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Acetaminophen Won't Help Arthritis Pain, Study Finds

Posted 18 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 17, 2016 – Acetaminophen – commonly known as Tylenol in the United States – isn't an effective choice for relieving osteoarthritis pain in the hip or knee, or for improving joint function, a new study finds. Although the drug rated slightly better than placebo in studies, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) or diclofenac are better choices for short-term pain relief, the researchers said. "Regardless of dose, the prescription drug diclofenac is the most effective drug among painkillers in terms of improving pain and function in osteoarthritis," said lead researcher Dr. Sven Trelle. He's co-director of clinical trials at the University of Bern in Switzerland. However, even diclofenac comes with side effects. "If you are thinking of using a painkiller for osteoarthritis, you should consider diclofenac," Trelle said, but also ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Percocet, Vicodin, Osteoarthritis, Norco, Lortab, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Acetaminophen, Advil, Diclofenac, Voltaren, Aleve, Mobic, Voltaren Gel, Paracetamol, Fioricet, Motrin

Retail Prices of Dermatology Drugs Skyrocket

Posted 25 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25, 2015 – Patients using prescription creams, gels, sprays and pills for skin conditions may shell out substantially more at the pharmacy than they did just six years ago, a new study suggests. Between 2009 and 2015, retail prices of brand-name dermatologic drugs rose 401 percent, on average, study authors reported Nov. 25 in JAMA Dermatology. Even generics have succumbed to price inflation, up 279 percent between 2011 and 2014, based on the drugs surveyed. Price increases for skin treatments far outpaced the general inflation rate of 11 percent during the six-year study period, the researchers said. "Cancer drugs were the worst in terms of the numbers" – up 1,240 percent or nearly $11,000 over the six-year study period – primarily because of two medicines, said Dr. Steven Rosenberg, voluntary professor of dermatology at the University of Miami Miller School of ... Read more

Related support groups: Monistat, RID, Monistat 3, Eczema, Voltaren Gel, Monistat 7, Dermatitis, Therapeutic, Clobetasol, Contact Dermatitis, Bactroban, Mupirocin, Maintain, Hypercare, Drysol, Sulfur, Fluocinonide, Retin-A, Efudex, Epiduo

Experts Urge Caution With Popular Painkillers After FDA Warning

Posted 10 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 10, 2015 – People who regularly reach for widely used painkillers like ibuprofen and naproxen may need to think carefully before they pop those pills, heart experts say. Mounting evidence has shown that chronic use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can raise a person's risk of heart attack and stroke. The evidence is strong enough that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday ordered drug makers to toughen warning labels on both prescription and over-the-counter NSAIDs. The tougher warning does not include aspirin, an NSAID that has been shown to lower heart risks in some patients. Most people who occasionally take ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) or naproxen (Aleve) for infrequent headaches or pain don't have to worry, as long as they follow the dosage directions on the bottle, said Dr. Richard Chazal, president-elect of the American College of ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Celebrex, Advil, Diclofenac, Voltaren, Aleve, Mobic, Voltaren Gel, Motrin, Indomethacin, Toradol, Etodolac, Vicoprofen, Nabumetone, Flector, Flector Patch, Arthrotec

FDA Strengthens Heart Attack, Stroke Warning for Popular Painkillers

Posted 10 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 9, 2015 – The U.S Food and Drug Administration on Thursday strengthened the warning labels for widely used painkillers like ibuprofen and naproxen, saying they can increase the risk of heart attack or stroke. The FDA is asking people to think carefully about their use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), particularly if they've already had a heart attack, according to a consumer update on the agency's website. The agency said it is taking this action based on recent data that shows the risk of heart attack or stroke can increase even after using NSAIDs for a short time. "They used to say they might cause risk of heart attack or stroke. Now we are saying they do cause increased risk of heart attack and stroke," FDA spokesman Eric Pahon told NBC News. In particular, people should avoid taking multiple products that contain NSAIDs, according to the revised FDA ... Read more

Related support groups: Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Celebrex, Advil, Diclofenac, Voltaren, Aleve, Mobic, Voltaren Gel, Motrin, Indomethacin, Toradol, Etodolac, Vicoprofen, Nabumetone, Flector, Flector Patch, Arthrotec, Ketorolac

FDA Medwatch Alert: Non-aspirin Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs): Drug Safety Communication - FDA Strengthens Warning of Increased Chance of Heart Attack or Stroke

Posted 10 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

[Posted 07/09/2015] ISSUE:  FDA is strengthening an existing label warning that non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) increase the chance of a heart attack or stroke. Based on FDAs comprehensive review of new safety information, FDA is requiring updates to the drug labels of all prescription NSAIDs. As is the case with current prescription NSAID labels, the Drug Facts labels of over-the-counter (OTC) non-aspirin NSAIDs already contain information on heart attack and stroke risk. FDA will also request updates to the OTC non-aspirin NSAID Drug Facts labels. See the FDA Drug Safety Communication (Table 1) for a list of non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug products. Prescription NSAID labels will be revised to reflect the following information: The risk of heart attack or stroke can occur as early as the first weeks of using an NSAID. The risk may increase ... Read more

