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Related terms: Erythema, Rash

Health Tip: Leave Bed Bugs Behind

Posted 3 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Pesky bedbugs can find their way into your luggage and clothing and hitch a ride home with you. To prevent bed bug infestation, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recommends: Checking your lodgings for bedbugs. Use a flashlight to inspect the mattress, headboard and luggage racks. Storing your suitcase on a luggage rack, rather than on the floor. Make sure the rack is far from the bed. Checking your luggage as soon as you get home. Unpack your clothing directly into the washing machine, then dry on the hot cycle. Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Insect Bites

Got an Itch? Use These Tips for Relief -- and Don't Scratch

Posted 31 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 31, 2017 – Itchy skin is a common problem, but there are several ways to find relief, a dermatologist says. "There are many reasons for itchy skin," Dr. Hassan Galadari said in an American Academy of Dermatology news release. "It could be the result of a skin condition, such as eczema, shingles, hives or psoriasis, or it could be a sign of a contagious disease, like scabies or ringworm." To relieve itchy skin, Galadari offers these tips: Apply a cold, wet cloth or ice pack to the itchy area for five to 10 minutes or until the itch subsides. Or take an oatmeal bath. Use skin moisturizers that contain no additives, fragrances or perfumes. Apply topical anesthetics that contain pramoxine. Apply cooling agents such as menthol or calamine, or refrigerate your moisturizer to help achieve this cooling effect. Avoid scratching. It will irritate your skin and could lead to ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Herpes Zoster, Psoriasis, Eczema, Scabies, Plaque Psoriasis, Calamine, Varicella-Zoster, Pramoxine, Menthol, Anusol, Calmoseptine, Biofreeze, Terocin, Caladryl, Hydrocortisone/Pramoxine, Caladryl Clear, Dendracin, Analpram-HC, Sarna

How to Exfoliate Safely and Give Your Skin a Healthy Glow

Posted 8 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Jan. 8, 2017 – Many skin care products promise to improve appearance by exfoliating – or removing dead cells – from the skin's outer layer. But sometimes, exfoliating can do more harm than good, according to the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD). "For some people, exfoliation can actually make their skin worse with increased redness or acne breakouts," said Dr. Rebecca Tung, associate professor of dermatology at Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood, Ill. "If you choose to exfoliate, it's important to do so safely so that it does not damage your skin." Before exfoliating, consider your skin type, Tung advised in an AAD news release. Sensitive skin often burns or stings after use of skin care products. Normal skin is clear and not sensitive. Dry skin is flaky, itchy or rough. Oily skin is shiny and greasy. Combination skin is dry in some areas and oily in others. ... Read more

Related support groups: Acne, Skin Rash, Dry Skin, Rosacea, Hydroquinone, Facial Wrinkles, Fleet, Biafine, Tri-Luma, Skin Care, Vaseline, Aquaphor, Lanolin, Ammonium Lactate, Aveeno, Hylatopic, Complex-15, Eldoquin, Concept, Replens

Mouse Study Suggests Way to Stop Poison Ivy's Itch

Posted 8 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 7, 2016 – A new method of stopping the itch caused by poison ivy worked well in mice, researchers report. "Poison ivy rash is the most common allergic reaction in the U.S., and studies have shown that higher levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere are creating a proliferation of poison ivy throughout the U.S. – even in places where it wasn't growing before," said study senior author Sven-Eric Jordt. He's an associate professor of anesthesiology at Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, N.C. "When you consider doctor visits, the costs of the drugs that are prescribed and the lost time at work or at school, the societal costs are quite large," Jordt added in a Duke news release. The itch of poison ivy is caused by an oily sap called urushiol, which is also found in poison sumac and poison oak. In mice with poison ivy rashes, blocking an immune system protein in ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Diagnosis and Investigation

Skin Condition Often Misdiagnosed as Bacterial Problem

Posted 4 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 4, 2016 – Misdiagnosis of the bacterial skin condition cellulitis often leads to unnecessary antibiotic use and hospitalizations, a new study says. About one-third of people diagnosed with cellulitis don't actually have it, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston found. The researchers looked at a 30-month period, examining the medical records of 259 people hospitalized for lower extremity cellulitis in the hospital's emergency department. But, 79 of the patients didn't have cellulitis. Almost 85 percent didn't need hospitalization and 92 percent didn't need the antibiotics they received, the researchers said. Looking at how their findings might reflect the nation as a whole, the researchers estimated that the misdiagnosed skin condition leads to about 130,000 unnecessary hospitalizations. The problem may cause up to $515 million in unneeded medical ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Skin Rash, Skin Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Skin and Structure Infection, Secondary Cutaneous Bacterial Infections, Minor Skin Conditions

