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 6, 2016 – Restricting people younger than 18 from indoor tanning could prevent thousands of skin cancers and deaths in the United States, according to a new study. An age limitation would also save the country hundreds of millions of dollars in skin cancer treatment costs, researchers found. "This research concretely demonstrates the potential health benefits of an under-18 age restriction for indoor tanning," said Dr. Abel Torres, president of the American Academy of Dermatology Association. People who engage in indoor tanning are exposed to ultraviolet radiation, a major risk factor for skin cancer. Using indoor tanning before age 35 increases the risk of melanoma – the deadliest type of skin cancer – with each use, the researchers said. Last year, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration proposed a ban on indoor tanning by people younger than 18. At least a dozen states ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Sunburn, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Prevention of Sunburn, History - Skin Cancer

Plastic Surgeons Urge Giving Up E-Cigs Before Procedure

Posted 2 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 2, 2016 – Plastic surgery patients should avoid smoking e-cigarettes for at least four weeks before their procedures, two plastic surgeons advise. Patients who smoke are believed to face a higher risk of skin flap failure, apparently because nicotine reduces blood flow, the surgeons said. "Based on our current best knowledge, it seems reasonable to advise plastic surgery candidates to cease e-cigarette use," said Dr. Peter Taub,, of Mount Sinai Medical Center and Dr. Alan Matarasso of Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Both are in New York City. "Refraining from [e-cigarette] use four weeks before surgery is a prudent course of action, despite the fact that it has yet to be determined if the effects are similar to traditional cigarettes," they added. The doctors noted that there are still plenty of unanswered questions about the safety of e-cigarettes, which produce ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Smoking, Skin Infection, Smoking Cessation, Nicotine, Nicorette, Nicoderm CQ, Nicotrol Inhaler, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Commit, Habitrol, Vascular Surgery, History - Skin Cancer, Nicotrol TD, Nicorelief, Nicorette DS, Nicotrol NS, ProStep

Could White Wine Boost Your Melanoma Risk?

Posted 1 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 1, 2016 – A new study raises the possibility that people who enjoy a glass of white wine every day may face a slightly elevated risk of melanoma. Total alcohol intake was associated with a 14 percent higher risk of melanoma per drink per day, researchers found. But, when they looked at the type of alcohol consumed, white wine emerged as the potential culprit. Each drink per day of white wine was associated with a 13 percent higher risk of melanoma, the researchers said. "Per drink" risk was based on 12.8 grams of alcohol – the median amount of alcohol in a beer, a glass of wine or a shot of spirits. Beer, red wine and liquor did not significantly affect melanoma risk, the study authors added. The study does not prove that white wine causes this deadly skin cancer. It merely shows an association, though one worth exploring, the researchers said. "We are just adding one ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Alcohol Dependence, Colorectal Cancer, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Alcoholism, Hangover, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Head and Neck Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prevention, History - Skin Cancer, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

8 of 10 Texas Salons Heed Ban on Indoor Tanning for Minors

Posted 25 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 25, 2016 – Most indoor tanning salons in Texas comply with a law banning customers younger than 18, a new study found. Females posing as 17-year-olds called 829 tanning businesses statewide. Workers at 81 percent of the salons told the caller they could not use indoor tanning if they were 17, even with a parent's permission. "This level of compliance with the under-18 ban enacted by the Texas Legislature in 2013 underscores the importance of this approach as a strategy for skin cancer prevention," study lead author Mary Tripp said. Tripp is an instructor in behavioral science at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Despite high compliance with the under-18 ban, 83 percent of salons said clients could tan every day, Tripp noted in a university news release. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommends no more than three sessions during the first week of ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Sunburn, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Prevention of Sunburn, History - Skin Cancer

Can Protein in Common Skin Bacteria Offer Disease Protection?

Posted 23 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 23, 2016 – Our most common skin bacteria may help shield us from some skin diseases, a new study suggests. Swedish researchers report that Propionibacterium acnes secretes a protein called RoxP that protects against bacteria that are believed to contribute to several skin disorders. Specifically, RoxP protects against skin cell damage called oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen bacteria. UV radiation from the sun is a common cause of oxidative stress on the skin. Oxidative stress is believed to contribute to several skin diseases, including eczema, psoriasis and skin cancer. The protective effect of RoxP is as strong as antioxidants such as vitamins C and E, according to the study published recently in the journal Scientific Reports. "This protein is important for the bacterium's very survival on our skin. The bacterium improves its living environment by secreting ... Read more