Related support groups: Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Celebrex, Advil, Diclofenac, Voltaren, Aleve, Mobic, Voltaren Gel, Motrin, Indomethacin, Toradol, Etodolac, Vicoprofen, Nabumetone, Flector, Flector Patch, Arthrotec, Ketorolac

When to Ice, When to Heat

Posted 11 May 2015 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, May 10, 2015 – Athletes aren't always sure whether to use heat or ice on injuries and aches and pains, so here is some advice from experts. If you suffer a sudden sports injury, you should follow a recovery program known as RICE: rest, ice, compression, elevation. "Elevation is probably the most important thing because it limits the amount of blood flow to the area and the amount of swelling," Dr. Scott Lynch, director of sports medicine at Penn State Hershey Medical Center, said in a center news release. Applying cold is important because it helps narrow blood vessels, preventing blood from accumulating at the injury site and causing too much inflammation and swelling that can delay healing. Icing an injury for the first 48 to 72 hours reduces the amount of secondary tissue damage and can also ease pain, said Dr. Cayce Onks, a family and sports medicine doctor at the medical ... Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Advil, Diclofenac, Voltaren, Aleve, Mobic, Voltaren Gel, Motrin, Indomethacin, Tendonitis, Toradol, Fracture, bone, Etodolac, Nabumetone, Flector, Frozen Shoulder, Flector Patch

After Heart Attack, Certain Painkillers May Raise Risk for Recurrence

Posted 9 May 2011 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 9 – People with a history of heart attack are at increased risk of suffering another attack or dying after even a week of taking certain types of prescription and over-the-counter painkillers, including Advil, Motrin or Voltaren, a large new study suggests. Danish researchers analyzed nationwide records of almost 84,000 heart attack survivors and found that those who used certain non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) for one week faced a 45 percent heightened risk of another heart attack. Three months' use raised the risk to 55 percent. The results reinforce a 2007 American Heart Association statement advising doctors about the risk of NSAID use among heart patients and recommending the drugs be used only in the lowest dose and for the shortest duration necessary. "The present results indicate there is no apparent safe therapeutic window for NSAIDs in patients with ... Read more

Related support groups: Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Heart Attack, Diclofenac, Advil, Voltaren, Aleve, Voltaren Gel, Motrin, Myocardial Infarction, Vicoprofen, Flector, Flector Patch, Arthrotec, Naprosyn, Advil PM, Treximet, Vimovo, Advil Cold and Sinus, Pennsaid

Pain Patches Making Gains in U.S.

Posted 22 Jan 2011 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 21 – Americans suffering from muscle pain are used to taking a pill or rubbing in a cream to help soothe their aches. But a new form of pain relief seems to be catching on: analgesics delivered through a medicated patch placed directly where it hurts. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the country's first over-the-counter, pain-relieving transdermal patches in 2008. But the patches, marketed under the brand name Salonpas, are nothing new. They've been sold in various countries in Asia since the 1930s, according to their manufacturer, the Japanese firm Hisamitsu Pharmaceutical. "Salonpas is the Western world catching up with Asia," said Dr. Rick Rosenquist, a professor of anesthesia and director of pain medicine at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine and chairman of the American Society of Anesthesiologists' committee on pain medicine. "If you are ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Muscle Pain, Voltaren Gel, Lidoderm, Flector Patch, Capsaicin, Pennsaid, Xylocaine Jelly, Capzasin, Zostrix, Solaraze, Bactine, Capzasin-HP, Icy Hot PM, L-M-X4, Capzasin-P, Drs Cream, Voltaren Topical, Lidocream, Xylocaine Viscous

Certain Painkillers Appear to Boost Odds for Heart Attack

Posted 11 Jan 2011 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 11 – Common painkillers taken to treat inflammation, such as Celebrex and Advil, can raise the risk of heart attack, stroke or death, a review of existing research suggests. Swiss researchers analyzed the results of 31 trials involving seven non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), as these medications are called, and concluded that cardiovascular risk needs to be considered before prescribing any of them. "NSAIDs are widely used worldwide for treating pain and inflammation," said Dr. Gregg Fonarow, American Heart Association spokesman and professor of cardiology at the University of California, Los Angeles. "A number of studies have shown that many of these agents are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events, particularly when used at higher doses and for longer periods of time, but uncertainty remains as to the magnitude of the risk and how the ... Read more

Related support groups: Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Celebrex, Diclofenac, Advil, Voltaren, Aleve, Voltaren Gel, Motrin, Vicoprofen, Flector, Flector Patch, Arthrotec, Naprosyn, Advil PM, Vimovo, Treximet, Advil Cold and Sinus, Vioxx, Pennsaid

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