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Sepsis News

Heart Risk Up if Hospitalized for Pneumonia or Sepsis

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 11, 2017 – Adults who've been hospitalized with pneumonia or sepsis have a higher risk of heart disease, a new European study reports. Researchers examined data from nearly 237,000 Swedish men. They were followed from age 18 into middle age. The study found that those admitted to the hospital with pneumonia or sepsis (a bacterial infection of the blood) had a six times higher risk of heart disease in the following year. The rate dropped significantly during the second and third years, but was still more than double. And, by the fourth and fifth years, the risk remained almost two times higher in those who'd been hospitalized for sepsis or pneumonia compared to those who hadn't. The study was published recently in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. While most patients with sepsis or pneumonia recover from these conditions, many still have inflammation after the ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Obesity, Lisinopril, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Losartan, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Benicar, Pneumonia, Diovan, Crestor, Atorvastatin, Pravastatin, Angina, Ramipril, Cozaar, Valsartan, Micardis, Enalapril

Hospital Protocol Helps Thwart Serious Infection

Posted 24 May 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 24, 2017 – A new regulation requires New York state hospitals to follow a protocol to rapidly diagnosis and treat the potentially fatal infection known as sepsis, and research suggests it's saving lives. The mandate was implemented after the death of 12-year-old Rory Staunton from undiagnosed sepsis in 2012. After the boy died, "Rory's Regulations" was passed in New York in 2013. The protocol includes a blood culture to determine infection, a measure of blood lactate to determine tissue stress, and to give antibiotics within three hours of diagnosis. It was the first regulation of its kind in the United States. However, medical experts have been divided on whether Rory's Regulations actually saves lives. Sepsis, a life-threatening and sometimes rapid complication of infection, is the leading cause of death of hospital patients in the United States. At least 1.5 million ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Skin and Structure Infection, Sepsis, Septicemia, Wound Infection, Wound Sepsis

Overcrowded ERs Risky for Some Seriously Ill Patients

Posted 21 May 2017 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, May 21, 2017 – People with the potentially life-threatening infection complication known as sepsis are less likely to receive immediate antibiotic treatment in overcrowded emergency departments, researchers say. "Prompt initiation of appropriate antibiotics is the cornerstone of high-quality sepsis care, a fact emphasized in Medicare quality measures and international guidelines," said the study's lead author, Dr. Ithan Peltan. He is a physician at the Intermountain Medical Center and University of Utah School of Medicine. Each one-hour delay in receiving antibiotics is associated with as much as a 10 percent increase in the risk of death from sepsis, Peltan pointed out in a news release from the American Thoracic Society. The study looked at 945 sepsis patients at emergency departments of four hospitals in Utah. The patients were seen between July 2013 and December 2015. ... Read more

Related support groups: Bacterial Infection, Sepsis, Septicemia, Wound Cleansing, Wound Debridement, Wound Sepsis

Far Fewer Kids Are Dying Worldwide, but Gains Are Uneven

Posted 3 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 3, 2017 – Despite a dramatic decline in child and teen deaths around the world since 1990, progress remains uneven, a new study shows. Child and teen deaths worldwide fell from just over 14 billion in 1990 to about 7 billion in 2015. The most common causes of death were preterm birth complications, respiratory infections, diarrhea, birth defects, malaria, sepsis, meningitis and HIV/AIDS, according to data on people age 19 and younger in 195 countries and territories. Countries with lower scores on a measure of income, education and fertility known as a Sociodemographic Index (SDI) had a larger share of global child/teen deaths in 2015 than in 1990. Most occurred in South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. One reason for the regional differences may be that places with the lowest SDI scores historically have not received significant development aid for health, according to study ... Read more

Related support groups: Diarrhea, HIV Infection, Malaria, Sepsis, Diarrhea, Acute, Infectious Diarrhea, Wound Sepsis

Anti-Inflammatory Agent in Cord Blood Shows Promise in Mice

Posted 9 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 9, 2016 – Scientists report that a factor found in umbilical cord blood helped fight harmful inflammation in mice, and could point the way to new treatments for humans. Inflammation is common, and in certain circumstances it damages healthy tissue. Out-of-control inflammation is associated with a number of conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis and sepsis, a common cause of hospital patient deaths. Sepsis is the body's overreaction to infection. Scientists from the University of Utah School of Medicine isolated neonatal NET inhibitory factor (nNIF) from cord blood. The factor occurs in the blood of newborns for about two weeks after birth. It is not found in older babies or adults. When given to mice, nNIF reduced inflammation and sepsis-related problems such as fever, breathing fluctuations and death, according to the study. Without treatment, only 20 percent of the ... Read more

