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Salmonella Gastroenteritis News

Warmer Waters May Mean More Toxic Shellfish

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 9, 2017 – Unusually warm ocean temperatures near the U.S. Pacific Northwest have been linked to dangerous levels of a natural toxin in shellfish. But, researchers report they have developed new ways to predict these toxic outbreaks. The toxin, domoic acid, is produced by marine algae, or plant life. It builds up in seafood, posing a potential threat. Consuming the toxin can be harmful to humans, the researchers said. The project was funded by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). "We describe a completely new method to understanding and predicting toxic outbreaks on a large scale, linking domoic acid concentrations in shellfish to ocean conditions caused by warm water phases of natural climate event cycles," said study author Morgaine McKibben of Oregon State University. Those "climate event cycles" include El Nino and a similar but long-term ... Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Poisoning, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Salmonella Enteric Fever, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Enjoying Rare Meat Safely

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

-- If you prefer rare meat to well done, you might be wondering if the rare variety is safe. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics explains: A food thermometer should be used to make sure rare meat is hot enough to destroy any germs. Avoid using other cues, such as the color of meat, the color of juices or the firmness of meat, to determine if it's sufficiently cooked. Ground lamb, pork, veal or beef should be cooked to at least 160 degrees Fahrenheit at its center. Whole steak needs to be cooked to 145 degrees Fahrenheit at its center. Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Don't Let Food Poisoning Ruin Your Holiday Celebration

Posted 23 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 23, 2016 – Party guests always seem to wind up in the host's kitchen, but too many cooks boost the risk of mistakes that could lead to food poisoning, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The group says it's also important to keep food safety in mind when preparing homemade food gifts and holiday buffets. It offers these tips: Wash hands before, during and after preparing food. It's also important to wash when switching from one task to another. All kitchen surfaces – including appliances, countertops, cutting boards and utensils – should be kept clean throughout the cooking process. Use hot, soapy water. Never cut raw meat, poultry or fish on the same cutting board as foods like fruits and vegetables that don't have to be cooked. Using color-coded cutting boards can make it easier to remember which one to use for each food. Use different utensils for ... Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea Prophylaxis

How to Ship Food Gifts Without Risk

Posted 22 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 21, 2016 – Homemade food gifts can make loved ones afar feel closer, but it's important to take extra safety precautions to prevent food poisoning, according to the American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AAND). Bacteria that cause food-borne illnesses grow quickly at temperatures between 40 degrees and 140 degrees Fahrenheit, potentially doubling every 20 minutes, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. When shipping perishable items, make sure they are kept below 40 degrees, AAND advises. Let the recipient know a perishable package is on the way and be sure someone will be home to receive it. Even foods that are smoked, cured or fully cooked should be kept cold. This can be done using dry ice and foam or heavy corrugated cardboard packaging, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service recommends. Whenever ... Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Enteric Fever, Traveler's Diarrhea, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Using a Food Thermometer

Posted 9 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Using a food thermometer takes the guesswork out of determining whether food is cooked completely and is safe to eat. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics suggests the right way to use a food thermometer: Select the right type of thermometer for your needs, from pop-up to digital to manual. Make sure you follow product instructions. Use either ice water or freezing water to make sure the thermometer is accurate. Wait the recommended amount of time before you read your thermometer. Make sure you know the safe temperature for the type of food you are cooking. After using, always clean your thermometer with hot, soapy water. Read more

Related support groups: Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Prep Your Refrigerator for the Holidays

Posted 8 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Your fridge may be overflowing with leftovers from holiday meals. Here are some tips to safely preserve all that food, courtesy of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Set the fridge temperature between 33 and 40 degrees Fahrenheit, and your freezer at 0 degrees Fahrenheit or lower. Make sure you store any meat, eggs, veggies and milk within two hours. Place raw meat on the bottom shelf, away from produce or ready-to-eat food. If any food is left out at room temperature for longer than two hours, throw it away. Place foods being thawed or marinated in the refrigerator. Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Cooking a Holiday Ham

Posted 6 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

-- If you're cooking a holiday ham, make sure it's properly prepared to prevent foodborne illness. The U.S. Department of Agriculture advises: Set the oven temperature to at least 325 degrees Fahrenheit to reheat a fully cooked, packaged ham. Cook until the internal temperature reaches 140 degrees Fahrenheit. Use a food thermometer to detect the temperature. Heat a smoked packaged ham to an internal temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit. Cook a fresh ham to an internal temperature of 140 degrees Fahrenheit. Let sit for three minutes before serving. Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Exploding Some Turkey Myths

Posted 23 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 23, 2016 – A nutrition expert is talking turkey to dispel some common myths about the focus of most Thanksgiving meals. The most-repeated myth is that eating turkey makes you sleepy. While it does contain tryptophan – an amino acid supplement that promotes sleep when taken alone on an empty stomach – turkey also contains many other amino acids that are likely to limit the effects of tryptophan, said Judith Rodriguez. She is chair of the department of nutrition and dietetics at the University of North Florida. After a large meal, your sleepiness is more likely due to blood being diverted from throughout the body, including the muscles and brain, to the stomach for digestion, Rodriguez explained in a university news release. The second-most popular myth is that turkey skin is made up of bad "saturated" fat. Turkey skin doesn't contain just bad fats, it also has some ... Read more

