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Patients May Quickly Lose Beneficial Gut Bacteria in the ICU

Posted 31 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 31, 2016 – Intensive care patients have a significant loss of helpful gut bacteria within days of entering the hospital, a new study finds. These bacteria help keep people well. Losing them puts patients at risk for hospital-acquired infections that may lead to sepsis, organ failure and even death, according to the researchers. For the study, the investigators analyzed gut bacteria from 115 intensive care unit (ICU) patients at four hospitals in the United States and Canada. Measurements were taken 48 hours after admission and after either 10 days in the ICU or leaving the hospital. Compared with healthy people, the ICU patients had lower levels of helpful bacteria and higher levels of potentially harmful bacteria, the findings showed. "The results were what we feared them to be. We saw a massive depletion of normal, health-promoting species," study leader Dr. Paul ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Gastrointestinal Disorders, Sepsis, Organ Transplant, Septicemia, Wound Sepsis

Fast Action Can Prevent Sepsis Death: CDC

Posted 23 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 23, 2016 – Many cases of life-threatening sepsis could be recognized and treated long before it causes severe illness or death, U.S. health officials report. Sepsis, or septicemia, occurs when the body has an extreme response to an infection. Without prompt treatment, organ failure can quickly follow. Researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that about 70 percent of patients with sepsis had used health care services recently or had chronic diseases that required regular medical care. That means there are many opportunities for health care providers to intercept sepsis along its potentially deadly course, according to the CDC report. "When sepsis occurs, it should be treated as a medical emergency," CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden said in an agency news release. "Doctors and nurses can prevent sepsis and also the devastating effects of ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Sepsis, Bacteremia, Septicemia, Wound Cleansing, Wound Debridement, Wound Sepsis

Persistent Critical Illness May Keep Patients From Leaving ICU

Posted 5 May 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 4, 2016 – A small group of patients uses one-third of intensive care unit resources, a new study contends. Researchers analyzed data from more than one million ICU patients in Australia and New Zealand, and found that just 5 percent of them accounted for 33 percent of all days that ICU beds got used. These are critically ill patients who go from one health crisis to another and may never get well enough to leave the ICU, according to the study authors. The findings could lead to better care and efforts to find ways to prevent patients from slipping into this situation, which the researchers called persistent critical illness. "We have found that this truly is a separate 'thing' – a state patients transition into where you're there because you're there, stuck in this cascade that we can't get you out of," said study leader Dr. Theodore Iwashyna. He is a University of ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Sepsis, Bacteremia, Septicemia, ICU Agitation, Wound Sepsis

Families Like Looser ICU Visitation Policies

Posted 4 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 4, 2016 – Many hospitals still restrict who can visit critically ill patients and when. But new survey results suggest that lifting such restrictions can improve family satisfaction and patient well-being. "The term 'visiting hours' is obsolete due to the growing evidence related to the wide-ranging benefits of open access for ICU [intensive-care unit] families," said senior study author Dr. Samuel Brown. He is director of the Center for Humanizing Critical Care at Intermountain Medical Center in Murray, Utah. The study involved 103 family members visiting patients in the intensive care unit and 128 ICU nurses. About half were surveyed before an unrestricted patient visitation policy was implemented at the medical center and half were questioned after. With the new policy, visitors are allowed at all times, if patients agree and are well enough. Previously, visits were ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Sepsis, Septicemia, ICU Agitation

Families of Critically Ill Patients Need Extra Support, Too

Posted 31 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 31, 2015 – When a loved one is admitted to a hospital intensive care unit (ICU), family members need support, too. "Families are totally unprepared for a sudden injury and overwhelmed when it is a very serious injury. Families need a road map to guide them through their worst moments, and that is my job," said Kelly McElligott, a clinical social worker in the burn center at Loyola University Health System in Maywood, Ill. Each year, roughly 2.1 million patients are transferred from an emergency room to an intensive care unit, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. McElligott described several ways people can deal with the sudden hospitalization of a critically ill loved one, including: Take care of yourself. "If you do not take care of yourself, you cannot take care of someone else," she said. "Many family members, especially parents, feel ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Sepsis, Septicemia

