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Salmonella Gastroenteritis News

Health Tip: Learn About Salmonella

Posted 16 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Salmonella bacteria is a common source of foodborne illness, but there are things you can do to protect yourself and your loved ones. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advises: Never eat raw or undercooked eggs, which can harbor salmonella and other germs. Food is more often left unrefrigerated for long periods during summer, making food poisoning more common when the weather is warmer. Salmonella infection is downright dangerous for many people, including those with chronic diseases or weakened immune systems. Salmonella can affect many different foods, such as meat, sprouts, processed foods, eggs, fruits and vegetables. A salmonella infection can last for several days and cause diarrhea, stomach cramps and fever. Salmonella infections are relatively common, but most people don't seek a doctor's treatment, so an infection often goes unreported. Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Pet Turtles Continue to Spread Salmonella

Posted 15 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 15, 2016 – Kissing a turtle may be more than just yucky – sometimes it can literally be sickening. U.S. health officials found that illegal small turtles caused 15 outbreaks of Salmonella in the United States over the past decade. Half of the cases were in children under 10. Certain behaviors were likely to lead to infection, the new report said. Among those behaviors: "Kissing turtles, letting them roam on kitchen countertops and tabletops where food and drink is prepared or consumed, and cleaning turtle habitats in kitchen sinks," researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. Although banned since 1975, turtles less than 4 inches long remain popular as pets in the United States, according to the report. "Exposure to small pet turtles has long been recognized as a source of human salmonellosis in the United States, and the public health ... Read more

Related support groups: Salmonella Enteric Fever, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Multistate Salmonella Outbreak Linked to Garden of Life RAW Meal Products: CDC

Posted 3 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 3, 2016 – A salmonella outbreak that has sickened 11 people in nine states appears to be linked to RAW Meal Organic Shake & Meal Replacement products made by Garden of Life, federal health officials say. One person has been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Ten patients who were interviewed said they consumed RAW Meal products in the week before they became ill. Health officials in Utah and Oregon said salmonella was found in open containers of RAW Meal products collected from patients' homes. On Jan. 29, Garden of Life recalled some RAW Meal Organic Shake & Meal Replacement products in original, chocolate, vanilla and vanilla chai varieties due to possible salmonella contamination. The products were sold online and in retail stores across the United States. The products have a long shelf life ... Read more

Related support groups: Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation and Deficiency, Salmonella Enteric Fever, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Taking an Antidiarrheal Drug?

Posted 3 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

-- An over-the-counter antidiarrheal drug can help clear a bout of diarrhea, but it's important to take the medication properly. The Academy of Family Physicians suggests: Following the label's instructions on how often to take the medication, and how much to take. Calling your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions or are taking other medications. Taking no more than the suggested maximum. More medication does not work more effectively or quickly. Using only one antidiarrheal medication at a time, unless directed by your doctor. Read more

Related support groups: Diarrhea, Imodium, Lomotil, Diarrhea, Chronic, Loperamide, Diarrhea, Acute, Anti-Diarrheal, Lonox, Imodium A-D, Infectious Diarrhea, Atropine/Diphenoxylate, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis, Vi-Atro, Loperamide/Simethicone, Kao-Paverin, Lomanate, Logen, Diamode, Kaopectate 1-D

Preventable Ills Cause Nearly 8 Million Childhood Deaths Globally

Posted 25 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 25, 2016 – Most of the nearly 8 million deaths of children and teens around the world in 2013 were avoidable, a new report says. More than 6 million children younger than 5 lost their lives because of treatable conditions like malaria, diarrhea and respiratory tract infections, according to pediatric researchers who've analyzed results of the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013. "The vast majority of deaths in children and adolescents are preventable," said the authors from the Global Burden of Disease Pediatrics Collaboration. "Proven interventions exist to prevent diarrheal and respiratory diseases, neonatal conditions, iron deficiency anemia and road injuries, which result in some of the highest burdens of unnecessary death and disability among children and adolescents." For the study, the researchers from around the world used data from a variety of sources to target ... Read more

