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Could Low Vitamin D Levels at Birth Mean Higher MS Risk?

Posted 2 days 20 hours ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 1, 2016 – Newborns with low levels of vitamin D may have higher odds of developing multiple sclerosis (MS) later in life, new research suggests. Vitamin D deficiency is common among the general population, including pregnant women. But the researchers said it's too soon to routinely recommend "sunshine vitamin" supplements for mothers-to-be. "The study does not prove that increasing vitamin D levels reduces the risk of MS. Further studies are needed to confirm our results," said study leader Dr. Nete Munk Nielsen, a researcher at the Statens Serum Institute in Copenhagen, Denmark. About 2.5 million people worldwide have MS. It's a chronic disease of the central nervous system characterized by damage to myelin, the fatty substance coating nerve fibers. MS symptoms vary, but can include walking difficulties, fatigue, numbness and vision problems. A growing body of evidence ... Read more

Related support groups: Multiple Sclerosis, Vitamin D Deficiency, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation and Deficiency, Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Chronic Spasticity, Caltrate 600 with D, Vitamin D Insufficiency, Spasticity, Citracal + D, Calcium/Vitamin D, Upper Limb Spasticity, Citracal Petites, Oysco 500 with D, Lower Limb Spasticity, Spinal Spasticity, Citracal Creamy Bites, Oyster Shell Calcium, Calcet, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy

MS Symptoms May Develop Earlier in Darker, Cooler Climes

Posted 4 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 3, 2016 – The farther from the Equator someone with multiple sclerosis lives, the earlier symptoms begin, a new study finds. MS is a progressive disease affecting the central nervous system. Although symptoms vary, they often include fatigue, dizziness, weakness, numbness or tingling, trouble walking and vision problems. The cause of MS is thought to be an interplay of genetic and environmental factors, including latitude and/or exposure to sunlight and vitamin D levels. But it wasn't known if latitude – the distance north or south of the Equator – affected the age when symptoms start. To examine the issue, Dr. Bruce Taylor, a professor at Menzies Institute for Medical Research at the University of Tasmania, and colleagues analyzed data from more than 22,000 MS patients in Australia and 20 countries in Europe, North and South America and Asia. According to the new ... Read more

Related support groups: Multiple Sclerosis, Chronic Spasticity, Spasticity, Upper Limb Spasticity, Lower Limb Spasticity, Spinal Spasticity

Long Spaceflight Seems to Weaken Spinal Muscles

Posted 25 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 – After months in space, the muscles supporting an astronaut's spine shrink, a new study finds. And, the muscles don't return to normal even after the astronaut is back on Earth for several weeks, researchers from the University of California, San Diego, discovered. But there were no changes in astronauts' spinal disc height, according to the study. The researchers assessed six NASA astronauts who spent four to seven months on the International Space Station. The researchers said the study offers new insight into increased rates of back pain and spinal disc disease among astronauts on long space missions. "These findings run counter to the current scientific thinking about the effects of microgravity on disc swelling," said study author Dr. Douglas Chang. He's an associate professor of orthopedic surgery and chief of physical medicine and rehabilitation service ... Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Spinal Cord Trauma, Spinal Spasticity

Powerful MS Drug Used Early May Reverse Some Disability

Posted 14 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 – A multiple sclerosis drug usually reserved for people in the late stages of the disease seems to offer long-term remission in newly diagnosed patients, researchers report. Because of serious side effects, the drug – Lemtrada (alemtuzumab) – is approved in the United States only for patients who have failed other treatments. But the authors of a new study believe giving it early may slow and even reverse some disease-related disability. "The expectation in MS has always been to try to slow down the progression of the disease. Now we can tell our patients that a significant number can actually improve by reversing their disability," said lead researcher Dr. Gavin Giovannoni. He is a neurology professor at Queen Mary University of London in England. The treatment is not without its downsides, however. Because of the potential for side effects, people who received ... Read more

Related support groups: Multiple Sclerosis, Chronic Spasticity, Spasticity, Upper Limb Spasticity, Lemtrada, Campath, Lower Limb Spasticity, Alemtuzumab, Spinal Spasticity

Drug Shows Promise Against MS in Mouse Study

Posted 22 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21, 2016 – An experimental drug, laquinimod, appears to prevent or slow the progression of multiple sclerosis (MS) in mice, according to a new study. "This study has given us more insight into how laquinimod works," said study author Dr. Scott Zamvil, of the University of California, San Francisco. "But because this was an animal study, more research needs to be done before we know if it could have similar results in people." Still, "these results are promising because they provide hope for people with progressive MS, an advanced version of the disease for which there is currently no treatment," Zamvil said in a news release from the American Academy of Neurology. A healthy immune system has T cells and B cells that help the body prevent infections. However, for people with MS, these cells create antibodies that attack and destroy the protective outer coating (myelin) ... Read more