Improper Antibiotic Use Often Due to Misdiagnosis: Study

Posted 20 May 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 20, 2015 – Misdiagnosis often leads to improper antibiotic use in hospitals, new research finds. Incorrect antibiotic use can cause patient harm, reduce the effectiveness of antibiotics and increase health care costs, the researchers noted. "Antibiotic therapies are used for approximately 56 percent of inpatients in U.S. hospitals, but are found to be inappropriate in nearly half of these cases, and many of these failures are connected with inaccurate diagnoses," study author Dr. Greg Filice said in a news release from the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. Filice, an internist with the Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Health Care System, and his colleagues analyzed 500 inpatient cases at the Minneapolis VA Medical Center. They found that inappropriate use of antibiotics occurred with 95 percent of patients who received an incorrect or indeterminate diagnosis, ... Read more

Related support groups: Urinary Tract Infection, Metronidazole, Bactrim, Bladder Infection, Pneumonia, Flagyl, Bactrim DS, Kidney Infections, Sulfamethoxazole/Trimethoprim, Xifaxan, Polymyxin B, Sepsis, Septra, Zyvox, Bacitracin, Rifaximin, Metro, SMZ-TMP DS, Septra DS, Sulfatrim

Researchers Hone in on Genes Linked to Serious Blood Infection

Posted 13 May 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 13, 2015 – It might be possible to develop a blood test that would diagnose severe blood infections (sepsis) at an earlier stage than can be done currently, new research suggests. Stanford University researchers have identified a pattern of gene activity associated specifically with sepsis. Sepsis is the leading cause of hospital deaths in the United States, according to the researchers. The condition is associated with the early deaths of at least 750,000 Americans a year and costs the health care system more than $24 billion annually. "It's critical for clinicians to diagnose sepsis accurately and quickly, because the risk of death from this condition increases with every passing hour it goes untreated," study senior author Purvesh Khatri, an assistant professor of biomedical informatics research, said in a university news release. However, it can be difficult to ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Sepsis, Diagnosis and Investigation, Septicemia

Hospitalizations After Severe Blood Infections May Be Preventable

Posted 10 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 10, 2015 – When people survive life-threatening blood infections, it's common for them to land back in the hospital within a few months. But a new study suggests that could often be avoided. The research, published in the March 10 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, focused on older Americans who were hospitalized for a severe blood infection, also known as sepsis. Sepsis arises from a powerful immune reaction to an infection, such as pneumonia or urinary tract infection: Chemicals released to fight the bacteria or virus begin to trigger inflammatory responses throughout the body – potentially causing blood clots, leaky blood vessels and multiple organ failure. Severe sepsis is often fatal, but even when people survive, they commonly land back in the hospital within 90 days, said study author Dr. Hallie Prescott, a researcher at the University of ... Read more

Related support groups: Sepsis, Septicemia, Wound Sepsis

Hospital Infection Rates Falling, But More Improvement Needed: CDC

Posted 14 Jan 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 – Rates of many types of hospital-acquired infections are on the decline, but more work is needed to protect patients, according to a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report. "Hospitals have made real progress to reduce some types of health care-associated infections – it can be done," CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden said Wednesday in an agency news release. The study used national data to track outcomes at more than 14,500 health care centers across the United States. The researchers found a 46 percent drop in "central line-associated" bloodstream infections between 2008 and 2013. This type of infection occurs when a tube placed in a large vein is either not put in correctly or not kept clean, the CDC explained. During that same time, there was a 19 percent decrease in surgical site infections among patients who underwent the 10 types of surgery ... Read more

Related support groups: Sepsis, Septicemia, Wound Sepsis

Many Hospitals Ineffectively Treat Bloodstream Infections, Study Suggests

Posted 18 Mar 2014 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 18, 2014 – More than one-third of community hospital patients with serious bloodstream infections receive inappropriate antibiotic treatment, according to a new study. Most Americans use community care hospitals, rather than those that provide highly specialized care (tertiary care centers), according to the authors of the study, which was published March 18 in the journal PLoS One. "Our study provides a much-needed update on what we're seeing in community hospitals, and, ultimately, we're finding similar types of infections in these hospitals as in tertiary care centers," said study lead author Dr. Deverick Anderson, an associate professor of medicine at Duke University. "It's a challenge to identify bloodstream infections and treat them quickly and appropriately, but this study shows that there is room for improvement in both kinds of hospital settings," Anderson added ... Read more