Related support groups: Diarrhea, Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Malaria, Diarrhea, Chronic, Malaria Prevention, Diarrhea, Acute, Malaria Prophylaxis, Salmonella Enteric Fever, Infectious Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Dietitian Experts Offer Holiday Food Safety Tips

Posted 25 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 24, 2015 – As families gather around the table to share holiday meals and treats, food poisoning is usually the last thing on anyone's mind. But food safety should always be considered, and the holidays aren't an exception, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. There are many common mistakes people can make while preparing meals, buffets or homemade holiday gifts, the academy cautioned. Nutritional experts from the academy provided 10 tips to help home cooks keep their families, loved ones and co-workers safe this holiday season: Keep hands clean. Cooks and bakers should wash their hands before, during and after preparing food. Proper hand hygiene can get rid of most germs that cause food poisoning. It's important for people working in a kitchen to wash their hands between tasks, particularly if they've been handling raw meat. Clean all tools and ... Read more

Related support groups: Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Tiny Turtles Carry Salmonella Threat

Posted 23 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 23, 2015 – Although they've been banned as pets in the United States since 1975, small turtles are still causing salmonella infections, mostly in children, researchers report. The turtles, less than 4 inches long, remain popular pets, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. In a new report released Wednesday, CDC researchers identified eight salmonella outbreaks between 2011 and 2013, causing 473 illnesses across the country. "Salmonella from small turtles is a significant public health issue," said study lead researcher Maroya Walters, an epidemiologist with the CDC. "These outbreaks were in 41 states, Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico, so this is a big, widespread issue," she said. Walters said that although the small turtles have been banned as pets, they are still available for education, display or research purposes. And they're also sold ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Salmonella Enteric Fever, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

How to Have a Healthy Holiday Season

Posted 7 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Dec. 6, 2015 – You're at increased risk for colds and the flu over the holidays, but a few simple measures will help lower your chances of getting sick, an expert says. "With all the hustle and bustle of the holidays, we come into contact with more germs, and even sugary treats, that can weaken the immune system," Stacey Gorski, an assistant professor of biology and an immunology specialist at University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, said in a university news release. Your first line of defense is a flu shot. The flu causes an average of 30,000 deaths and more than 200,000 hospitalizations every year, Gorski said. You need to keep exercising over the holidays, because physical activity helps keep your immune system primed for action, she noted. Getting enough sleep also keeps your immune system strong, she said. It may be difficult, but you should limit holiday sweets ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Influenza, Cold Symptoms, Sore Throat, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Salmonella Gastroenteritis, Enterocolitis

Celery-Onion Blend Is Cause of E.Coli Outbreak Tied to Costco Chicken Salad: CDC

Posted 29 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 27, 2015 – A celery-onion blend included in a rotisserie chicken salad from Costco stores is the probable culprit behind an ongoing E.coli outbreak and has been recalled, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday. According to a CDC news release, the Montana Public Health Laboratory tested the diced celery-onion blend and found results that "indicated the presence of E. coli O157:H7." As a result, "Taylor Farms Pacific, Inc., voluntarily recalled multiple products containing celery," the agency said. The E. coli outbreak that has so far sickened 19 people in seven states has been linked to rotisserie chicken salad made and sold at Costco stores. Most of the illnesses have occurred in the western United States. Affected states are California, Colorado, Missouri, Montana, Utah, Washington and Virginia. Five patients have been hospitalized and two have ... Read more

Related support groups: Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea Prophylaxis

E. Coli Linked to Costco Chicken Salad Sickens 19 in Seven States

Posted 25 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25, 2015 – An E. coli outbreak that has so far sickened 19 people in seven states is linked to rotisserie chicken salad made and sold at Costco stores, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday. Most of the illnesses have occurred in the western United States. Affected states are California, Colorado, Missouri, Montana, Utah, Washington and Virginia. Five patients have been hospitalized and two have developed kidney failure, the CDC said. No deaths have been reported. An investigation found that many of the patients bought or ate rotisserie chicken salad from Costco. However, the specific ingredient in the chicken salad linked to the outbreak has not been identified, the agency said. On Nov. 20, Costco said it had removed all remaining rotisserie chicken salad from its U.S. stores and stopped making the product until further notice. The product is ... Read more