Related support groups: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Inflammatory Conditions, Sepsis, Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, Diagnosis and Investigation

Patients May Quickly Lose Beneficial Gut Bacteria in the ICU

Posted 31 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 31, 2016 – Intensive care patients have a significant loss of helpful gut bacteria within days of entering the hospital, a new study finds. These bacteria help keep people well. Losing them puts patients at risk for hospital-acquired infections that may lead to sepsis, organ failure and even death, according to the researchers. For the study, the investigators analyzed gut bacteria from 115 intensive care unit (ICU) patients at four hospitals in the United States and Canada. Measurements were taken 48 hours after admission and after either 10 days in the ICU or leaving the hospital. Compared with healthy people, the ICU patients had lower levels of helpful bacteria and higher levels of potentially harmful bacteria, the findings showed. "The results were what we feared them to be. We saw a massive depletion of normal, health-promoting species," study leader Dr. Paul ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Gastrointestinal Disorders, Sepsis, Organ Transplant, Septicemia, Wound Sepsis

Fast Action Can Prevent Sepsis Death: CDC

Posted 23 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 23, 2016 – Many cases of life-threatening sepsis could be recognized and treated long before it causes severe illness or death, U.S. health officials report. Sepsis, or septicemia, occurs when the body has an extreme response to an infection. Without prompt treatment, organ failure can quickly follow. Researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that about 70 percent of patients with sepsis had used health care services recently or had chronic diseases that required regular medical care. That means there are many opportunities for health care providers to intercept sepsis along its potentially deadly course, according to the CDC report. "When sepsis occurs, it should be treated as a medical emergency," CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden said in an agency news release. "Doctors and nurses can prevent sepsis and also the devastating effects of ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Sepsis, Bacteremia, Septicemia, Wound Cleansing, Wound Sepsis, Wound Debridement

Persistent Critical Illness May Keep Patients From Leaving ICU

Posted 5 May 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 4, 2016 – A small group of patients uses one-third of intensive care unit resources, a new study contends. Researchers analyzed data from more than one million ICU patients in Australia and New Zealand, and found that just 5 percent of them accounted for 33 percent of all days that ICU beds got used. These are critically ill patients who go from one health crisis to another and may never get well enough to leave the ICU, according to the study authors. The findings could lead to better care and efforts to find ways to prevent patients from slipping into this situation, which the researchers called persistent critical illness. "We have found that this truly is a separate 'thing' – a state patients transition into where you're there because you're there, stuck in this cascade that we can't get you out of," said study leader Dr. Theodore Iwashyna. He is a University of ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Sepsis, Bacteremia, ICU Agitation, Septicemia, Wound Sepsis

Families Like Looser ICU Visitation Policies

Posted 4 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 4, 2016 – Many hospitals still restrict who can visit critically ill patients and when. But new survey results suggest that lifting such restrictions can improve family satisfaction and patient well-being. "The term 'visiting hours' is obsolete due to the growing evidence related to the wide-ranging benefits of open access for ICU [intensive-care unit] families," said senior study author Dr. Samuel Brown. He is director of the Center for Humanizing Critical Care at Intermountain Medical Center in Murray, Utah. The study involved 103 family members visiting patients in the intensive care unit and 128 ICU nurses. About half were surveyed before an unrestricted patient visitation policy was implemented at the medical center and half were questioned after. With the new policy, visitors are allowed at all times, if patients agree and are well enough. Previously, visits were ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Sepsis, ICU Agitation, Septicemia

Families of Critically Ill Patients Need Extra Support, Too

Posted 31 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 31, 2015 – When a loved one is admitted to a hospital intensive care unit (ICU), family members need support, too. "Families are totally unprepared for a sudden injury and overwhelmed when it is a very serious injury. Families need a road map to guide them through their worst moments, and that is my job," said Kelly McElligott, a clinical social worker in the burn center at Loyola University Health System in Maywood, Ill. Each year, roughly 2.1 million patients are transferred from an emergency room to an intensive care unit, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. McElligott described several ways people can deal with the sudden hospitalization of a critically ill loved one, including: Take care of yourself. "If you do not take care of yourself, you cannot take care of someone else," she said. "Many family members, especially parents, feel ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Sepsis, Septicemia

