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Health Tip: Get the Facts About Antibiotics

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Antibiotics aren't always what you or your child needs to get well. The American Academy of Pediatrics explains: An antibiotic will not help the common cold, which is caused by a virus. Antibiotics only treat bacterial infections, not those caused by viruses or other germs. Overuse of an antibiotic could lead to bacteria that becomes resistant to that medication. That's why an antibiotic should never be used unless necessary. An antibiotic could cause mild side effects, such as diarrhea. Green or yellow mucus can signal a viral infection or a bacterial infection. Symptoms lasting longer than 10 days accompanied by fever may mean a bacterial infection. Not all ear infections need an antibiotic. Many will go away without treatment. Ask your doctor about this. Most sore throats are caused by a virus, but strep throat does need an antibiotic. An antibiotic usually starts working within ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Diarrhea, Bacterial Infection, Otitis Media, Sore Throat, Viral Infection, Diarrhea, Acute

How to Exercise Safely in Smog

Posted 11 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 11, 2016 – Scientists say they have figured out the ideal speeds for cyclists and pedestrians to move in order to limit their inhalation of air pollution and still get the full benefits of exercise. "The faster you move, the harder you breathe and the more pollution you could potentially inhale, but you also are exposed to traffic for a shorter period of time. This analysis shows where the sweet spot is," study author Alex Bigazzi, a transportation expert at the University of British Columbia, said in a school news release. The researchers used a computer model of 10,000 people. The investigators found that cyclists should ride between 7.5 to 12.4 miles per hour on city roads. And, pedestrians should walk between 1.2 and 3.7 miles per hour. There are different recommended speeds depending on gender, age and road grades. For example, on flat roads the ideal speeds are: 7.8 ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Cough, Asthma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Weight Loss, Bronchitis, Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Dyspnea, Sore Throat, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Bronchiectasis, Bronchospasm Prophylaxis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup, Bronchospastic Disease, Reversible Airways Disease

Health Tip: Recognize Signs of Strep Throat

Posted 10 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Strep throat is a contagious infection caused by streptococcal bacteria. Your doctor will prescribe an antibiotic, which you must finish to make sure the infection is killed completely. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention mentions these symptoms of strep: A very sore throat that starts suddenly and hurts when you swallow. A sore throat accompanied by fever. Swollen, red tonsils, which may have steaks of pus, or white patches. Small red dots on the roof of the mouth. Swollen lymph nodes in the front of the neck. Read more

Related support groups: Sore Throat, Streptococcal Infection

Do Your Part to Stop Spreading Colds and Flu

Posted 8 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 7, 2016 – It's easy to spread germs that cause colds, flu and other serious illnesses, including whooping cough and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). That's why you need to protect yourself and take steps to avoid infecting others, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Here's what the agency recommends you can do: Don't have close contact with people who are sick. If you are sick, stay home. When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue. Wash your hands often. Use soap and warm water and wash for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water aren't available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer. Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Clean and disinfect often-used surfaces at home, work or school – especially when someone is sick. Get plenty of sleep. Get regular physical activity. Take steps to ease stress. Drink plenty ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Influenza, Cold Symptoms, Sore Throat, Cough and Nasal Congestion

Are You and Your Home Ready for Winter?

Posted 18 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 – Winter storms can pack a wallop. But, people who prepare before temperatures plummet are more likely to stay safe and healthy during winter months, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Before winter sets in, the CDC recommends taking these steps at your home: Install weatherstripping, insulation and storm windows. Insulate water pipes along exterior walls. Clear out gutters and fix roof leaks. Have your heating system serviced to make sure it's clean and working properly. Inspect and clean fireplaces and chimneys. Install smoke detectors and check batteries each month. Have a safe alternative heating source and alternate fuels available. (Generators should be at least 20 feet from the house.) Stock up on water and nonperishable foods that don't need to be cooked. Keep cellphones fully charged. Don't store grills, camp stoves and ... Read more

Related support groups: Cold Symptoms, Sore Throat

Health Tip: Need Pain Relief?