Gene Therapy May Hold Promise for Blistering Skin Disease

Posted 1 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 1, 2016 – Gene therapy shows promise in treating a genetic skin disease that causes blistering, according to researchers. In the early stage clinical trial, researchers from the Stanford University School of Medicine tested the therapy on four adults with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. People with this skin condition aren't able to produce a protein that binds the upper and lower levels of skin together. At the slightest friction, these layers slide and create blisters. In the worst cases, death occurs in infancy, the researchers said. In the current research, grafts of the patients' own genetically corrected skin were applied to open wounds caused by the disease. The grafts improved wound healing and seemed to be well-tolerated, researchers reported. "Our phase 1 trial shows the treatment appears safe, and we were fortunate to see some good clinical ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Skin and Structure Infection, Diagnosis and Investigation

6 Keys to a Safe, Allergy-Free Halloween

Posted 10 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 – Halloween can be really scary for kids with asthma and allergies – and for their parents – unless they take precautions, an allergist advises. "Keep certain common sense tips in mind as you prepare for the holiday," said Bryan Martin, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI). "A little preparation can ensure your little ones don't suffer from allergic reactions or asthma attacks," Martin said in an ACAAI news release. To help parents prepare, he offered these six tips: Masks can be scary. For kids with asthma, try to choose a costume that doesn't require a mask. If a child insists on one, it should not be tight-fitting or obstruct breathing. Halloween makeup sometimes causes allergic reactions. Use only high-quality, hypoallergenic makeup, and test it on a small patch of skin in advance to see if it triggers a reaction. Skip ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Chlorpheniramine, Xyzal

Scientists Zero In on Cause of Rare, Disfiguring Skin Disorder

Posted 22 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 22, 2016 – The rare genetic skin condition ichthyosis leaves those affected with red, scaly skin. Now, scientists say they may have pinpointed both the cause of the disease and a potential treatment. "These patients are tremendously disfigured by this skin disease," explained lead researcher Dr. Amy Paller, an attending physician at the Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital in Chicago. "It can be painful, itchy and easily gets infected. They may have trouble using their hands and walking," she said in a hospital news release. The disorder has long baffled scientists, Paller said. However, her team's research may have identified the underlying cause of ichthyosis, and it's similar to what drives a far more common skin condition – psoriasis. Paller and her team discovered that a part of the immune system, known as the Th17 pathway, is overly active in people with ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Dry Skin, Diagnosis and Investigation, Ichthyosis

'Hard' Tap Water Linked to Eczema in Babies

Posted 2 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 1, 2016 – "Hard," mineral-laden water may increase the risk of a baby getting the skin condition eczema, a new British study suggests. Eczema is a chronic condition marked by itchiness and rashes. The study included 1,300 3-month old infants from across the United Kingdom. Researchers checked hardness – the water's mineral content – and chlorine levels in the water supply where the babies lived. Babies who lived in areas with hard water were up to 87 percent more likely to have eczema, the study found. "Our study builds on growing evidence of a link between exposure to hard water and the risk of developing eczema in childhood," said lead author Dr. Carsten Flohr, from the Institute of Dermatology at King's College London. The study wasn't designed to prove a cause-and-effect relationship, so further research is needed to learn more about this apparent link, Flohr ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Eczema, Dermatitis, Contact Dermatitis, Atopic Dermatitis, Minor Skin Conditions, Minor Skin Irritation

Zika Symptoms May Vary, So Testing Is Crucial

Posted 11 May 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 11, 2016 – Zika infection isn't always obvious. In one recent case, a rash, bloodshot eyes and spots in the mouth were key symptoms of infection with the mosquito-borne virus, researchers report. The 44-year-old patient had no fever, a common sign of Zika infection. But he complained of headache, fatigue and redness on his arms and hands just days after returning to the United States from Puerto Rico, where the mosquito-borne virus is circulating. Zika infection was only confirmed by blood and urine tests administered after the man recovered. Researchers are publicizing the case to highlight lesser known characteristics of the illness, which is usually mild but can cause serious birth defects and neurological problems. "Our aim [is] to provide a more detailed description of skin, mucosal and tissue findings than exists in the literature, with the goal of improving ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Diagnosis and Investigation, Zika Virus Infection

Health Tip: Got Eczema?

Posted 28 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Bleach bath therapy may be an effective way to manage eczema, if it's approved by the patient's dermatologist. The American Academy of Dermatology suggests: Carefully measure the amount of bleach to mix with bath water. Use 1/2 cup bleach in a full tub, 1/4 cup in a half-full tub, or one teaspoon of bleach per gallon of water for a baby or toddler. Use only regular 6 percent strength bleach, never concentrated. Always pour bleach into the tub and never apply directly to skin. Allow the tub to finish filling before the person with eczema climbs in. Discuss with the dermatologist the appropriate length of the bleach bath – usually between five minutes and 10 minutes. As soon as the person emerges from the bath, gently pat the skin dry and apply any prescribed eczema medication. Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Eczema, Dry Skin, Dermatitis, Contact Dermatitis, Atopic Dermatitis, Dermatitis Herpetiformis, Dermatitis - Drug-Induced, Minor Skin Irritation, Minor Skin Conditions

