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Health Tip: Cook Your Turkey Safely

Posted 10 days ago by Drugs.com

-- No one wants the Thanksgiving holiday ruined by a nasty case of food poisoning that stems from the guest of honor – the turkey. FoodSafety.gov offers these turkey safe-preparation suggestions: If you'll serve a fresh turkey, buy it no more than two days before Thanksgiving. On the other hand. frozen turkey needs time to thaw properly in the refrigerator. Rely on a refrigerator thermometer to make sure the turkey is stored at 40 degrees F. Use a food thermometer to check that the cooking temperature reaches 165 degrees F. Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Enteric Fever, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Handle Chicken With Care

Posted 2 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Chicken is a mainstay in many American households, but it may lead to food poisoning if not cooked properly and handled with care. Foodsafety.gov suggests how to help keep your family safe: Wash handswith warm soapy water for 20 seconds before and after handling chicken. Do not wash raw chicken.Its juices can contaminate other foods, utensils and countertops during washing. Use a separate cutting board for raw chicken. Wash cutting board, utensils, dishes, and countertops with hot soapy water after preparing chicken. Never place other foods on dirty plates, cutting boards, or other surfaces that held raw chicken. Use a food thermometerand cook chicken to the safe internal temperature of 165 degrees F. If you are served chicken that appears undercooked, send it back for more cooking. Refrigerate or freeze leftover chicken within 2 hours (or within 1 hour if the temperature is higher ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Salmonella Enteric Fever, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

What's Your Real Salmonella Risk?

Posted 24 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 24, 2017 – Every year, roughly 1 in 6 Americans gets sick from contaminated food. That includes more than 1.2 million illnesses due to the bacteria salmonella. This nasty germ can cause a lot of unpleasant symptoms, including diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal cramps and fever, typically lasting for 4 to 7 days. And while foodborne illnesses in general have gone down in recent years, salmonella infections have increased, according to federal statistics. Many cases are contracted from food eaten in restaurants, but salmonella can also be transmitted through common foods bought at stores and cooked at home. Infection is also more of a risk during warm weather when unrefrigerated foods at picnics and barbecues provide the ideal conditions for it. Foods causing the most illnesses include eggs, sprouts and vine-stalk vegetables like tomatoes, according to the U.S. Centers for ... Read more

Related support groups: Salmonella Enteric Fever, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Camping and Cooking Outdoors

Posted 23 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Anyone preparing for a camping trip that involves outdoor cooking should include a meat thermometer with their camping gear, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services says on its foodsafety.gov website. Outdoor cooking is a prime breeding environment for harmful bacteria such as salmonella and E. coli. But cooking food to the right internal temperature can help thwart these dangerous germs. The agency suggests: Cook all raw beef, pork, lamb and veal steaks, chops and roasts to 160 degrees Fahrenheit. Cook all poultry, hot dogs and any leftover food to 165 degrees Fahrenheit. Allow meat to sit for three minutes before carving or eating. Be sure to clean the meat thermometer between uses. Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Enteric Fever, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Get the Facts About Salmonella

Posted 28 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Salmonella is a bacterium that's a frequent culprit in foodborne illness. While it often affects eggs and poultry, its reach can spread much wider. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers these facts about the germ: Beef, eggs (especially raw), chicken, pork, vegetables, sprouts, fruits and frozen foods are common sources of Salmonella. But you can't smell or taste the germ. Illness from Salmonella occurs more frequently during summer, when food may be left in the heat. Some people are at a greater risk of serious complications from Salmonella. These include young children, seniors and anyone with a compromised immune system. Salmonella is responsible for many more illnesses than are actually reported. Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Enteric Fever, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Cooking Out? Don't Forget Your Food Thermometer