Posted 13 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Over-the-counter pain relievers are an easy way to manage common aches and pains. The American Academy of Family Physicians says OTC pain relievers can help with: Stiff, sprained or sore muscles. Headaches or menstrual cramps. Swelling (if an anti-inflammatory medication). Arthritis pain, back pain or pain after surgery. Ear pain or sinusitis. Flu, the common cold or a sore throat. Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Osteoarthritis, Muscle Pain, Cold Symptoms, Sore Throat

Truth or Fib? When Kids Say They're Too Sick for School

Posted 22 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 22, 2016 – It's only a matter of time after school begins before parents have to deal with a child who doesn't feel well enough to go. If your child complains of a headache, he or she probably isn't faking, said Dr. Jennifer Caudle. She is an assistant professor of family medicine at Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Stratford, N.J. Stress, lack of sleep or changes in diet can all contribute to headaches in children at the start of a new school year, she said in a university news release. Most headaches can be treated with over-the-counter (OTC) medications. Parents should seek medical attention if their child has a headache related to injury. Medical attention is also needed if a child complaining of headache has a fever and stiff neck, or if vision is affected, the headache doesn't go away or if it causes the child to miss school or other activities, she ... Read more

Related support groups: Headache, Influenza, Cold Symptoms, Sore Throat, Conjunctivitis

Why Being Cold Might Foster a Cold

Posted 12 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 11, 2016 – Scientists may be proving Mom right: Your odds of avoiding a cold get better if you bundle up and stay warm. Warmer body temperatures appear to help prevent the cold virus from spreading, in multiple ways, researchers at Yale University found. For the study, a team led by immunology professor Akiko Iwasaki examined human airways cells. These cells produce essential immune system proteins called interferons that respond to a cold virus. The cells were infected with the virus in a lab and incubated at either a core body temperature of 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit or a cooler temperature of 91.4 degrees Fahrenheit. Using mathematical models, the researchers found that when infected cells were exposed to healthy core body temperatures, the virus died off more quickly and wasn't able to replicate as well. Warmer body temperatures also seemed to help on another front. ... Read more

Related support groups: Influenza, Cold Symptoms, Sore Throat

Clean Pools Can Still Pose Health Hazards

Posted 2 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 2, 2016 – Nothing seems better on a hot day than hopping into a cool swimming pool. But, new research might prompt you to shower first and make sure your kids don't pee in the water. Researchers from the University of South Carolina report that the disinfectants used to keep pools clean can create dangerous disinfection byproducts (DBPs) when combined with sweat, personal care products and urine. Some of these byproducts have caused genetic damage to cells in laboratory tests, while other reports have found higher rates of bladder cancer and respiratory issues in people who are around pools regularly, the researchers said. And though the study findings held true for public pools, private pools and hot tubs, the researchers flagged indoor pools and hot tubs as a top concern, too. "I never had my kids on a swim team in an indoor pool, swimming every day. I would make that ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Asthma, Sinusitis, Cold Symptoms, Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Sore Throat, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Rhinitis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup, Vasomotor Rhinitis

Could Infant Colds, Other Infections Raise Type 1 Diabetes Risk?

Posted 3 May 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 3, 2016 – Colds and other infections in the first six months of life may boost the odds of a child developing type 1 diabetes by nearly 20 percent, new research suggests. The suspicion that infections play a role in the development of type 1 diabetes isn't new. Experts have long suspected that viral infections may trigger the disease. "This study really just bolsters the idea of early life events being crucial for the development of the immune system," said Jessica Dunne, director of discovery research for JDRF (formerly the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation). JDRF provided some of the funding for the new study. "But the jury is still out," she added. And the study authors themselves noted that their study can't prove a cause-and-effect relationship. It also isn't clear exactly how such infections might play a role in type 1 diabetes. "Various mechanisms have been ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Influenza, Insulin, Diabetes, Type 1, Cold Symptoms, Sore Throat