Health Tip: Coping With Rosacea

Posted 22 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

-- The redness of rosacea can be difficult to manage, but getting treatment can help your skin and your confidence. The American Academy of Dermatology suggests: Keep a journal logging things that seem to trigger rosacea flares. Some common triggers include exposure to sunlight, certain beverages and foods, and emotional stress. See a dermatologist, who can help you determine and avoid your triggers. A dermatologist also can help you create plans for skin care and treatment. Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Skin Infection, Rosacea, Minor Skin Irritation, Minor Skin Conditions

Health Tip: Washing Your Skin When You Have Eczema

Posted 15 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

-- When you have eczema, bathing properly can help keep redness and itching in check. The National Eczema Association recommends: Bathe at least once daily. Limit the bath or shower to about 10 minutes, and keep the water lukewarm, not hot. Don't use a washcloth to scrub skin. Use a mild cleanser or soap. If your skin is flaring badly, it's best to limit or avoid cleansers. While your skin is still damp, apply topical medication. Then apply a generous amount of moisturizer to help lock in moisture and ease itching and dryness. Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Eczema, Dry Skin, Minor Skin Irritation, Minor Skin Conditions

What You Need to Know When Your Child Gets a Rash

Posted 6 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 6, 2015 – When children develop a rash, parents might think it's simply due to a skin irritation. But viruses are also a common cause of rashes in children, an expert says. "Causes of rashes vary immensely and it can be difficult for parents to know if they should be concerned," Dr. Heidi Renner, a pediatrician at Loyola Medicine and assistant professor at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, said in a university news release. "Rashes can be caused by anything from an allergic reaction to viral illness to something more serious," she explained. "Most childhood rashes are no cause for concern, but it's always best to talk to your pediatrician," Renner added. In most cases, childhood rashes get better on their own or are easily treated. But rashes can be a symptom of another illness or virus, and a child with a rash should be seen by a doctor, Renner said. ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash

Health Tip: Easing Hives

Posted 20 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Hives are red, itchy skin welts that stem from an allergic reaction. Finding out what caused the hives is a first step in ending the itch. The ease the discomfort and prevent hives from returning, the American Academy of Dermatology advises: Hives may be triggered by food, medication, animals, pollen, stress or infection. A mild case may not need treatment and may subside on its own. A cool shower or cool compress placed on the hives can help soothe itch. If you have frequent bouts of hives, you may want to find a support group to help you cope. Hives accompanied by serious symptoms, such as difficulty breathing, may need an emergency medication. Speak to your doctor. Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Hives, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Urticaria, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Chlorpheniramine, Xyzal

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prednisone, chamomile, Cortizone-10, devil's claw, Locoid, Deltasone, Caladryl Clear, Cortaid, pennyroyal, view more... Nutracort, Locoid Lipocream, Hytone, Pontocaine, Aquanil HC, Corticaine, diflorasone, Dermarest Dricort, Cortizone-10 Plus, Cortaid Maximum Strength, Encort, Pandel, Cortane, Sterapred DS, Instacort, Instacort 10, Hycort, Dermatop, Sterapred, Liquid Pred, bilberry, Dermtex HC, Cort-Dome, Scalp-Cort, Beta HC, Genasone / Aloe, Ivocort, Cortizone for Kids, Cortizone-5, Nupercainal HC 1%, Neutrogena T-Scalp, Dermarest Plus Anti-Itch, Hemril-30, Ultravate PAC, Callergy Clear, Keratol HC, Carmol HC, Pediaderm HC, Dermasorb HC, Caldyphen Clear, Procto-Med HC, Clear Calamine, NuCort, Halac, Dermocaine, Ala-Scalp, Gynecort Maximum Strength, NuZon, Cortaid Intensive Therapy, U-Cort, Itch-X Lotion, Scalp-Aid, Hydrocortisone 1% In Absorbase, Scalacort, MD Hydrocortisone, Proctosert HC, Caldecort, Psorcon E, Florone E, Psorcon, Florone, ApexiCon E, Viractin, Dermacort, Cetacort, Cort-Dome High Potency, Prednicot, Prednicen-M, aluminum hydroxide topical, pramoxine / zinc acetate, ammonium lactate / halobetasol, prednicarbate, Apexicon, Maxiflor, Orasone, Meticorten, Scalpicin, Westcort, Aeroseb-HC, Dermol HC, Delcort, Corticreme, Aloe Cort, Dermolate, Gly-Cort, Rederm, Nogenic HC, Hi-Cor, Acticort 100, Cortaid with Aloe, Ala-Cort, Hydrocort cream, Hemril-HC Uniserts, Texacort, Penecort, Cotacort, Hemorrhoidal HC, Ala-Scalp HP, Lacticare-HC, Sarnol-HC