Posted 18 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, June 17, 2017 – Keep food safety at the top of your mind when you cook out this summer. A key is using a food thermometer when you prepare meat or poultry, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS). "The best and only way to make sure bacteria have been killed and food is safe to eat is by cooking it to the correct internal temperature as measured by a food thermometer," FSIS Administrator Al Almanza said in an agency news release. "It is a simple step that can stop your family and guests from getting foodborne illness," he added. Every year, about 48 million people in the United States get food-borne illnesses, resulting in 128,000 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But many folks fail to take precautions. For example, only 34 percent of Americans use a food ... Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Enteric Fever, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis

Warmer Waters May Mean More Toxic Shellfish

Posted 9 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 9, 2017 – Unusually warm ocean temperatures near the U.S. Pacific Northwest have been linked to dangerous levels of a natural toxin in shellfish. But, researchers report they have developed new ways to predict these toxic outbreaks. The toxin, domoic acid, is produced by marine algae, or plant life. It builds up in seafood, posing a potential threat. Consuming the toxin can be harmful to humans, the researchers said. The project was funded by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). "We describe a completely new method to understanding and predicting toxic outbreaks on a large scale, linking domoic acid concentrations in shellfish to ocean conditions caused by warm water phases of natural climate event cycles," said study author Morgaine McKibben of Oregon State University. Those "climate event cycles" include El Nino and a similar but long-term ... Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Poisoning, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Salmonella Enteric Fever, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

How to Ship Food Gifts Without Risk

Posted 22 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 21, 2016 – Homemade food gifts can make loved ones afar feel closer, but it's important to take extra safety precautions to prevent food poisoning, according to the American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AAND). Bacteria that cause food-borne illnesses grow quickly at temperatures between 40 degrees and 140 degrees Fahrenheit, potentially doubling every 20 minutes, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. When shipping perishable items, make sure they are kept below 40 degrees, AAND advises. Let the recipient know a perishable package is on the way and be sure someone will be home to receive it. Even foods that are smoked, cured or fully cooked should be kept cold. This can be done using dry ice and foam or heavy corrugated cardboard packaging, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service recommends. Whenever ... Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Enteric Fever, Traveler's Diarrhea, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Pet Turtles Continue to Spread Salmonella

Posted 15 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 15, 2016 – Kissing a turtle may be more than just yucky – sometimes it can literally be sickening. U.S. health officials found that illegal small turtles caused 15 outbreaks of Salmonella in the United States over the past decade. Half of the cases were in children under 10. Certain behaviors were likely to lead to infection, the new report said. Among those behaviors: "Kissing turtles, letting them roam on kitchen countertops and tabletops where food and drink is prepared or consumed, and cleaning turtle habitats in kitchen sinks," researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. Although banned since 1975, turtles less than 4 inches long remain popular as pets in the United States, according to the report. "Exposure to small pet turtles has long been recognized as a source of human salmonellosis in the United States, and the public health ... Read more

Related support groups: Salmonella Enteric Fever, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Multistate Salmonella Outbreak Linked to Garden of Life RAW Meal Products: CDC

Posted 3 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 3, 2016 – A salmonella outbreak that has sickened 11 people in nine states appears to be linked to RAW Meal Organic Shake & Meal Replacement products made by Garden of Life, federal health officials say. One person has been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Ten patients who were interviewed said they consumed RAW Meal products in the week before they became ill. Health officials in Utah and Oregon said salmonella was found in open containers of RAW Meal products collected from patients' homes. On Jan. 29, Garden of Life recalled some RAW Meal Organic Shake & Meal Replacement products in original, chocolate, vanilla and vanilla chai varieties due to possible salmonella contamination. The products were sold online and in retail stores across the United States. The products have a long shelf life ... Read more

Related support groups: Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation and Deficiency, Salmonella Enteric Fever, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Preventable Ills Cause Nearly 8 Million Childhood Deaths Globally