Related support groups: Tryptophan, Salmonella Gastroenteritis, Tryptan, Aminomine

How to Prepare That Holiday Turkey Safely

Posted 22 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 – The traditional turkey centerpiece on Thanksgiving tables may come out looking scrumptious, but cooks in the kitchen need to be concerned about preparing the bird safely to prevent the spread of foodborne illness. That's the advice from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), which offers the following safety precautions based on how your turkey will be prepared: Fresh Turkey A fresh turkey should be refrigerated until it's time to cook it. Be sure to place it in a pan that will catch any leaking juices and prevent the spread of potentially harmful bacteria, the agency advises. The USDA also recommends buying a fresh turkey no more than a day or two ahead of time. Never buy a pre-stuffed fresh turkey, the agency adds. The stuffing in these turkeys may not have been handled properly and may contain harmful germs. Frozen Turkey Turkeys can be safely ... Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Bagged Salads May Be Fertile Ground for Bacteria

Posted 18 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 18, 2016 – Prepackaged salads may promote the growth of salmonella bacteria, researchers report. They found that even slight damage to leaves in salad bags released juices that encouraged the spread of salmonella. These salad juices also boosted the bacteria's ability to form biofilms, which cling tightly to the surfaces they coat. This makes it hard to wash the bacteria off the produce, the researchers said. Most salad leaf crops are first exposed to salmonella in the field, from sources such as insects, bird droppings and manure, explained study co-author Primrose Freestone, an associate professor of clinical microbiology at the University of Leicester in England. She noted that prepackaged salads are common in grocery stores, and are also served in fast food and airline meals, but few studies had examined how salmonella behaves in these products. Her team's study was ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Separate Foods

Posted 3 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Raw meat can spread germs to other foods, so it's best to store and cook different foods separately. The foodsafety.gov website suggests: Designate separate cutting boards; one just for produce, and another for meat, poultry, seafood and eggs. Use separate plates as well, and always wash the plates after use. At the grocery, put poultry, eggs, seafood and meat in separate plastic bags away from the rest of the food. Keep poultry, meat, seafood and eggs in these separate bags inside the refrigerator or freezer. Store eggs in the carton in the main part of the refrigerator, rather than in the door. Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Make Sure Eggs Are Thoroughly Cooked

Posted 2 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Enjoying an egg for a meal or snack? Make sure it's properly cooked to avoid food-borne illness. The FoodSafety.gov website recommends: Cooking scrambled eggs until they are no longer runny and are firm to the touch. Baking, broiling, frying or poaching eggs until both the yolk and white feel firm. Baking casseroles and other egg dishes until the center reaches 160 degrees Fahrenheit, measured with a food thermometer. Replacing raw egg whites with liquid egg substitute or a cooked mixture of egg and milk. Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Learn About Salmonella

Posted 10 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Salmonella bacteria is a common source of foodborne illness, but there are things you can do to protect yourself and your loved ones. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advises: Never eat raw or undercooked eggs, which can harbor salmonella and other germs. Food is more often left unrefrigerated for long periods during summer, making food poisoning more common when the weather is warmer. Salmonella infection is downright dangerous for many people, including those with chronic diseases or weakened immune systems. Salmonella can affect many different foods, such as meat, sprouts, processed foods, eggs, fruits and vegetables. A salmonella infection can last for several days and cause diarrhea, stomach cramps and fever. Salmonella infections are relatively common, but most people don't seek a doctor's treatment, so an infection often goes unreported. Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Pet Turtles Continue to Spread Salmonella

Posted 15 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 15, 2016 – Kissing a turtle may be more than just yucky – sometimes it can literally be sickening. U.S. health officials found that illegal small turtles caused 15 outbreaks of Salmonella in the United States over the past decade. Half of the cases were in children under 10. Certain behaviors were likely to lead to infection, the new report said. Among those behaviors: "Kissing turtles, letting them roam on kitchen countertops and tabletops where food and drink is prepared or consumed, and cleaning turtle habitats in kitchen sinks," researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. Although banned since 1975, turtles less than 4 inches long remain popular as pets in the United States, according to the report. "Exposure to small pet turtles has long been recognized as a source of human salmonellosis in the United States, and the public health ... Read more

Related support groups: Salmonella Enteric Fever, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Multistate Salmonella Outbreak Linked to Garden of Life RAW Meal Products: CDC

Posted 3 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 3, 2016 – A salmonella outbreak that has sickened 11 people in nine states appears to be linked to RAW Meal Organic Shake & Meal Replacement products made by Garden of Life, federal health officials say. One person has been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Ten patients who were interviewed said they consumed RAW Meal products in the week before they became ill. Health officials in Utah and Oregon said salmonella was found in open containers of RAW Meal products collected from patients' homes. On Jan. 29, Garden of Life recalled some RAW Meal Organic Shake & Meal Replacement products in original, chocolate, vanilla and vanilla chai varieties due to possible salmonella contamination. The products were sold online and in retail stores across the United States. The products have a long shelf life ... Read more

Related support groups: Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation and Deficiency, Salmonella Enteric Fever, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

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