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Sirolimus News

Kidney Woes Tied to Raised Cancer Risk, Study Finds

Posted 12 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 12, 2015 – Kidney failure and having a kidney transplant may increase the risk for certain types of cancer, a new study suggests. Poor kidney function and immune system-suppressing drugs may be behind this increased risk, according to Elizabeth Yanik, of the U.S. National Cancer Institute, and colleagues. For the study, published in the Nov. 12 online edition of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, the researchers looked at data from more than 200,000 U.S. kidney transplant candidates and recipients. Along with finding that these patients are at increased risk for certain types of cancer, the investigators also identified clear patterns of risk associated with different types of treatment. However, the associations seen in the study do not prove cause-and-effect. The risk of kidney and thyroid cancers was especially high when kidney failure patients were on ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Methotrexate, Renal Failure, CellCept, Gilenya, Tysabri, Imuran, Xolair, Orencia, Chronic Kidney Disease, Revlimid, Leflunomide, Arava, Azathioprine, Afinitor, Tecfidera, Mycophenolate Mofetil, Peritoneal dialysis, Aubagio, Benlysta

FDA Approves Rapamune (sirolimus) for Rare Lung Disease Lymphangioleiomyomatosis

Posted 1 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

May 28, 2015 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Rapamune (sirolimus), to treat lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM), a rare, progressive lung disease that primarily affects women of childbearing age. This is the first drug approved to treat the disease. LAM is characterized by an abnormal growth of smooth muscle cells that invade lung tissues, including the airways, and blood/lymph vessels that cause destruction of the lung, resulting in airflow obstruction, and limiting the delivery of oxygen to the body. LAM is a very rare disease. According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, only between two and five women per million women worldwide are known to have the disease. Rapamune, which is available as both a tablet and an oral solution, was originally approved in 1999 as an immunosuppressive agent to help prevent organ rejection in patients 13 years and older ... Read more

Related support groups: Sirolimus, Rapamune, Lymphangioleiomyomatosis

Grapefruit Juice May Give Boost to Cancer Treatment: Study

Posted 7 Aug 2012 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 7 – In a small study of patients with incurable cancer, drinking 8 ounces of grapefruit juice a day boosted the effect of a drug they were given during the study. Although some participants had a response, tumors did not disappear after using the drug, which is mostly used to treat conditions unrelated to cancer. The study's main finding was that grapefruit juice might allow treatment using smaller drug dosages, therefore reducing side effects and perhaps costs. Sirolimus (Rapamune) is an immunosuppressant and not approved as a cancer drug. Its primary use is to prevent rejection after kidney transplants. It is also used as a treatment for psoriasis, the researchers noted. Some early studies suggest that sirolimus may have tumor-fighting effects. Derivatives of the drug are used in kidney cancer and breast cancer. The drug, however, has what is called poor ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Sirolimus, Rapamune

Organ Transplant Drug Might Treat Rapid-Aging Disease in Kids

Posted 30 Jun 2011 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 29 – A drug currently used to fight rejection in organ transplant recipients may also reverse DNA cell damage in children with a rare, deadly disorder that leaves them old long before their time, a new study suggests. Researchers from the U.S. National Institutes of Health and several universities and hospitals used the antibiotic rapamycin on skin cells taken from children with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), which typically kills sufferers during their teenage years. About 100 cases of progeria have been documented since the disease was discovered at the turn of the 20th century. Rapamycin appeared to heighten the cells' ability to clear out a toxic protein called progerin, which causes children with progeria to develop skin and joint problems as well as advanced cardiovascular disease that quickly proves fatal. Progerin is present in small amounts in ... Read more

Related support groups: Sirolimus, Rapamune

Transplant Drug May Fight Rare Lung Disorder

Posted 17 Mar 2011 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 16 – An already approved transplant-rejection drug is the first treatment to show a benefit for women with a rare lung disease that has had no cure or, until now, even a treatment. The drug, sirolimus (Rapamycin), improved both lung function and quality of life in women with lymphangioleiomyomatosis, or LAM, according to a study published online March 16 in the New England Journal of Medicine. "To have a therapy for this disease is rare and special," said the study's lead author, Dr. Francis X. McCormack, a professor and director of pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine at the University of Cincinnati and scientific director of the LAM Foundation in Cincinnati, which helped fund the trial and also recruited participants. LAM is characterized by progressive loss of lung function from the invasion of abnormal muscle tissue that obstructs airways. According to the ... Read more

Related support groups: Sirolimus, Rapamune

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Related Condition Support Groups

Lymphangioleiomyomatosis, Organ Transplant - Rejection Prophylaxis

Related Drug Support Groups

Rapamune

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