Related support groups: Acne, Psoriasis, Eczema, Dermatitis, Rosacea, Contact Dermatitis, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Atopic Dermatitis, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, History - Skin Cancer, Minor Skin Irritation, Minor Skin Conditions

Indoor Tanners Aren't Taking Precautions Against Skin Cancer

Posted 12 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 – Frequent indoor tanners don't protect themselves from the sun and are no more likely to be screened for skin cancer than those who don't tan indoors, a new study suggests. The researchers analyzed data from a 2015 federal government health survey. It included more than 10,200 white adults aged 18 to 60 with no history of skin cancer. Of those, 7 percent said they had tanned indoors within the past year; 3.6 percent had done so one to nine times, and 3.4 percent had done it 10 times or more, the findings showed. Frequent indoor tanning was associated with less use of sunscreen, sun-protective clothing and shade while outdoors, and with several sunburns in the past year. In addition, frequent indoor tanners aged 18 to 34 were more likely to rarely or never wear sun-protective clothing or to seek shade on a sunny day than those who had never used a tanning bed. ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, History - Skin Cancer

Organ Transplants Linked to Higher Skin Cancer Risk

Posted 21 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21, 2016 – People who have an organ transplant may be more likely to develop skin cancer, new research suggests. The finding applies to all transplant patients, even those who are nonwhite and dark-skinned, according to Dr. Christina Lee Chung, an associate professor of dermatology at Drexel University in Philadelphia, and colleagues. The researchers said the risk increases over time with ongoing exposure to medications that suppress the immune system to prevent organ rejection. Total-body skin exams should be a routine part of care after transplant surgery, the study authors advised. For the study, the researchers analyzed medical records of 413 organ transplant recipients, 63 percent of whom were not white. The investigators found 19 new skin cancers in 15 of the nonwhite patients. That group included six black patients, five Asians and four Hispanics. Among the ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Renal Transplant, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Organ Transplant - Rejection Prophylaxis, Organ Transplant, Kidney Transplant, Graft-versus-host disease, Rejection Prophylaxis, History - Skin Cancer

Injury Risk Spikes While Cancer Patients Seek Diagnosis: Study

Posted 1 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 1, 2016 – Cancer patients face an added risk of injuries while their condition is being diagnosed, a new study says. The findings show the need for more effort to prevent both accidental and other types of injuries while patients await a diagnosis, according to the researchers. Led by Qing Shen, a postgraduate student in the department of medical epidemiology and biostatistics at Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, researchers studied injury-related hospitalizations of cancer patients in Sweden between 1990 and 2010. The investigators focused on the 16 weeks before and after diagnosis. During that time, nearly 721,000 patients were hospitalized. These cases included 7,300 injuries from medical complications and drug treatments, and over 8,300 injuries from accidents or intentional self-harm, the study findings showed. The risk for medical-related injuries is "not ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Diagnosis and Investigation, History - Skin Cancer, Prevention of Fractures

Health Tip: If You Have a Lot of Moles

Posted 29 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Having lots of moles may mean you're worried about skin cancer. Checking your skin often for changes and certain warning signs can help alleviate those fears. The American Academy of Dermatology recommends: Regularly inspect your skin, evaluating all of your moles. Look for any changes or unusual looking moles. See your dermatologist if any of your moles bleed, itch or change. Don't lie in the sun or use a tanning bed. Use sunscreen whenever outdoors to help prevent sunburn. See a dermatologist if you have 100 or more moles, or a significant portion of your body is covered with darker patches. Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Sunburn, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Sunscreen, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Photoaging of the Skin, Prevention of Sunburn, Dermatoheliosis, History - Skin Cancer, Coppertone, Minor Skin Conditions, Deeptan

U.S. Panel Says Evidence 'Insufficient' to Recommend Skin Cancer Screenings

Posted 26 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 26, 2016 – There currently isn't enough scientific proof to recommend regular full-body exams for skin cancer as a means of preventing deaths from these cancers, a leading panel of U.S. preventive health experts has concluded. An updated evidence review found scant evidence on either the benefits or harms of a health care professional performing a skin exam as part of a patient's regular check-up, said Dr. David Grossman. He is vice-chairperson of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). "We don't know if taking the extra time to examine every inch of someone's skin actually does yield benefit or causes no harm," Grossman said. Despite this, people should regularly check their own bodies for signs of skin cancer, and report anything unusual to their doctor, he added. "Someone who's got a mole they're worried about because it's growing and changing colors, they're ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Diagnosis and Investigation, History - Skin Cancer

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