Posted 25 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 25, 2016 – Most of the nearly 8 million deaths of children and teens around the world in 2013 were avoidable, a new report says. More than 6 million children younger than 5 lost their lives because of treatable conditions like malaria, diarrhea and respiratory tract infections, according to pediatric researchers who've analyzed results of the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013. "The vast majority of deaths in children and adolescents are preventable," said the authors from the Global Burden of Disease Pediatrics Collaboration. "Proven interventions exist to prevent diarrheal and respiratory diseases, neonatal conditions, iron deficiency anemia and road injuries, which result in some of the highest burdens of unnecessary death and disability among children and adolescents." For the study, the researchers from around the world used data from a variety of sources to target ... Read more

Related support groups: Diarrhea, Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Malaria, Diarrhea, Chronic, Malaria Prevention, Diarrhea, Acute, Malaria Prophylaxis, Salmonella Enteric Fever, Infectious Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Tiny Turtles Carry Salmonella Threat

Posted 23 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 23, 2015 – Although they've been banned as pets in the United States since 1975, small turtles are still causing salmonella infections, mostly in children, researchers report. The turtles, less than 4 inches long, remain popular pets, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. In a new report released Wednesday, CDC researchers identified eight salmonella outbreaks between 2011 and 2013, causing 473 illnesses across the country. "Salmonella from small turtles is a significant public health issue," said study lead researcher Maroya Walters, an epidemiologist with the CDC. "These outbreaks were in 41 states, Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico, so this is a big, widespread issue," she said. Walters said that although the small turtles have been banned as pets, they are still available for education, display or research purposes. And they're also sold ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Salmonella Enteric Fever, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Multistate Foodborne Illness Outbreaks the Most Deadly: CDC

Posted 3 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 3, 2015 – Multistate outbreaks caused by contaminated food account for more than half of all foodborne illness deaths in the United States, even though they only represent 3 percent of all reported outbreaks, a new government report shows. The findings prompted U.S. health officials to urge the food industry to play a larger role in preventing multistate outbreaks, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. "Americans shouldn't have to worry about getting sick from the food they eat," CDC director Dr. Tom Frieden said during a news conference Tuesday. But each year one in six Americans is sickened by contaminated food, he said, adding that, "food industries play a critical role in improving our food safety." The food industry can help stop outbreaks by keeping better records to allow officials to trace contaminated food faster and by alerting consumers to ... Read more

Related support groups: Poisoning, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Salmonella Enteric Fever, Traveler's Diarrhea, Salmonella Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea Prophylaxis, Enterocolitis, Salmonella Extraintestinal Infection, Meningitis - Listeriosis

More Than 730 Illnesses Reported in Latest Salmonella Outbreak

Posted 6 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 – A salmonella outbreak that has been linked to contaminated cucumbers imported from Mexico has now caused 732 illnesses in 35 states, U.S. health officials said Tuesday. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the cucumbers were distributed in Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Florida, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Minnesota, Mississippi, Montana, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, Texas and Utah. Distribution to other states may also have occurred, the agency added. Four deaths have been reported in the outbreak: one in Arizona, one in California, one in Oklahoma, and one in Texas. So far, 150 people have been hospitalized, CDC officials said Tuesday. Fifty percent of the illnesses reported have been in children under the age of 18, agency officials added. ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Salmonella Enteric Fever, Infectious Diarrhea, Salmonella Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Extraintestinal Infection

More Than 670 Illnesses Reported in Latest Salmonella Outbreak

Posted 29 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 29, 2015 – A salmonella outbreak that has been linked to contaminated cucumbers imported from Mexico has now caused 671 illnesses in 34 states, U.S. health officials said Tuesday. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the cucumbers were distributed in Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Florida, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Minnesota, Mississippi, Montana, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, Texas and Utah. Distribution to other states may also have occurred, the agency added. Three deaths have been reported in the outbreak: one in Arizona, one in California and one in Texas. So far, 131 people have been hospitalized, CDC officials said Tuesday. Fifty-one percent of the illnesses reported have been in children under the age of 18, agency officials added. On Sept. ... Read more

Related support groups: Salmonella Enteric Fever, Salmonella Extraintestinal Infection, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

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