Related support groups: Multiple Sclerosis, Chronic Spasticity, Diagnosis and Investigation, Spasticity, Upper Limb Spasticity, Spinal Spasticity, Lower Limb Spasticity

Treating Early Symptoms of MS May Extend Time to Diagnosis

Posted 11 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 11, 2016 – Starting multiple sclerosis (MS) treatment when the first signs of the disabling disease appear may delay the period before the condition is definitively diagnosed or a relapse occurs, new long-term research indicates. Researchers found that people who received early treatment for symptoms consistent with the onset of MS were one-third less likely to eventually be diagnosed with MS than participants whose treatment was delayed. Those symptoms include numbness, or vision or balance problems. Patients in the early treatment group also experienced a 19 percent lower annual relapse rate, the study found. "The surprise is that after 11 years, we were still able to detect a difference favoring early treatment, although the delay in starting treatment in the delayed treatment group was only 1.5 years on average," said study author Dr. Ludwig Kappos. He's a professor ... Read more

Related support groups: Multiple Sclerosis, Chronic Spasticity, Betaseron, Spasticity, Upper Limb Spasticity, Spinal Spasticity, Lower Limb Spasticity

Ipsen Biopharmaceuticals, Inc. Announces FDA Approval of Dysport (abobotulinumtoxinA) for the Treatment of Lower Limb Spasticity in Pediatric Patients Aged Two and Older

Posted 2 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

BASKING RIDGE, N.J., Aug. 1, 2016 /PRNewswire/ – Ipsen Biopharmaceuticals, Inc., a subsidiary of Ipsen SA (Euronext: IPN; ADR: IPSEY) (Ipsen), today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved its supplemental Biologics License Application (sBLA) for Dysport® (abobotulinumtoxinA) for injection for the treatment of lower limb spasticity in pediatric patients two years of age and older. Dysport® is the first and only FDA-approved botulinum toxin for the treatment of pediatric lower limb spasticity. Those treated with Dysport® showed statistically significant improvement in co-primary efficacy assessments: mean change from baseline in Modified Ashworth scale (MAS) in ankle plantar flexor muscle tone and mean Physician's Global Assessment (PGA) response to treatment score at Week 4 and Week 12. A majority of patients in the clinical study were eligible for re ... Read more

Related support groups: Cerebral Palsy, Spasticity, Dysport, Lower Limb Spasticity, Spinal Spasticity, Abobotulinumtoxina

MS Stem Cell Therapy Succeeds But Poses Risks

Posted 10 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 9, 2016 – A treatment combining chemotherapy and a stem cell transplant could represent a major advance against aggressive multiple sclerosis, experts say. This new treatment destroys the immune system with chemo and rebuilds it with the patient's own stem cells. Researchers say it stopped MS relapses and progression in 23 of 24 patients. According to the results of this small trial, these 23 patients no longer needed medication to control their MS. Moreover, eight showed continued improvement for nearly eight years. "These patients had highly active MS with lots of relapses and lots of ongoing damage to their brain, but we've been able to stop that," said lead researcher Dr. Harold Atkins. He is an associate professor of clinical hematology at the University of Ottawa in Canada. The results are noteworthy, Atkins said. "There are lots of drugs and treatments available ... Read more

Related support groups: Multiple Sclerosis, Chronic Spasticity, Diagnosis and Investigation, Spasticity, Upper Limb Spasticity, Spinal Spasticity, Lower Limb Spasticity

Botox Can Be Used for Chronic Migraine, Experts Say

Posted 18 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 18, 2016 – Botox is a safe and effective treatment for chronic migraine and three other neurological disorders, an updated guideline from the American Academy of Neurology says. Long used to smooth wrinkles, botulinum toxin is made by a type of bacteria. The toxin blocks the release of substances at nerve endings, reducing muscle contraction and the transmission of pain signals, the researchers explained. The authors of the updated guideline reviewed scientific studies on the four preparations of botulinum toxin available in the United States. They concluded that the treatment is generally safe and effective for four neurological conditions: chronic migraine, spasticity in adults, cervical dystonia and blepharospasm. Chronic migraine is defined as having migraines 15 or more days a month, the study authors explained. Spasticity in adults is muscle tightness that ... Read more

Related support groups: Migraine, Migraine Prevention, Migraine Prophylaxis, Facial Wrinkles, Cervical Dystonia, Chronic Spasticity, Blepharospasm, Spasticity, Upper Limb Spasticity, Lower Limb Spasticity, Myobloc, Spinal Spasticity, Botulinum Toxin Type B

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