Extreme Exercising Can Lead to Blood Poisoning, Study Reveals

Posted 19 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 19, 2015 – Extreme exercise may trigger blood poisoning in people who haven't trained properly, a new study suggests. Researchers in Australia looked at athletes who took part in extreme endurance events. Examples of such events include 24-hour ultra-marathons and multi-stage ultra-marathons run on consecutive days. The investigators found this type of exertion can cause intestinal bacteria to leak into the bloodstream. This can potentially lead to blood poisoning, they said. Blood samples were taken before and after the events, and compared with a control group. The researchers said these samples proved that "exercise over a prolonged period of time causes the gut wall to change, allowing the naturally present bacteria, known as endotoxins, in the gut to leak into the bloodstream." Once those bacteria are in the bloodstream, the immune system responds, causing ... Read more

Related support groups: Sepsis

Recent Hospitalization Might Raise Blood Infection Risk, Study Says

Posted 3 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 3, 2015 – A routine hospital stay may put older adults at risk for a potentially deadly condition called sepsis, according to a new study. Sepsis is a catastrophic, whole-body response to infection, according to the researchers. The study looked at data from nearly 11,000 older Americans. Over 12 years, there were 43,000 hospitalizations. The researchers found people were three times more likely to develop sepsis within three months after leaving the hospital than at any other time. The analysis also showed that the risk of sepsis three months after a hospital stay was 30 percent higher for those who received care for any type of infection. The risk of sepsis three months after hospitalization was 70 percent higher for those who had an intestinal infection caused by Clostridium difficile (or C. difficile) bacteria, the study revealed. One in 10 C. difficile infection ... Read more

Related support groups: Sepsis, Clostridial Infection, Wound Sepsis

Improper Antibiotic Use Often Due to Misdiagnosis: Study

Posted 20 May 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 20, 2015 – Misdiagnosis often leads to improper antibiotic use in hospitals, new research finds. Incorrect antibiotic use can cause patient harm, reduce the effectiveness of antibiotics and increase health care costs, the researchers noted. "Antibiotic therapies are used for approximately 56 percent of inpatients in U.S. hospitals, but are found to be inappropriate in nearly half of these cases, and many of these failures are connected with inaccurate diagnoses," study author Dr. Greg Filice said in a news release from the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. Filice, an internist with the Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Health Care System, and his colleagues analyzed 500 inpatient cases at the Minneapolis VA Medical Center. They found that inappropriate use of antibiotics occurred with 95 percent of patients who received an incorrect or indeterminate diagnosis, ... Read more

Related support groups: Urinary Tract Infection, Metronidazole, Bactrim, Bladder Infection, Pneumonia, Flagyl, Kidney Infections, Bactrim DS, Sulfamethoxazole/Trimethoprim, Xifaxan, Polymyxin B, Sepsis, Septra, Metro, Zyvox, Bacitracin, Rifaximin, SMZ-TMP DS, Septra DS, Chloramphenicol

Researchers Hone in on Genes Linked to Serious Blood Infection

Posted 13 May 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 13, 2015 – It might be possible to develop a blood test that would diagnose severe blood infections (sepsis) at an earlier stage than can be done currently, new research suggests. Stanford University researchers have identified a pattern of gene activity associated specifically with sepsis. Sepsis is the leading cause of hospital deaths in the United States, according to the researchers. The condition is associated with the early deaths of at least 750,000 Americans a year and costs the health care system more than $24 billion annually. "It's critical for clinicians to diagnose sepsis accurately and quickly, because the risk of death from this condition increases with every passing hour it goes untreated," study senior author Purvesh Khatri, an assistant professor of biomedical informatics research, said in a university news release. However, it can be difficult to ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Sepsis, Septicemia, Diagnosis and Investigation

Simpler Antibiotic Regimen Helps Sick Babies in Developing Nations

Posted 2 Apr 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 1, 2015 – Newborns and young infants in developing nations who have suspected severe bacterial infections can be effectively treated outside a hospital, two new studies suggest. The findings indicate that the World Health Organization's guidelines on treating newborns and young infants with possible bacterial infections – such as pneumonia and sepsis (blood infection) – should be altered, the researchers said. About one in five babies worldwide develops severe bacterial infections during the first month of life, leading to about 700,000 deaths in newborns every year, the researchers explained. Current WHO guidelines recommend that newborns and young infants believed to have such infections be hospitalized and treated with antibiotic injections for at least seven to 10 days. However, many parents in developing nations can't afford, or don't have access to, such ... Read more

Related support groups: Amoxicillin, Bacterial Infection, Pneumonia, Sepsis, Amoxil, Amoxil Pediatric Drops, Biomox, Trimox, Moxatag, Amoxicot, DisperMox, Apo-Amoxi, Moxilin, Wymox

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