Related support groups: Bacterial Infection, Septicemia

Severe Blood Infections During Childbirth on Rise in U.S. Women

Posted 26 Sep 2013 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 26 – In a disturbing trend, rates of severe sepsis and deaths from sepsis during childbirth rose sharply in the United States over a 10-year period, a new study reveals. The researchers said their findings show the need for improved detection of sepsis in all women during labor and delivery, even those with no apparent risk factors for sepsis, a severe illness in which bacteria overwhelm the bloodstream. For the study, Dr. Melissa Bauer, of the University of Michigan Health System in Ann Arbor, and colleagues analyzed national data from 1998 through 2008 and found that, overall, sepsis occurred at a rate of one per every 3,333 women who were in a hospital to give birth. The rate did not change significantly over the study period. Severe sepsis – which can lead to multiple organ failure – occurred in about one in 11,000 women. The rate of severe sepsis approximately ... Read more

Related support groups: Septicemia, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

FDA Medwatch Alert: Hospira Lactated Ringer's And 5% Dextrose Injection, 1000 Ml, Flexible Containers: Recall - Mold Contamination

Posted 8 Oct 2012 by Drugs.com

ISSUE: FDA and Hospira announced it is initiating a voluntary user-level recall of one lot of Lactated Ringer’s and 5% Dextrose Injection, USP, 1000 mL, Flexible Container, NDC 0409-7929-09. This action is due to one confirmed customer report where a leak was identified in the primary container between the cobra cap and fill-tube seal and a spore-like structured particulate, consistent with mold, was noted in the solution. When a primary container within an overwrap has a leak, there is an open pathway for contamination of the fluid. The overwrap is not sterile, and any fluid which may have leaked out may become trapped within the overwrap and has the potential to be reintroduced into the primary container. If contaminated solution is used on a patient, critical patient harm may result.  Injections of mold could potentially lead to septicemia (blood stream infections), which in a wo ... Read more

Related support groups: Septicemia, Lvp Solution, Extraneal, Normosol-R, Dextrose and Ringer's, Dialyte, Ringer's and Dextrose, Inpersol, Delflex, Plasma-Lyte, Inpersol-LM

Blood Infection Costliest U.S. Hospital Condition: Report

Posted 9 Oct 2011 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 7 – Septicemia was the single most expensive condition treated in U.S. hospitals in 2009, with a cost of about $15.4 billion, according to a federal government report. Septicemia is a life-threatening illness caused by blood infections with bacteria such as E. coli and methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The analysis of national data also showed that the number of hospital stays for septicemia more than doubled between 2000 and 2009, from 337,100 to 836,000 admissions. In 2009, septicemia was the sixth most common primary cause of hospitalization in the United States. Complications from medical devices, implants or grafts were the leading cause of these admissions, accounting for 20 percent of the septicemia stays. The report is published in the latest News and Numbers from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. In 2009, the in-hospital death rate ... Read more

Related support groups: Septicemia

Almost Half of Deaths in Kids Under 5 Occur in 5 Countries

Posted 12 May 2010 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 11 – Infectious diseases such as pneumonia, diarrhea, malaria and blood poisoning account for more than two-thirds of the 8.8 million annual deaths in kids under 5 years of age worldwide, a new report shows. Other leading causes of death for children include birth complications, lack of oxygen during birth and congenital defects. The authors of the report found that infectious diseases caused 5.97 million deaths among kids under age 5 in 2008. Pneumonia (18 percent), diarrhea (15 percent) and malaria (8 percent) accounted for the highest numbers. About 40 percent of the deaths were in infants aged no more than 27 days. Almost half of these deaths occurred in just five countries – China, Nigeria, India, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Pakistan. Africa (4.2 million) and Southeast Asia (2.39 million) accounted for the highest numbers of deaths. Countries with high ... Read more

Related support groups: Diarrhea, Pneumonia, Malaria, Septicemia

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