Related support groups: Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Thawing Your Thanksgiving Turkey

Posted 25 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Proper thawing of your Thanksgiving turkey can help ensure a healthy meal. If thawed incorrectly, your bird can become a source of food poisoning. The U.S. Department of Agriculture advises: Never allow a frozen turkey to thaw at room temperature. Choose one of three thawing methods: the refrigerator, cold water or microwave. To use the refrigerator, allow for 24 hours of thawing time per 4-5 pounds of turkey, assuming your fridge is set at about 40 degrees Fahrenheit. Make sure the turkey is inside a leak-proof container. To thaw in cold water, allow for 30 minutes of thawing per pound of turkey. Wrap the turkey in a plastic bag that won't leak, and submerge in cold water. Change the water ever 30 minutes until the turkey is thawed completely, then cook immediately. To defrost in a microwave, follow the package instructions. Make sure you cook the turkey immediately after thawing. Read more

Related support groups: Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

FDA Finalizes New Food Safety Rules

Posted 13 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 13, 2015 – In the wake of wide-ranging outbreaks of foodborne illness, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday finalized new rules to help keep contaminated food out of American kitchens. These food safety regulations for fruit and vegetable farms and food importers were developed as a result of the Food Safety Modernization Act of 2011. "These rules, for the first time, establish enforceable safety standards of production and harvesting of produce, and make importers accountable for the safety of the food they bring into the United States," Michael Taylor, FDA deputy commissioner for foods and veterinary medicine, said during a Friday morning news conference. This is the first time that produce farmers and food importers have fallen directly under FDA regulations, he said. Taylor said that outbreaks caused by leafy greens, cantaloupes, cilantro and other produce ... Read more

Related support groups: Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Kitchen Utensils Can Spread Bacteria, Study Finds

Posted 13 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 12, 2015 – Kitchen utensils such as knives and graters can spread bacteria between different types of produce, a new study finds. University of Georgia researchers contaminated different types of fruits and vegetables with bacteria such as salmonella and E. coli. They cut the produce with a knife or shredded it with a grater, then used the unwashed utensils on other produce. Both utensils spread the bacteria to other types of produce, the study found. The researchers also found that certain types of produce contaminated knives to different degrees. "For items like tomatoes, we tended to have a higher contamination of the knives than when we cut strawberries," said lead author Marilyn Erickson, an associate professor in the department of food science and technology. "We don't have a specific answer as to why there are differences between the different produce groups. But ... Read more

Related support groups: Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: When a Stomach Bug Hits

Posted 5 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

-- When you or your child is taken down by a stomach bug, waiting for symptoms to subside can be miserable. The Cleveland Clinic suggests these tips for easing discomfort: Drink clear liquids. Cold is better to ease nausea. Gradually increase amounts, and drink slowly. Once vomiting subsides, nibble on foods that are light and bland, such as dry toast or plain crackers. Don't eat anything greasy, fried or sweet. Eat very small meals more frequently, and eat slowly. Don't combine hot and cold foods. After you eat, don't brush your teeth immediately. Move as little as possible. Read more

Related support groups: Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Multistate Foodborne Illness Outbreaks the Most Deadly: CDC

Posted 3 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 3, 2015 – Multistate outbreaks caused by contaminated food account for more than half of all foodborne illness deaths in the United States, even though they only represent 3 percent of all reported outbreaks, a new government report shows. The findings prompted U.S. health officials to urge the food industry to play a larger role in preventing multistate outbreaks, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. "Americans shouldn't have to worry about getting sick from the food they eat," CDC director Dr. Tom Frieden said during a news conference Tuesday. But each year one in six Americans is sickened by contaminated food, he said, adding that, "food industries play a critical role in improving our food safety." The food industry can help stop outbreaks by keeping better records to allow officials to trace contaminated food faster and by alerting consumers to ... Read more

Related support groups: Poisoning, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Traveler's Diarrhea, Salmonella Enteric Fever, Salmonella Gastroenteritis, Meningitis - Listeriosis, Traveler's Diarrhea Prophylaxis, Enterocolitis, Salmonella Extraintestinal Infection

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