Too Many People Still Take Unneeded Antibiotics: Study

Posted 3 May 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 3, 2016 – Nearly one-third of the antibiotics prescribed in the United States aren't appropriate for the conditions being treated, a new federal government study shows. "We were able to conclude that at least 30 percent of the antibiotics that are given in doctors' offices, emergency departments and hospital-based clinics are unnecessary, meaning that no antibiotics were needed at all," said lead researcher Dr. Katherine Fleming-Dutra. Such misuse has helped fuel the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, which infect 2 million Americans and kill 23,000 every year, said Fleming-Dutra, a pediatrician and epidemiologist at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Antibiotics are most misused in the treatment of short-term respiratory conditions, such as colds, bronchitis, sore throats, and sinus and ear infections, the researchers reported. "About half of ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Amoxicillin, Doxycycline, Bacterial Infection, Cephalexin, Sinusitis, Azithromycin, Bactrim, Cipro, Ciprofloxacin, Augmentin, Levaquin, Tonsillitis/Pharyngitis, Keflex, Zithromax, Sulfamethoxazole, Erythromycin, Cold Symptoms, Minocycline, Clarithromycin

Mom Was Right: A Good Night's Sleep Helps Keep You Healthy

Posted 11 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 11, 2016 – In news that's sure to have mothers everywhere saying, "I told you so," scientists have confirmed that a good night's sleep may keep colds and other infections at bay. The odds that someone who sleeps five or fewer hours a night had caught a cold in the past month were 28 percent higher than for folks who regularly get more shuteye, the study found. And for other infections – including flu, ear infections and pneumonia – short sleepers had more than 80 percent higher odds of having an infection in the past month compared to those sleeping seven or eight hours, the study said. "People who sleep five or fewer hours on average are at substantially increased risk for both colds whether head or chest or other infections, compared to people who sleep seven to eight hours on average," said study researcher Aric Prather. He's an assistant professor of psychology at ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Influenza, Cold Symptoms, Sleep Apnea, Sore Throat, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Non-24-Hour Sleep Wake Disorder

Health Tip: Easing Sore Throat Pain

Posted 25 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

-- A sore throat may be among the most uncomfortable and annoying symptoms of a cold, allergy or flu. If you're fighting throat pain as you read this, the American Academy of Family Physicians advises: Using over-the-counter naproxen or acetaminophen. Never give aspirin to children. Using a mixture of 1 teaspoon of salt to one cup of warm water to make a soothing gargle solution. Sucking on a cold treat (such as a Popsicle), hard candy or throat lozenge. Drinking plenty of fluids. Running a humidifier. Read more

Related support groups: Influenza, Cold Symptoms, Sore Throat

Prenatal Acetaminophen Use Tied to Higher Asthma Risk in Kids: Study

Posted 10 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 10, 2016 – Pregnant women who take the painkiller acetaminophen – best known under the brand name Tylenol – may be more likely to have a child with asthma, new research suggests. Although the study wasn't designed to prove cause-and-effect, researchers found that prenatal exposure to the over-the-counter medicine was associated with an increased risk for asthma in children. However, the study authors and a U.S. expert agreed that the effect seen in the study doesn't yet warrant any change in guidelines regarding pain relief during pregnancy. In the study, Norwegian researchers tracked data from a large database – the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. The investigators focused on conditions during pregnancy for which some expectant mothers took acetaminophen, and compared that data against rates of asthma among 114,500 children as they reached the ages of 3 and ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Percocet, Emergency Contraception, Vicodin, Norco, Lortab, Asthma, Tylenol, Influenza, Acetaminophen, Asthma - Maintenance, Postcoital Contraception, Cold Symptoms, Paracetamol, Female Infertility, Fioricet, Excedrin, Endocet, Darvocet-N 100

Study Ties School Calendar to Asthma Flare-Ups

Posted 8 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 8, 2016 – Greater exposure to cold viruses may help explain why children with asthma tend to suffer their worst symptoms when their school reopens after a break, a new study suggests. "The school calendar predicts common cold transmission, and the common cold predicts asthma exacerbations," said senior author Lauren Meyers, a professor of integrative biology and statistics and data sciences at the University of Texas at Austin. "And this study provides a quantitative relationship between those things." It's been noted that children's asthma symptoms tend to spike when school starts in the fall and after long holidays such as spring break. Some experts have suggested that environmental factors, such as air quality in schools, might be to blame, but this new study suggests otherwise. Researchers analyzed 66,000 asthma-related hospitalizations of children in cities across ... Read more

Related support groups: Asthma, Influenza, Asthma - Maintenance, Cold Symptoms, Asthma - Acute, Sore Throat, Allergic Asthma, Reversible Airways Disease - Maintenance, Influenza with Pneumonia, Reversible Airways Disease

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